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Old 08-21-2009, 01:27 AM   #1
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Would some one help me out please?

OK here's the deal?

I want to go in the career field where I can walk into a meeting and with my 3d graphics skills and throw in some idea's on a story, for a movie, game, commercial, animation short some times when you find them in pixar movies? Stay about 1-3 hours get paid leave, then do it again later?


What job is that, and what career path is that?

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Old 08-21-2009, 09:00 AM   #2
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So, at this college you attend, do they have a career center? Have you spoken with a guidance counselor of any kind?
Do you want to just "throw in some idea's" and leave? Or do you also want to stick around and do the work? Sounds like you'd want to free-lance. It does include creating a body of work for a portfolio, not just participating in brain-storming sessions.
Go to your college's career center. They all have them.
(ideas- plural, idea's- possessive)
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Old 08-21-2009, 01:38 PM   #3
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have you spoken to a local tech school?
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Old 08-21-2009, 04:25 PM   #4
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Sounds like a are-lance graphic designer to me. Check these sites:

Graphic Designer Career Information. Graphic Design Schools, Jobs

http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos090.htm
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Old 08-21-2009, 04:55 PM   #5
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For starters, you can move out here to L.A., walk into Dreamworks and present them with your ideas, but in the meantime you'll be waiting tables to support yourself. Freelancing is tough work.
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Old 08-21-2009, 08:16 PM   #6
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Thank you very much everyone.

I'mgoing to talk to my counselor on Tuesday or Wednesday!
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Old 08-23-2009, 10:44 AM   #7
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What you're describing isn't graphic design, exactly. A job where you throw out ideas and then leave, and are done with the project, would be consulting or creative directing. The thing is, the people who do those jobs have spent years working through the ranks, putting in their time, doing the actual work that would bring those ideas to fruition. And/or, they're brilliant and highly educated (think masters degree.) In short, it's not an entry-level position. It comes after lots of hard work, lots of years on the job, and as a result of a cumulative portfolio and reputation.
If you were to pursue a degree in graphic design, your classes would cover the elements and principles of design, color theory, typography, and advanced industry-standard software programs, for starters. In most schools you'll also take (and be required to pass) foundational art classes and art history classes. Often graphic designers are also proficient illustrators, computer programmers, or web developers; skills which make them more versatile to potential employers.
The field of graphic design is highly competitive. There's a lot of designers out there, and many of them have insanely expensive degrees from art schools. And, since it's a job that can be done remotely, freelancers in North America and Europe are competing with people in emerging markets like India and China, where designers are able to charge much less for their work due to differences in the cost of living.
I don't mean to totally rain on your parade, but I'd rather your decision on what to study be as informed as possible. School is expensive, and you don't want to find out part-way in that you don't actually want to do for a living what you're studying.
That said, there are definitely careers in 3D animation. Depending on the school, it may be its own program, or it may be part of an illustration program, or something else. A career counsellors will be able to guide you in that regard. If that's what you love doing, then definitely go for it! But be prepared for the reality that you're most likely going to have to do the grunt-work for a while before you advance to directing or consulting.
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Old 08-23-2009, 11:07 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by apple*tart View Post
What you're describing isn't graphic design, exactly. A job where you throw out ideas and then leave, and are done with the project, would be consulting or creative directing. The thing is, the people who do those jobs have spent years working through the ranks, putting in their time, doing the actual work that would bring those ideas to fruition. And/or, they're brilliant and highly educated (think masters degree.) In short, it's not an entry-level position. It comes after lots of hard work, lots of years on the job, and as a result of a cumulative portfolio and reputation.
If you were to pursue a degree in graphic design, your classes would cover the elements and principles of design, color theory, typography, and advanced industry-standard software programs, for starters. In most schools you'll also take (and be required to pass) foundational art classes and art history classes. Often graphic designers are also proficient illustrators, computer programmers, or web developers; skills which make them more versatile to potential employers.
The field of graphic design is highly competitive. There's a lot of designers out there, and many of them have insanely expensive degrees from art schools. And, since it's a job that can be done remotely, freelancers in North America and Europe are competing with people in emerging markets like India and China, where designers are able to charge much less for their work due to differences in the cost of living.
I don't mean to totally rain on your parade, but I'd rather your decision on what to study be as informed as possible. School is expensive, and you don't want to find out part-way in that you don't actually want to do for a living what you're studying.
That said, there are definitely careers in 3D animation. Depending on the school, it may be its own program, or it may be part of an illustration program, or something else. A career counsellors will be able to guide you in that regard. If that's what you love doing, then definitely go for it! But be prepared for the reality that you're most likely going to have to do the grunt-work for a while before you advance to directing or consulting.
Hi AT,


You know I am pursuing a career in the art of 3d graphics, textures, and so on. Yeah I know it's a young mans game but this old dog has a few tricks up his sleeve, and a good work ethic, too boot!
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Old 08-23-2009, 12:14 PM   #9
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Derek, you simply can't count on getting your dream job any more than an acting student can count on winning an Oscar, a law student can count on being appointed to the Supreme Court, an English major can count on writing a best seller, or a college athlete can count on winning the Heisman Trophy.

Pick a field you ENJOY, one in which you have some talent. Then if you don't happen to land your dream job, you'll still be happy working in the field.

Remember, in highly competitive fields making it big is as much about timing, luck, and who you know as it is about talent and hard work. That's just the way the world works.
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Old 08-23-2009, 11:40 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Scotch View Post
Derek, you simply can't count on getting your dream job any more than an acting student can count on winning an Oscar, a law student can count on being appointed to the Supreme Court, an English major can count on writing a best seller, or a college athlete can count on winning the Heisman Trophy.

Pick a field you ENJOY, one in which you have some talent. Then if you don't happen to land your dream job, you'll still be happy working in the field.

Remember, in highly competitive fields making it big is as much about timing, luck, and who you know as it is about talent and hard work. That's just the way the world works.
Well mate, Your wrong I'm a go getter and if I can get any kind of graphics job by working my arse off I will, Just watch and see, bro! Plus I love it when people say I can't do stuff and prove them wrong, I' am not trying to be mean or anything, I'm just stating a fact, Heck if I can get a job in the graphics world even sitting at a desk 12 hours a day putting something simple graphics together and printing them out, I'd be happy, And therefor it would be my dream job where I can better my self.
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