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Old 06-14-2014, 08:19 AM   #21
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I have seen that adding a little water to your beaten eggs will help make the the omelette fluffy, due to the water and steam it makes.
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Old 06-14-2014, 08:58 AM   #22
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Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhizara View Post
Try toasting a slice of bread in your pan and flipping it. it's an easy way to learn the basic feel.
Thanks! - That idea worked well for me.

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Old 06-14-2014, 11:15 AM   #23
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Waffle house blends the eggs and milk in a milkshake type blender. Its attached right there next to the open flame for the omelet pans.
I have watched them make them.

Flipping things in a pan takes the right kind of pan and experience.
Omelets do not need to be flipped and are allowed to slide almost out of the pan and the fold is made with the edge of the pan. Its very simple and I even taught my wife how to do it.

Waffle house omelets are different as nothing is enclosed in the omelet. Everything used is incorporated into the egg mixture except the cheese, then poured into the pan. Similar to a fritada. Except they are much more fluffy.
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Old 06-15-2014, 08:56 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmaker60 View Post
I have seen that adding a little water to your beaten eggs will help make the the omelette fluffy, due to the water and steam it makes.
I always add a little water because I was told to. Never knew why though. Thankds
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Old 06-15-2014, 08:59 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Waffle house blends the eggs and milk in a milkshake type blender. Its attached right there next to the open flame for the omelet pans.
I have watched them make them.

Flipping things in a pan takes the right kind of pan and experience.
Omelets do not need to be flipped and are allowed to slide almost out of the pan and the fold is made with the edge of the pan. Its very simple and I even taught my wife how to do it.

Waffle house omelets are different as nothing is enclosed in the omelet. Everything used is incorporated into the egg mixture except the cheese, then poured into the pan. Similar to a fritada. Except they are much more fluffy.
Thank you, Bones. That was what I was trying, very ineptly, to say earlier! You explained it much more succinctly
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Old 06-15-2014, 11:42 AM   #26
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Thank you, Bones. That was what I was trying, very ineptly, to say earlier! You explained it much more succinctly
And here I thought it was ambiguous at best........lol
Thanks for the kind words.
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Old 06-21-2014, 10:14 PM   #27
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One time when I tried to flip an omelette, the dog was very happy. I'm a little more careful now.
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Old 06-22-2014, 01:48 AM   #28
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I finish my omelette under the broiler. It gets nice and fluffy that way. At about the same point you'd want to flip the omelette is when you put in any filling ingredients and throw it under the broiler. Haven't had a fluffier omelette.
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Old 06-22-2014, 10:48 AM   #29
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I too have had difficulties flipping fried eggs, omelettes, and even pancakes. When my type "A" personality gets totally frustrated I employ my own flipping method:

I point directly at the offending pan, pronate my hand, ball up my fist, extend my middle finger to its full length, and utter unmentionable oaths with a grimace.

(doesn't correct the original problem but makes me feel a little better) {:-D]
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Old 06-22-2014, 11:13 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhizara View Post
Try toasting a slice of bread in your pan and flipping it. it's an easy way to learn the basic feel.
Great suggestion! Before you flip the toasted bread, place dried peas into your pan and practice flipping them. Do it on your counter, so that if you spill any, clean up is easy. You will get the hang of it in no time. Then, go ahead and cook up that toast.

Good foods to cook and flip for beginners are stir fries, with chunks of meat and veggies, with butter or oil to keep the food from sticking. And just so's ya knows, flipping an egg takes more energy as the egg is heaver, and one cohesive chunk of food, like that piece of toast. But if you use the same amount of energy to flip the egg as you did the toast, you will probably flip it too high, and break the yolk. But if you use the slight motion that you use for flipping the stir fry, you will most likely flip it only part way, again breaking the yolk.

When flipping food, make sure that you where an apron, and not have too much fat in the pan, to avoid splashing hot oil onto yourself, or the stove.

For practice in flipping eggs, beat them up with a little salt, basil, and milk. Pour into your hot, buttered pan, and let cook until just starting to set. Slide the pan forward and back to loosen the egg. Try to flip it. Let it cook a little more, then flip again. You are making scrambled eggs and so it doesn't matter if the egg breaks up. But try not to break the egg. This will teach you finesse.

I see no need to flip eggs without using a spatula. I'm in my home. I don't need the speed required by professional chef's and cooks. Using a spatula, turner works very well. Even using tools though, you need to practice. I have a square, non-stick griddle that I cook four pancakes on at a time. I have to precisely flip the pancakes in place, to keep then from missing the edge of the pan, or landing on top of each other. Again, it's all in the wrist, and is learned by practice.

Notice the shape of the pan in that video. It is ideal for flipping food. Your pans look like they should work well. Also, non-stick need a little fat to really be non-stick.

Lastly, I add milk to my eggs rather than water. I feel like I get a better omelet.

Hope this helps.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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