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Old 01-08-2008, 12:40 PM   #1
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Question on braising

Hi All,

I recieved a new 5qt Dutch oven for Christmas and have a question about braising. So far I have made two different recipes in the Dutch oven, and the meat has been a bit tougher then I expected in both cases.

When braising meat, would cooking the meat longer make it more tender? I have been keeping it on a very low simmer, and am thinking that perhaps the low temperature is throwing off my timing.

Thanks

(Have made a pork shoulder roast and boneless short rib recipes so far).

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Old 01-08-2008, 12:48 PM   #2
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I would think cooking time is the culprit...not the low temperature. Try cooking longer and your meat/roast/etc. will be tender

Enjoy!
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Old 01-08-2008, 01:11 PM   #3
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Braising is cooking low and slow in liquid. It's a great technique for tough cuts of meat and meat with a lot of connective tissue. It's not a great method for lean meats.

If your meat is not tender, you didn't cook it long enough or your meat was too lean. If it's dry you cooked it for too long, or again it was too lean to begin with.
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Old 01-08-2008, 01:20 PM   #4
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To take some of the guess work out of the formular...use a thermometer to cook to a specific temperature which will depend on the type of meat you are cooking as well as your personal preference for degree of doneness. Rare, medium rare, medium etc.

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Old 01-08-2008, 01:54 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
To take some of the guess work out of the formular...use a thermometer to cook to a specific temperature which will depend on the type of meat you are cooking as well as your personal preference for degree of doneness. Rare, medium rare, medium etc.

Have Fun!

In general I agree (as I always do with my Uncle) but, IMO, you don't want to braise meat to anything but well done.

If you want meat cooked to rare, med-rare, etc, brasing is not the technique to use. Better to cook it more quickly at higher and probably dry heat.
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Old 01-08-2008, 02:31 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
In general I agree (as I always do with my Uncle) but, IMO, you don't want to braise meat to anything but well done.

If you want meat cooked to rare, med-rare, etc, brasing is not the technique to use. Better to cook it more quickly at higher and probably dry heat.
Yes. That's what I meant to say Miss Jenny!!






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Old 01-08-2008, 02:34 PM   #7
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Quote:
(Have made a pork shoulder roast and boneless short rib recipes so far).
with that knowledge in hand, you aren't cooking them long enough. altho next time, short ribs ON the bone have googobs more flavor than boneless.
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Old 01-08-2008, 04:18 PM   #8
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Thanks for the info.

I am guessing I just didn't cook for long enough then. For braising, is it even possible to cook the meat too long? I am thinking that perhaps it would be better to error on the side of leaving the meat simmer longer then the recipe says(as long as there is still plenty of liquid). Thoughts?
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Old 01-08-2008, 04:33 PM   #9
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Thanks for the info.

I am guessing I just didn't cook for long enough then. For braising, is it even possible to cook the meat too long? I am thinking that perhaps it would be better to error on the side of leaving the meat simmer longer then the recipe says(as long as there is still plenty of liquid). Thoughts?
Yes. If you cook it too long the meat will dry out. It may be "falling apart" but the moisture will have been expelled out of it. Even if you cook it in liquid. That's how the liquid picks up it's flavor.

It's usually best to follow the recipe, as long as it's a good one, rather than cook it longer by default.

How did your recipe say to cook the pork?
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Old 01-08-2008, 04:38 PM   #10
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How about you tell us how long you cooked the meats. Short ribs, were they beef?
How much liquid did you have?
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