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Old 11-08-2012, 04:19 PM   #71
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what is it then when u see vapor or water if not steaming? (covered)
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Old 11-08-2012, 04:49 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mumu View Post
what is it then when u see vapor or water if not steaming? (covered)
Water vapor can be produced by many different cooking techniques.

This website has good descriptions of lots of cooking techniques, along with links to recipes: Culinary Arts Basics: The Fundamentals of Cooking. I think it's pretty reliable.
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Old 11-08-2012, 05:08 PM   #73
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Steam is generated by the other cooking methods as well. What's key is that it's not the primary method.
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Old 11-08-2012, 05:10 PM   #74
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i thought it was steaming bec. with a lid on pot u are holding in the heat and steam that would eventually escape. And Andy said if cover lasg. the liquid in it bec. its covered is steaming the noodles
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Old 11-08-2012, 05:21 PM   #75
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Water vapor and minute water droplets seen in the air are two different things. The high-pressure steam that drives the catapults on an aircraft carrier is invisible, and under enough pressure, that blown through a pin-hole in a high pressure pipe, will cut metal. The hot droplets from a tea kettle, or boiling pot of water is also steam. Steam is also produced when frying, as the water that leaves the food is heated by the hot oil. Those bubbles you see when food is frying is superheated steam, or vapor. The bubbles release it into the air when they pop on the oil surface. It is often invisible to the eye.

The right conditions will cause visible water droplets in the air, even at very cold temperatures. We see it as clouds, or fog. It's still water, suspended in the air, and caused by external conditions on the normally invisible water vapor that's in the air.

Cullinarily, steaming food is the act of transfering heat into the food by bringing that food into contact with hot steam. There are different ways to achieve this. Most commonly, it's done by placing food into a container with myriad holes that allow steam to pass through to the food. The container with holes (steamer) is placed into a tight-fitting pan that contains boiling water. A cover is fitted to the steamer insert, trapping the hot steam. The steam transfers heat into the food, but leaves more nutrients, and color pigments in the food than does simmering, or boiling water.

Another method of steaming is achieved when food is placed on a shelf, or suspended grate in a pressure cooker. The pressure cooker uses hotter steam, as the internal pressure of the vessel allows the water to boil at a higher temperature than at normal pressure. Also, the pressure helps to further stress the food, breaking it down more quickly than is achieved in a non-pressure cooking method.

If food is placed in foil, with no added liquid, such as in a foil pouch, or en-pappiote, or even in a foil-wrapped potato, as the food heats, the water vapor that normally escapes into the air is trapped by the foil, and steams the food.

The reason that lasagna is considered a baked dish is that the liquid for the sauce, meat, and cheese simmers and cooks the noodles. Yes, steam is produced, but isn't the primary mechanism that transfers heat into the food, or hydrates the noodles.

The same is true of casseroles, pot roasts, foods made in a slow cooker, etc.

Steaming is a great way to cook many vegetables, some breads, and even a pudding. Meats are usually better when cooked by another method, at least, that's MHO.

I welcome all comments, valid corrections, and discussion. 'f I've stated something incorrectly, let me know, but have documentation to back you up.

In any case, I hope this post helps clear things up a little about what steaming is, and isn't.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 11-09-2012, 10:06 AM   #76
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ok..... what would soup or spag. sauce on the stove be, primary method ? simmering
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Old 11-09-2012, 11:23 AM   #77
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Pop quiz! You tell me :

(a) Boil: A cooking method in which items are immersed in liquid at or above the boiling point of water (212F/100C).
(b) Poach: A cooking method in which items are cooked gently in liquid at 160 to 180F.
(c) Simmer: To maintain the temperature of a liquid just below boiling. Also, a cooking method in which items are cooked in simmering liquid.
(d) Steam: A cooking method that employs hot steam to conduct the heat to the food item.
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Old 11-09-2012, 11:39 AM   #78
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i say c. i still am thinking if do lasg. say i know its baked but being covered the noodles are being steamed,so how do u tell some one or say.just baked lasg .how do u inform them it was steamed the noodles? covered baked lasg? I hope i said this right i have a hard time explain what i want to ask. thanks
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Old 11-09-2012, 11:59 AM   #79
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It's baked lasagna. Period.

As I said in my earlier post, steam is often present with other cooking methods where it is not the primary cooking method.

If you bake lasagna, the temperature goes over 212F so water boils and some steam is generated. You are neither boiling nor steaming the lasagna. If you pan sear a steak, the temperature is way over 212F so any moisture in the steak is vaporized into steam. You're not steaming the steak, you are pan searing it.

Only look at the main method.
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Old 11-09-2012, 01:49 PM   #80
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just checking if do lasg. in crock pot this would be baked to right ? not steamed even though has lid on. sorry to keep this going just trying to understand. if did cake in the crock pot its steam cake someone said here on the site.
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