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Old 12-05-2007, 10:59 AM   #1
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What is confit?

At a local restaurant there is a dish with this description:
Quote:
Confit Salmon, slow cooked & served with vanilla roasted root vegetables, braised black beans & finished with a Maltese sauce
I love salmon and root vegetables which is why I was drawn to this. But I have no idea what confit salmon is or what it would be like. Slow-cooked salmon just does not sound right. Can someone describe what this dish would be like?

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Old 12-05-2007, 11:02 AM   #2
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That would be cooked at a low temperature submerged in fat. The fat is usually flavored with herbs.

The most common is duck confit, which is duck leg quarters cooked in duck fat.
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Old 12-05-2007, 11:59 AM   #3
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Andy is right, traditionally. But I have seen so many things called a confit these days that do not even come close to that definition that I no longer have any idea what the term means.
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Old 12-05-2007, 04:36 PM   #4
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This sounds like it might be a sous vide, say perhaps salmon with dill in a butter sauce. Vacuum packed in a bag for reheating in a hot water bath.

My 17 yo grandson worked for a while as a short order cook at a chain restaurant. He tried to convince me that he could cook, but beyond pancakes and eggs, everything was basically boil in bag
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Old 12-05-2007, 04:41 PM   #5
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Oops, forgot to attach the attachment for those who haven't heard of sous-vide:
Sous-vide - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 12-05-2007, 04:52 PM   #6
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Walt, confit is different from sous-vide. For confit, were talking about 300F for 2-3 hours.

Not as low and slow as sous-vide and no vacuum involved.
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Old 12-05-2007, 05:15 PM   #7
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Andy,

Yes, but this is salmon.

I have baked a whole salmon fillet several times at 200f for anywhere from 45 min. to an hour. Works great for entertaining, because the timing is less critical, and it does'nt get overcooked. I'll bet the restaurant entry was cooked in volume several hours/days before, sealed up, and frozen.

I'm speculating that "confit" on the restaurant menu just sounds better than "Reheated in a boiling bag Salmon"
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Old 12-05-2007, 05:19 PM   #8
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Can you also explain how it's different than a tartar?
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Old 12-05-2007, 05:21 PM   #9
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I've just googled confit of salmon and got a number of recipes involving poaching salmon in oil - thr traditional confit method. Not as long as for duck. My search results:

confit of salmon - Google Search=
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:10 PM   #10
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Salmon tatare would be made using uncooked salmon (or perhaps smoked)
I have had salmon sushi and wondered how safe it was. Hopefully they freeze the salmon for some time before thawing to kill parasites.

This will scare you:
Beyond Salmon: Parasites in Fish, Part 2 -- Anisakis and Tapeworm
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