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Old 08-26-2006, 01:19 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mylegsbig
i want to do it low and slow.
I would do it on the grill, like a thick steak, or at high heat in the oven.

However, in his 1977 treatise, Theory and Practice of Good Cooking, James Beard does suggest one method for low-temperature roasting of a rib roast, which might work with a smaller tri-tip. His method can be summarized as follows:
Leave the meat at room temperature for several hours (I'm not too keen on that). Season it with pepper and rosemary and put it on a rack in a shallow roasting pan (which allows the heat to circulate). Take the roast's internal temperature at the center of the thickest portion.

Heat the oven to 250 degrees Fahrenheit. Roast the meat about 20 minutes per pound without basting. After two hours (that would make this a 6-pound roast), take the temperature again, salt the roast and add a little more pepper.

Continue roasting for another hour. Take the temperature again and calculate the time it will take to reach 120 to 125 degrees Fahrenheit (e.g., if it's going up 10 degrees an hour and is at 110, it will take roughly one more hour). When it gets to 120 to 125, which is medium rare, remove the roast and let it rest for 15 to 20 minutes before carving.

Again, this method is for a much larger piece of meat than what you have. Whether it will work well with a smaller roast is something you'll have to find out. One problem that I anticipate is that because the cooking time will be much shorter for a small roast, the outside of the roast won't be as well-browned as most people would prefer. That contrast between the well-done, deeply browned exterior and the juicy red interior of the roast adds to the overall enjoyment of the meal.
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Old 08-26-2006, 01:21 PM   #22
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[quote=jkath]Mish, I think you read about the Santa Maria tri tip from me a couple of years ago. It's awesome! /quote]

No, jkath. I read an article about Santa Maria and tri-tip from another source. That is why I post links to the source.
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Old 08-26-2006, 03:21 PM   #23
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Okay guys screw it, im gonna do it your way

help me out here as im on a limited time frame

im going to sear this piece of meat on on all sides, then set it aside, and pack garlic slivers under the fat layer.

Then i will be transferring it to an oven, in a glass 13x9 casserole dish, dry roasting it.

How long should i roast it for and at what temperature

I'm going to marinade the roast first. Marinate it with some Budweiser and stuff called Bone Suckin Sauce.

I take it i should wipe off the marinate completely before searing.

then after i sear, and let it cool, i can slide my garlic cloves under the fat layer, and season the piece of meat on both sides before putting it in the oven.
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Old 08-26-2006, 03:23 PM   #24
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Can i put a bed of onions under this roast will dry roasting it? or will that make the meat come out soggy from the steam?
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Old 08-26-2006, 03:31 PM   #25
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disregard that..im gonna cook it as a pot roast

there is a HUGE layer of fat on the topside to keep it tender...not to mention my beer + bone suckin sauce

i personally think i will turn this thing into a badass pot roast

if i fail, i will come here and eat crow.
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Old 08-26-2006, 04:31 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mish
Beth, I don't have an outdoor grill, so when I find a recipe I like, I use another cooking method. Re the weber - there are some excellent recipes and tips here:

http://www.weber.com/bbq/pub/recipe/menu.aspx

And the Santa Maria tri-tip recipe here:

http://www.weber.com/bbq/pub/recipe/...x?c=beef&r=195

Thanks mish and jkath, I think I can do the santa Maria recipe, does not look intimidating at all. And connie, thanks for the carmelizing onion recipe, I wonder if I can use that on one of the rib eye roasts? Trust me, I understand some cuts of meats are not pot roast material! But what other cuts of meat could be used for Connies recipe? But I am getting ahead of myself, do not have the least bit of confidence to pull the rib eye roasts from the freezer yet. btw, the chuck roast, pot roast, turned our heavenly today.
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Old 08-26-2006, 09:39 PM   #27
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Okaymy roast came out perfectly tender and delicious.

Tri tip sirloin is perfectly finefor pot roast.
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Old 08-27-2006, 09:40 AM   #28
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what about my roast did you guys expect to fail?

too dry and tough?

i don't see how, maybe my cut of tri tip was different?

it had a huge half inch layer of fat covering the entire bottom of the roast.

it was extremely tender and delicious.

lol did some of you just frown on me using a 10/lb cut of meat for a meager dish like pot roast?

the chuck had fantastic flavor, but it was annoying cutting around those big chunks of fat and gristle. childhood phobia i have from eating crappy steaks and biting into gristle(my mom was the worst cook)

Either way me my bro and my fiancee loved it.

I rubbed it with sea salt, cracked pepper, and seared it for 4 minutes a side.

then i let it cool, and cut slits, and jammed a bunch of garlic cloves in there.

then i rubbed it with thyme.

finally, i poured in about 6oz Bone Suckin Sauce(omg amazing)

and 12 oz beer.

the rest i used spring water to cover half the roast.

i also threw in a bunch of sauteed onion wedges and carrot chunks.

DELICIOUS!

im using it on corn tacos today.

thanks for all the feedback guys!

Cheers
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Old 08-27-2006, 10:59 AM   #29
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its me again... read this: http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/tritip1.html

It will teach you about tri-tip.

nuff said.....

IMNSHO you should marinate and grill the tritip. Then go get a nice pot roast...

OBTW if you want to add beer to a braise try a stout ot good porter...
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Old 08-27-2006, 11:02 AM   #30
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" OBTW if you want to add beer to a braise try a stout ot good porter..."

i used a stout last time. the flavor along with the BBQ sauce was overpowering.

I shred the meat and make enchildas tacos from my pot roasts.

the budweiser was much milder.
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