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Old 01-31-2012, 05:43 AM   #21
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Quote:
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I have fond memories of the summer kitchen. It's main purpose was for canning the fall harvest. But was used during the summer if it was too hot and didn't want to heat the house up from cooking.
Summer kitchens were much more common when people cooked on wood stoves. Can you imagine using a wood cook stove inside the house on a hot summer day?
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Old 01-31-2012, 05:50 AM   #22
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Summer kitchens were much more common when people cooked on wood stoves. Can you imagine using a wood cook stove inside the house on a hot summer day?
The whole thing would make me crazy!

Imagine before Colonel Sanders, you had to chase down a chicken and then the work began!

The monotony of eating the same few things over and over in the late winter!

Not for me!
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Old 01-31-2012, 06:40 AM   #23
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I still have bad images from watching some women on tv wring chicken necks.
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Old 01-31-2012, 07:39 AM   #24
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The whole thing would make me crazy!

Imagine before Colonel Sanders, you had to chase down a chicken and then the work began!

The monotony of eating the same few things over and over in the late winter!

Not for me!
I never like eating the canned veggies in the winter. I hated when the garden was done for the year.

I have a hysterical story about wringing the necks of chickens. Will tell it someday in another post.
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Old 01-31-2012, 08:20 AM   #25
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My house was built in 1872, and the kitchen was a small, separate building, about 10 feet away from the main house, connected by a covered walkway. I am actually sitting in the walkway now--the kitchen was connected to the house years ago, and the in-between space is now a bathroom and hall, with a little nook for the computer.

A separate kitchen not only kept the heat out of the main house, it minimized the danger of fire.
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Old 01-31-2012, 03:42 PM   #26
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I have a tiny kitchen, and a wall without any cabinets or coutners. So I got a wall mount pot rack for it and a kitchen cart to act as more counter space. I hated keeping my pots in a bottom cabinet. Much more accessible, and I have more storage for other things.
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Old 01-31-2012, 05:25 PM   #27
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I have a small, badly designed kitchen. The bare walls are now behind Ikea shelving. There is nowhere I could hang pots that DH wouldn't bump into them. I use the top of my portable dishwasher as an island.

I think my Copco enamelled CI pots are pretty enough that they are on open Ikea shelving. I would worry about the weight if I were put CI pots on a rack.
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Old 02-01-2012, 02:07 PM   #28
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Have any of you noticed in Lidia's kitchen all the beautiful copper pots she has hanging up? About four or five years ago, she took the viewer around the kitchen. That is her own home. When she was remodeling, she wanted to be able to cook in a familiar place where she was comfortable. Those pots hanging up, the built-in rotisserie, and a lot of other equipment she had imported from Italy. Across the ceiling are the lights and overhead cameras necessary for television broadcasting. Off to the side is the control room. But in front, where you imagine the cameraman to be, is an humongous dining room table. That too was imported from Italy. It is where the family gathers in true Italian style for Sunday dinners. She has a giant sideboard filled with beautiful imported dishes and service pieces. And what copper pots don't fit into her kitchen are hanging at the end in front of a beautiful large bay window. The racks in the kitchen are SS, the one in the dining room is large and copper like her pans. It is a kitchen to die for.
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Old 02-01-2012, 02:43 PM   #29
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I also ADORE my pot rack. It was custom made for me by a blacksmith in New Hampshire. At the time my place had 12 foot ceilings, so when I moved to my condo, he made new "hangers" for it to go with the much lower heights.

In fact, my kitchen has a dropped ceiling. When my handy man installed the pot rack, he went all the way up to the studs in the real ceiling so there would never be an issue with the weight on the rack.

Not everything fits on it... Some pans just don't have handles that allow them to hang. but in my 7 x 14 kitchen, my extensive cookware collection wouldn't have a chance without that pot rack.
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Old 02-01-2012, 03:01 PM   #30
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I also ADORE my pot rack. It was custom made for me by a blacksmith in New Hampshire. At the time my place had 12 foot ceilings, so when I moved to my condo, he made new "hangers" for it to go with the much lower heights.

In fact, my kitchen has a dropped ceiling. When my handy man installed the pot rack, he went all the way up to the studs in the real ceiling so there would never be an issue with the weight on the rack.

Not everything fits on it... Some pans just don't have handles that allow them to hang. but in my 7 x 14 kitchen, my extensive cookware collection wouldn't have a chance without that pot rack.
I once saw on one of those Sunday morning real estate shows a pot rack over an island across from the cooking area. But the rack was set back toward the middle of the island. You had to be really tall to reach for a pot. If it was too forward it would have been in the way of the work area. The only thing you could have hung from it would have been one quart pans. It really was badly placed. Someone didn't think that one out at all.
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