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Old 05-31-2012, 02:30 PM   #21
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It's fine to use dish soap and a scrubber on well-seasoned cast iron.

I do it all the time and my pieces are still very slick and shiny. I dont do it every time I wash them up, but sometimes there is too much gunk for water alone.

My mother put hers in the dishwasher once in awhile. I dont recommend that.
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Old 05-31-2012, 03:53 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
It's fine to use dish soap and a scrubber on well-seasoned cast iron.

I do it all the time and my pieces are still very slick and shiny. I dont do it every time I wash them up, but sometimes there is too much gunk for water alone.

My mother put hers in the dishwasher once in awhile. I dont recommend that.
I could be wrong, but I think the issue with soap is that it could soak in and make your food taste soapy.
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Old 05-31-2012, 04:55 PM   #23
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I could be wrong, but I think the issue with soap is that it could soak in and make your food taste soapy.

No, the concern is that the soap may remove some of the seasoning.
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Old 05-31-2012, 05:22 PM   #24
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When my ancestors left Virginny and traveled to the Territory.. arriving in the Spring of 1800 they brought with them cast iron cooking vessels. ~ Along the way had they stopped by a creek and washed their pots using what was common at the time...Lye soap (lard and lye from wood ashes) I have no doubt it would have harmed the finish/seasoning of the pots..Old granny knew this...So she didn't do it. ~~ That was then...and this is now. Today modern dish washing soaps.. Dawn, Joy, Palmolive etc... advertized as gentle to the modern housewife's hands... are mostly rinsing agents and pose no problems to well seasoned cast iron.

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Old 05-31-2012, 05:41 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I use coarse salt and a nylon scrubber to clean my CI pans, I also use a broomstalk brush--I've had it forever, I think I brought it home from Sweden a gazillion years ago. Once I'm happy with how clean the pan is, I wipe with paper towel, and heat up with a bit of oil in it after each use. I use CI a lot. I prefer it over SS for skillets. I also have a CI grill (a flat one) that I forgot I owned. It hasn't been seasoned (I used to use it for lefse), but now that I have an electric lefse griddle, I can re-purpose the griddle.
I use salt and a broomstalk brush too. It came with a wok set.
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Old 06-02-2012, 08:07 AM   #26
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Lye soap (lard and lye from wood ashes) I have no doubt it would have harmed the finish/seasoning of the pots..Old granny knew this...So she didn't do it. ~~ That was then...and this is now.
Usually the fat left over in the pan after frying meat, was mixed with the wood ashes, and THAT, is how soap was invented. The wood ash part when mixed with water is the chemically caustic part of the solution, when mixed with lard/fat, it changes (saponifies) and becomes soap. Given the right proportions, it will not even hurt your skin. Given the wrong proportions, it will eat through anything.

As a side note, I use homemade soap and haven't bought soap in 10 years. I've run out of dish soap, and found that homemade soap does a fabulous job on washing dishes in the sink--who's have thought that?

My cast iron frying pan lives in my oven (gas) covered in foil, and I cook it every time I use the oven. (even when it is not my cooking vessel)
If I see a BIT of burned on anything, or a BIT of rust (on the bottom maybe), I'll rub it hard with a metal scrubbie (I know no one will agree), then rinse, dry quickly, cover the surface of the pan with oil from an oil soaked cloth and bake it for 30 minutes at 400 degrees F. It's always ready to go.
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Old 06-02-2012, 12:03 PM   #27
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It seems to me that the burned on stuff is the coating, it's more or less carbonized fat. It's only a problem when it gets really thick. IMO a thin layer of burned on coating is good. That's the "seasoning" that washes off if you use soap or overly-aggressive mechanical methods.

I think that it's possible that some people are too aggressive in cleaning their iron cookware. If it has gobs and globs and chunks of burned on stuff that needs to be cleaned off. If it's a thin layer of burned on stuff that is what keeps food from sticking.

If food does not stick to your iron cookware then you are probably using it right and cleaning it right.
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Old 06-15-2012, 08:39 AM   #28
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Here's a link to a book on caring for and cooking with cast iron.

Cast-Iron Cooking - A. D. Livingston - Google Books
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Old 06-15-2012, 09:29 AM   #29
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Read what the guys who make it have to say:

Lodge Cast Iron Cookware - America's Original Cookware - South Pittsburg, TN USA
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Old 06-15-2012, 09:39 AM   #30
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I hide the CI skillet I use for my eggs when I'm not home--I guess one of my pet peeves is having to re-season the CI pans because s/one washed the pans in the dishwasher or with soap, but that little one is seasoned perfectly and I don't want s/one to ruin that. When I go to MN, I hide all the CI pans so s/one will use the SS pans instead. There are some arguments that just aren't worth the effort.
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