"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Knives
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-24-2008, 03:21 AM   #121
Senior Cook
 
jpaulg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Brisbane, Qld, Australia
Posts: 208
Of the videos on youtube, this is the one that I think is best for learning from. Not that I necessarily agree with everything the guy says but it conveys a lot of the ideas I was getting at:


Just be very careful looking for knife stuff on youtube as there are some completely deluded people who are posting vids of how good their skills are and want you to be just like them.
__________________

__________________
jpaulg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 06:32 AM   #122
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Thanks. What I usually do is look for someone to post a vid on one of the knife forums, then read what others have to say to see if it's credible.
__________________

__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 04:33 PM   #123
Senior Cook
 
jpaulg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Brisbane, Qld, Australia
Posts: 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
If you're telling me that I can't use my knife to cut open a package of Lit'l Smokies, or to cut the plastic wrap off of a package of chicken, when I'm using the same knife on a less than choice cutting board..... well, I just don't buy it. That's not the level of knife ownership I want to be at. I'm just trying to be honest. I want to pick up one knife to do most of my kitchen needs and if that means touching it up more, then I'll accept that.
Cardboard and paper products are very tough on edges so it's a good habit to not use good knives to open things, I know we all do it but if you get into the habit of avoiding it you'll keep your edges sharper for longer. What tissue paper does to eyeglasses is what cardboard does to a knife edge.

The easy way around it is to have a small "junk" knife handy that gets used for all those jobs. I have a paring knife specifically for opening boxes and plastic wraps, it also helps reduce cross contamination.
__________________
jpaulg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 06:53 PM   #124
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
JPG, I don't believe Kleenex or Scotties do much to most GLASS eyeglasses. A bird's beak parer is my preferred tool for removing most plasic film wrapping.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2008, 07:20 AM   #125
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Hey. They knocked over eight bucks off that knife I just bought. I think I'm going to browse for sales and pick up another Japanese blade. Maybe something around 10 inches.
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2008, 03:53 AM   #126
Senior Cook
 
jpaulg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Brisbane, Qld, Australia
Posts: 208
Getting a 10" or 12" blade would be interesting. I use a 6" Nakiri and a 9" chef's knife, which do 95% of my cutting without issues. Every now and again there are some jobs which I'd prefer a longer blade.

For me personally I'd step up to a 12" blade, probably a Carbon Steel Sabatier, but I can't justify the expense and don't have any more room in my knife case.
__________________
jpaulg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2008, 06:20 AM   #127
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
I have an 11.5" Sabatier chef's knife and find it's thick blade an asset. Comparing it to an 8 incher is like comparing a 22 inch chainsaw bar to a 14 incher.
My biggest problem with the long knife is not having a board big enough to complement it.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2008, 07:08 AM   #128
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
That's an interesting point, Bill, especially with my limited food prep area.....

I was using my new knife the other night to cut onions like in the vid and it seemed a longer blade would have been nice to have, especially when making the horizontal cuts. And it looked like the demonstrator was using a long bladed knife.

And I picked up one of my old chefs knives a couple days ago, too, and boy did it feel clunky, but sometimes I think I would like a little more mass to the Tojiro. I was thinking a slightly longer blade might give me the feel I'm looking for. I would like to keep to the same chefs style though and not get something totally different. I still want it to be a mulitasker.
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2008, 01:53 PM   #129
Senior Cook
 
jpaulg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Brisbane, Qld, Australia
Posts: 208
Sabatier style blades feel longer than German or Japanese blades because they have less belly and curve, so a 11.5" Sabatier would feel like using a 13" German style knife. If I pick up someone elses 8" Wusthof or Messermeister at work that it feels like I'm using a toothpick after using my 9" Sabatier.
__________________
jpaulg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2008, 02:56 PM   #130
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpaulg View Post
Sabatier style blades feel longer than German or Japanese blades because they have less belly and curve, so a 11.5" Sabatier would feel like using a 13" German style knife. If I pick up someone elses 8" Wusthof or Messermeister at work that it feels like I'm using a toothpick after using my 9" Sabatier.
Is the length measured straight line from quillon to tip, or along the edge's curve?
__________________

__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.