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Old 05-05-2009, 01:44 PM   #11
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my hardware store sharpens knives. Chef sharpens knives for us, too.
then you steel them pretty often.
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Old 05-05-2009, 05:20 PM   #12
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You might wan to check out-
Spyderco 701MF ProFile Set
- In combining man-made sapphires with a unique shape, we have created a tool diverse enough to be used by anyone from a machinist to a housewife. The Profile works wonders when deburring machined items. The elliptical shape translates into four distinct sharpening surfaces: A flat surface and large radius for plain edges, a small radius for serrated edges and a groove for pointed tips. Includes instructions and split leather pouch.
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Old 07-28-2009, 03:01 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Laury View Post
Truth be told (hola mi amiga Karen!) I'm a little afraid of "too sharp' knives. Maybe that's why I haven't really learned about this. A little dullness is probably a good idea for me! Besides, anytime i cook with someone else's knives - they are REALLY dull, so I feel like mine are just right.

The problem I have found is that dull knives just dont go where you want them to. the sharper the edge, the better the response of the knife.

When a knife is dull, you dont get so much slicing or cutting as you get kind of a "smash and wedge" action. granted for some things they dont need to be AS sharp, but if you are doing some fine slicing on anything tender such as fish, tomatoes, or anything of the like, the dull knives just mutilate what you are trying to cut.
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Old 07-28-2009, 04:23 PM   #14
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When we took a little trip a few months ago, the guy who house-sat for us also sharpened all of my knives while we were gone. Problem is, he didn't tell me! Quite a surprise the first time I used my chef's knife. I agree - sharp knives are probably safer, but how do I keep them that way? I have a sharpener that came with my set of knives, but Don's sharpening job was much much more effective.
Likely he used a stone. I'm not at all good with them, so I get my knives professionally ground once a year and keep the edges on them with my steel.

All the "knife people" I have ever met have told me never to use those sharpeners -- they will ruin your edge. If that's so, I don't know why all the knife companies sell them.
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Old 07-28-2009, 04:32 PM   #15
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there are a few systems out there that line your knives up so you are at the right angle. diamond stones then form the edge. A diamond hone or steel is then your regular tool for keeping it sharp. You never have to draw the knife through under heavy pressure. there are several videos out there if you search for them on you tube, including ones by Gordon Ramsey and Keith Snow. How to use a stone and how to use a steel.
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Old 07-28-2009, 06:48 PM   #16
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Likely he used a stone. I'm not at all good with them, so I get my knives professionally ground once a year and keep the edges on them with my steel.

All the "knife people" I have ever met have told me never to use those sharpeners -- they will ruin your edge. If that's so, I don't know why all the knife companies sell them.
ChefJune, I don't understand that either. If the electric or manual guides the manufacturers sell are so bad for them.. why do they sell them?
I've just been debating on getting either the 15/20 electric sharpener or the Shun sharpener for the Shuns and a separate one for the Germans.

I know, I know.. I'm going to hear to get stones or an apex.. honestly though, I don't foresee myself taking the time to learn that skill.

Does anyone have experience with the 15/20 Chef's Choice or the Shun specific electric sharpeners?
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Old 07-28-2009, 08:57 PM   #17
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ChefJune, I don't understand that either. If the electric or manual guides the manufacturers sell are so bad for them.. why do they sell them?
The electric sharpeners are very aggressive and take off way more metal than needed. This is great for the knife companies because you will need to buy new knives sooner.

Learning to use the apex, for instance, takes a short while (sharpening one knife will do it), and takes much longer than using an electric, but the results are MUCH better. You will get a much sharper final product and you get to pick the angle you want instead of using a preset angle. Of course the apex will cost a pretty penny, but I think it is worth it. It is not for everyone though.

Bottom line, if you like the results you get from an electric then there is nothing wrong with using one.
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Old 07-29-2009, 03:32 AM   #18
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With the right kind of hone (steel) you can generally touch up serrated knives. IMO only a ceramic or diamond hone is of much use on serrated knives, and then you have to go very lightly on the back side. Knives that are serrated on both sides are basically disposable- when they dull too much to cut well, discard them and get another Shappu 2000.

If you have a good serrated knife that you want to sharpen, there are small abrasive rods you can use to 'file' each serration individually. I'd rather watch grass grow but it can be done.

The best type of serration, IMO, is the scalloped edge used by Mac, Shun and perhaps others. This type can be sharpened, either with stones or certain types of pull thru sharpeners. I advise that people avoid the latter with one notable exception (the Edgemaker Pro- this one will do a good job on many serrated knives).

If it's already dull there's no harm in trying the steel. If you have access to sharpening stones, you can try them. Your best shot is just lightly doing the back side.
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