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Old 12-05-2011, 01:13 PM   #1
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I was just in Home Depot over the weekend and saw they are carrying bags of mixed split logs (hickory, oak and pecan) for $4.47 each. I believe they are 20lb bags. For me in south Florida, split logs are not an everyday thing.

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Old 12-05-2011, 01:45 PM   #2
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I was just in Home Depot over the weekend and saw they are carrying bags of mixed split logs (hickory, oak and pecan) for $4.47 each. I believe they are 20lb bags. For me in south Florida, split logs are not an everyday thing.

Craig
Man, I just gave away an entire cut up Oak tree to one of my neighbors who has a wood heater.

I still have about 10 trees to take out. All oak.
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Old 12-05-2011, 01:54 PM   #3
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Man, I just gave away an entire cut up Oak tree to one of my neighbors who has a wood heater.

I still have about 10 trees to take out. All oak.
This stuff is seasoned (dried) which I'm used to cooking with. I've never tried just cut stuff. Anybody ever use "green" logs/sticks? If it works well, you could make some folks real happy!

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Old 12-05-2011, 02:14 PM   #4
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This stuff is seasoned (dried) which I'm used to cooking with. I've never tried just cut stuff. Anybody ever use "green" logs/sticks? If it works well, you could make some folks real happy!

Craig
Yep, the guy who got the wood stacks it until the following year. Green wood burns cooler and faster than dried wood.
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Old 12-05-2011, 02:28 PM   #5
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I believe green wood burns cooler and slower. Most of the heat value in green wood goes to evaporating the moisture in the wood. Once that happens, the wood burns to ash.
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Old 12-05-2011, 03:34 PM   #6
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I believe green wood burns cooler and slower. Most of the heat value in green wood goes to evaporating the moisture in the wood. Once that happens, the wood burns to ash.
That is what I understand. I think you get more creosote in your chimney with green wood, as well.
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Old 12-05-2011, 04:33 PM   #7
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That is what I understand. I think you get more creosote in your chimney with green wood, as well.
I thought that you only got creosote from conifirs (evergreens) and not from hard or fruit woods?

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Old 12-05-2011, 04:45 PM   #8
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I thought that you only got creosote from conifirs (evergreens) and not from hard or fruit woods?

Craig
You get more creosote from conifers. Technically, it's cresote and carbon black, the stuff that coats the inside of chimneys.
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Old 12-05-2011, 04:52 PM   #9
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Just make sure that when using oak for a Q-fire, you use white oak. Red oak produces a bitter flavor due to the high amount of tannic acid in the wood. Think of biting into a red oak acorn. It's so bitter that it's inedible, at least until you boil the tannins out of it.

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Old 12-05-2011, 08:23 PM   #10
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Creosote is a product of incomplete combustion of all woods. Burning green wood promotes the formation of creosote. Evergreen wood that is thoroughly dried will burn safely.
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