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Old 02-26-2017, 02:44 PM   #51
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Maybe not, but it sure tastes better than the pasteurized milk.
Okay, but the topic was organic food. CD said he likes organic milk and you said, "I'm with you."
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Old 02-26-2017, 08:10 PM   #52
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I haven't had fresh, "sqozen" from the cow milk in over a half century, since I visited my great grandfather's farm in central California. First and last time I milked a cow myself.

Can't say I was impressed. But I can say everybody should try milking a cow at least once in their life.

Thanks but I'll take my 2% in a bottle with a sell-by date.
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Old 02-26-2017, 10:06 PM   #53
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Raw, unpasteurized milk is not necessarily organic.
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Maybe not, but it sure tastes better than the pasteurized milk.
The flavor is more dependent on what the cow eats rather than whether the milk is organic/non-organic or pasteurized/non-pasteurized. When our favorite dairy was still bottling just its own milk, rather than blending it with the milk from other farms, it was very rich and tasty. So rich, in fact, that when Goober was visiting us he would take from whichever milk bottle had more in it. At that time, Himself was drinking "rich-and-creamy" 2% and I drank skim. After Goober put the bottle back he sipped his milk, opened the fridge door and took the bottle he poured from out, and looked at me. "THIS is skim? REALLY skim?" He was surprised that it actually had a great flavor!

Since the dairy now sells the blended milk, Himself and I both drink 2%. From the grocery store. Not as good as that skim. *sigh*
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Old 02-26-2017, 10:53 PM   #54
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Considering these were cows that were raised from a calf to having a calf of their own, and spending most of their growing days out to pasture once they stopped nursing, I would say they were dang close to organic as possible. The only time they spent in the barn was for milking. Once in the morning and outdoors they went. Come back in at five p.m. for their second milking. Even in the winter. You don't even have to go out and bring them in for that second milking. Their bags are quite full. To the extent that some of them will be dragging on the ground. These cows seem to have a built-in clock. Come springtime when the majority of the calves are born, the cows do not like to come in so readily. They would rather drop their calf out in the field.

The calves are only allowed to nurse for the first 48 hours. They need that colostrum. To allow them to nurse any longer, ruins the teats. That is where the 4-H kid takes over. They give the calf their feedings by bottle from then on. If the cow drops a bull, depending on their lineage, they head to the fair to be sold. If not, off to the slaughter house. One of my kids sold her three month old bull for $10,000.00. She cried her eyes out. There was no consoling her. She helped deliver that critter and bottle fed him faithfully.

And lesson #1 if you live on a farm or ranch. Never name an animal unless it has lineage.
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Old 02-26-2017, 11:03 PM   #55
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...And lesson #1 if you live on a farm or ranch. Never name an animal unless it has lineage.
Nope. Lesson Number One is "don't name the animal if you'll end up eating it". Then again, I suppose it's OK to call a steer "Pot Roast" or a pig "HAMilton".
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Old 02-27-2017, 10:04 AM   #56
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Nope. Lesson Number One is "don't name the animal if you'll end up eating it". Then again, I suppose it's OK to call a steer "Pot Roast" or a pig "HAMilton".
Now you sound like Pirate. He would name them Primeribs and Hambone. He has a girlfriend in NH that owns her own farm. She is always trying to get him to move there. As soon as he mentions the names he has picked out for her animals, she drops the subject.
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Old 02-27-2017, 02:26 PM   #57
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I can appreciate the concept of not not becoming friends with your food.
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Old 02-27-2017, 03:14 PM   #58
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Grilled pork chop, mashed potato, microwaved cabbage, boiled peas and sweetcorn, followed by strawberry yogurt.

Gillian
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