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Old 11-17-2011, 04:06 PM   #21
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Looks like the old "Roast and Boast" bags popular back in the eighties. I thought it was just a fad.
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Old 11-17-2011, 04:23 PM   #22
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Thanks bakechef, how big are they (in gallons)?
There is no size written on the package at all, not in gallons or inches. I took them out of the bag and measured them, they are 23" (top to bottom) and 19" (side to side). They are quite big.

Here they are in the package.


Here they are out of the package. The cup in the center is a 1/4 cup measure so you can have some idea of scale.


These seem very sturdy, they have a double zip at the top.
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Old 11-17-2011, 04:36 PM   #23
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From Get more out of it!
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ZiplocŪ Brand Big Bags are available in three big sizes:
  • L equivalent to 3 Gallon (11.4L) 1.25 FT. x 1.25 FT. (38.1cm x 38.1cm) 5ct.
  • XL equivalent to 10 Gallon (37.8L) 2 FT. x 1.7 FT. (60cm x 51 cm) 4ct.
  • XXL equivalent to 20 Gallon (75.7L) 2 FT. x 2.7 FT. (60cm x 82 cm) 3ct.
They also say you can store food in them but to not use them in the microwave or oven.
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Old 11-17-2011, 04:56 PM   #24
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I found out that Market Basket has a 2 1/2 gallon bucket in there bakery. They said they'd give me one.

Anyone have any experience with Nature's Place Turkeys? I guess there all natural fresh turkey's that Hannaford said would be good for brining. They claim all there other turkeys (hannaford brand, butter ball etc... don't need to be brined). I know others have mentioned brining regardless. I also got family who think you HAVE to buy butterball or else Thanksgiving will be ruined.
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Old 11-17-2011, 05:12 PM   #25
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I found out that Market Basket has a 2 1/2 gallon bucket in there bakery. They said they'd give me one.

Anyone have any experience with Nature's Place Turkeys? I guess there all natural fresh turkey's that Hannaford said would be good for brining. They claim all there other turkeys (hannaford brand, butter ball etc... don't need to be brined). I know others have mentioned brining regardless. I also got family who think you HAVE to buy butterball or else Thanksgiving will be ruined.
Nature's Place is Hannaford's (and sister stores) store brand of all natural and/or organic products. This should be a good quality product, and a decent choice if you want an all natural bird.

You can brine that or any other turkey, doesn't really matter if it is injected.

2 1/2 gallon will be a bit small, unless you are doing just a breast. Ask if they have a big one, maybe the size that 35lb. icing comes in. I think those are 5 or more gallons.
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:21 AM   #26
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Is anyone trying dry-brining this year? I rubbed my turkey down with a salt mixture I made by buzzing up salt, some sugar, fresh herbs and orange zest. This was on Sunday, and it's supposed to sit until Wednesday morning, when I'll flip it over (breast side) down to finish.

When it's done, there should be no salt visible (it gets absorbed) and then you're supposed to put the bird in the fridge, uncovered, overnight so the skin dries out.

I decided to give this a go after agonizing over brining and contradictory information (how much, how long, etc). I'm using one of those XXL ziploc bags to hold the dry brined bird for now. Has anyone tried this?
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:32 AM   #27
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I also got family who think you HAVE to buy butterball or else Thanksgiving will be ruined.
I had to laugh at this because when I told my mother in law I bought an organic turkey I could see her look of disapproval even over the phone LOL She thinks Butterballs are the end-all-be-all of turkeys. Now hopefully I can prove her wrong
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:48 AM   #28
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I think it is interesting that the point of this discussion seems to be "the health factor of the devise used to apply poison to the turkey".
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:51 AM   #29
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I think it is interesting that the point of this discussion seems to be "the health factor of the devise used to apply poison to the turkey".

You must be using the wrong ingredients.
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:00 AM   #30
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Brine is primarily salt which is one of our most abused poisons.
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:05 AM   #31
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Brine is primarily salt which is one of our most abused poisons.
Please take your negativity elsewhere. Almost all of the negative press salt has recently received is over-exaggerated. Salt is a healthy and necessary part of all diets and, like all things, is perfectly fine in moderation.

To call salt a "poison" is so beyond ignorant, I don't even know why I'm responding.
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:07 AM   #32
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Brine is primarily salt which is one of our most abused poisons.

I consider your position on salt as extreme and not based in reality. Salt consumed in reasonable quantities is essential to human life and improves the taste of food.
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:52 AM   #33
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Can we get back to the topic? I'm interested in people's brining techniques and if anyone has tried dry-brining.
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:57 AM   #34
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Can we get back to the topic? I'm interested in people's brining techniques and if anyone has tried dry-brining.

I have not tried dry brining on poultry. Tried it once on steaks and must have overdone it as they were very salty.

I have been using the Good Eats/Alton Brown brining process/recipe for a while and have had excellent results.
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Old 11-22-2011, 11:01 AM   #35
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I did find a contradiction... Alton said at some point in an interview you can brine longer than a day by cutting back the salt content, say from 1 cup to 1/2 cup, and just brining for longer.

But Americas Test Kitchen claims that any brine that isn't full strength doesn't work, no matter how long you brine.
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Old 11-22-2011, 11:27 AM   #36
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I did find a contradiction... Alton said at some point in an interview you can brine longer than a day by cutting back the salt content, say from 1 cup to 1/2 cup, and just brining for longer.

But Americas Test Kitchen claims that any brine that isn't full strength doesn't work, no matter how long you brine.

Since salt creates the chemical reaction (I am oversimplifying) I believe you need a certain amount of salt to effect the change in the proteins.

Exactly how much, I don't know.

But I have heard from several sources that you should not cut back much on the amount of salt you use. I never have.

I have dry brined chicken (The Zuni Cafe roast chicken recipe -- fabulous) with excellent results and dry brined a turkey breast but never dry brined my Thanksgiving turkey since everyone loves them JUST AS IS and would kill me if it was different So i wet brine 2 big birds.

I will say that it seems like a common misconception that dry brining is mess-free, when it isn't.
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:27 PM   #37
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It is nice not having the bucket-o-brine in the fridge, although I was prepared for it. The 16 lb turkey I got was a little on the big and bulky side. Dry brining is the perfect thanksgiving experiment to test out on my in-laws, lol. If it doesn't turn out so great, meh, I'll wet brine next year!

Bonus: Here's a great video from Alton Brown and lifehacker on properly carving a turkey: How to Properly Carve a Turkey
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:35 PM   #38
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My first bucket is going onto the front porch tonight. I have two fridges but never have enough room to brine in them.
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:40 PM   #39
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My first bucket is going onto the front porch tonight. I have two fridges but never have enough room to brine in them.
I think you really want to brine below 40°.
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:47 PM   #40
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Effington... SILF?


Too funny.
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