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Old 06-06-2006, 05:05 AM   #21
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By the way, my husband DID go to a diabetes counsellor -- a nurse practicioner dietician. I could-have-should-have gone as well, but when he was diagnosed with high cholesterol I went to a dietician for him and she didn't know as much about nutrition as I did, was more overweight than both of us put togehter, and simply dismised any questions I had about new products on the market. So this time I passed on it. I say 'thank you mom & dad" because I was raised with good nutrition. My husband's diabetes has been very easily (at this point) controlled by diet and exercise .... because I was already cooking healthy food. He's just had to control how much of it he eats and when he eats it. Wine and beer have all but disappeared (it counts as carbs) but his beloved scotch is OK. When he wants beer or wine, it counts and he counts it. Also he'll carefuly measure out a bloody mary, and count THAT as his afternoon snack occaisionally. We both realize that diabetes is a snowball going downhill. We're putting off insulin for as long as we possibly can.

I heard on the radio that they are doing tests for athsmetic diabetics for an inhaler that also delivers insulin. Interesting. Anyone know anything about it? (Yes, hubby is also athsmatic).
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Old 06-08-2006, 08:48 AM   #22
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Some more bad news;

Last week I went to the doctor's office for my annual physical exam. The blood test results came in the mail yesterday, and it says that my blood sugar level is high.

The doc wrote on the bottom of the letter saying that I've been diagnosed with early diabetes.

Does anyone know what the treatment is for having too much sugar in the blood? I know that insulin shots or pills is taken for people who don't have enough sugar in the blood system. What is the treatment for those who have too much?

I made an appointment to see him (tomorrow) as he suggests.


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Old 06-08-2006, 02:29 PM   #23
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The role of insulin in the body
The main job of insulin is to keep the amount of sugar in the bloodstream within a normal range. Here's what happens during digestion:
- After eating a snack or a meal, sugar and other nutrients enter the bloodstream as the body digests food.
- Carbohydrates, protein and fats are three types of nutrients found in food. Although all three affect the amount of sugar in the bloodstream, carbohydrates affect it the most.
  • Protein is essential for building and maintaining your muscles, bones, organs and other tissues and to keep your body functioning.
  • Fat is important for vital body functions such as making hormones, building cell walls and storing energy.
  • Carbohydrates provide the quickest form of energy--they are converted into glucose, or blood sugar, when they reach your bloodstream.
- During digestion, carbohydrates break down into sugar and enter the bloodstream in the form of glucose, a simple sugar.

- The pancreas responds to this rise in the amount of sugar in the bloodstream by producing insulin.

- Insulin must be present in the bloodstream to allow sugar — the body's main energy supply — into the body's tissues.

Insulin also influences the liver, which plays a key role in maintaining normal blood sugar levels. After eating, when insulin levels are high, the liver accepts and stores extra sugar in the form of glycogen. Between meals, when insulin levels are low, the liver releases glycogen into the bloodstream in the form of sugar, keeping blood sugar levels within a narrow and normal range.

When your body notices that the sugar level is elevated, it is a sign that you have more sugar than you need right now, your body is not burning it and therefore it is accumulating in your blood. So insulin is released to take that sugar and store it. How does it store it? Glycogen? Your body stores very little glycogen at any one time. All the glycogen stored in your liver and muscles would not last you through 1 active day. Once you have filled up your glycogen stores, that sugar is stored as saturated fat.

So the idea of medical professionals recommending a high complex-carbohydrate, low-saturated-fat diet is absolutely a mistake. A high complex-carbohydrate diet is nothing more than a high-glucose diet, or a high-sugar diet. Your body is just going to store it as saturated fat, and the body makes it into saturated fat quite readily. Insulin normally allows body tissues, such as the muscles, to take up the blood sugar glucose, the body's prime energy source. In those with diabetes due to a lack of normal insulin or insulin resistance, blood sugar rises, a condition that can lead to tissue damage.

Your body's principal way of getting rid of sugar, because it is toxic, is to burn it. The sugar which your body can't burn will be rid of by storing it as glycogen, and when those glycogen reserves are full, sugar gets stored as fat. If you eat sugar your body will burn it and you stop burning fat. Another major effect of insulin on fat is it prevents you from burning it. What happens when you are insulin resistant and you have all this insulin floating around all the time? You wake up in the morning with an insulin level of 90.

Treatment at this stage is to improve your diet to include more fresh fruits and veggies, more whole grains and lean proteins & less sugary foods and highly processed carbohydrates. Exercise daily will help keep your body and muscles active.
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Old 06-08-2006, 02:47 PM   #24
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Thanks for the heads-up.

This ia all new to me. Like I said in an earlier post in this thread, two of my brothers had developed the disease. One of them died and the other is still alive.

So now, I gotta try to set an example for him. I should know a little bit more on this when I see my doctor tomorrow.


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Old 06-08-2006, 03:10 PM   #25
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Corey, it was my understanding that you need the insulin to help get rid of the sugar in your blood. So you would need to have insulin.

The good news is that if you regulate your diet and exercise, often you can minimize the amount of insulin you need. Some folks can even do without insulin when they are very strict with their diet and exercise.

Forgive me if I am repeating info you already have. I tend to skim very long posts when I am short of time and go back to read them all later. Best of luck.
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Old 06-08-2006, 03:29 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
Corey, it was my understanding that you need the insulin to help get rid of the sugar in your blood. So you would need to have insulin.

The good news is that if you regulate your diet and exercise, often you can minimize the amount of insulin you need. Some folks can even do without insulin when they are very strict with their diet and exercise.

Forgive me if I am repeating info you already have. I tend to skim very long posts when I am short of time and go back to read them all later. Best of luck.
Alix,
Corey, might not need insulin if he is still producing his own. What happens is the cells become insulin resistant and don't do their job. We now have drugs that help increase the insulin our cells use. This along with a insulin stimulator such as amaryl which forces the pancreas to produce insulin usually get the job done. If Corey's doc is up on these meds he might suggest them, as time goes on the stimulator somethines can be lowered or dropped, once under tight control some are able to control with diet and exercise alone.
Hang in there Corey, read, read, read,!!! And get a meter and strips and test for all your worth.

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Old 06-08-2006, 04:08 PM   #27
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I think your link sould be changed. I have changed it in the exaple in your quote. It should work now...
Thanks. How odd. I had copied and pasted that link from an email I had from the group, and it worked when I first posted it. I retyped it in now (exactly the same as what was there), and it works again now. Weird.

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Old 06-08-2006, 07:24 PM   #28
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Lady C, that was quite informative.

Thing with my daughter is, that she was eating so many sweets and starches, that even a normal insulin level wouldn't have been able to handle it.

But she wasn't normal. Diabetes runs in her dad's family.

Don't get me wrong...I'm not glad she's been diagnosed with this disease. But I have been so worried about her health, because of her size and mental attitude, that I am glad that something has finally happened to call her attention to taking care of herself.



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Old 06-09-2006, 05:46 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
Lady C, that was quite informative.

Thing with my daughter is, that she was eating so many sweets and starches, that even a normal insulin level wouldn't have been able to handle it.

But she wasn't normal. Diabetes runs in her dad's family.

Don't get me wrong...I'm not glad she's been diagnosed with this disease. But I have been so worried about her health, because of her size and mental attitude, that I am glad that something has finally happened to call her attention to taking care of herself.
Ignorance may be bliss, but it is not healthy. Before I knew I was diabetic, I used to drink full-sugar soda, especially root beer. When somone near me would opt for a sugar free version, I would look at the foam disapearing on the top and state; "This is my version of diet pop. When the foam is gone, I'll have less to drink than a full glass, and it tastes a lot better than your diet pop."

Just before I was diagnosed, I did something unusual for me. I purchased a quart container of chocolate milk, intending to take it home. But before leaving the store parking lot, I opened the carton and took a sip. It tasted soooo good. And then, before I left the parking lot, there was no chocolate milk left in the carton. I bought another carton and took it home for the family.

I was never one to eat a lot of sweets, or drink a lot of pop. But occasionally, I'd indulge. Coupe those occasional indulgences with starchy potatoes, processed grains, etc., etc... There is no doubt in my mind that my ignorance about sound nutrition had a major role in my becoming a type-2 diabetic at age 40.

That is why I rarely make rich, starchy or sweet foods, though I know how to make them way too well. I have found that I enjoy healthier foods just as much, and now prefer the flavors of whole grains, nuts, and fresh fruits and veggies over the highly porcessed versions that I consumed for forty years of my life. But I still enjoy the flavor of cooked animal fat more than I should. That fat on the outside of a charcoal grilled steak has amazing flavor. But I gridgingly give it to the dog .

For anyone reading this thread, remember, teaching children to enjoy wholesome foods starts in the womb. What you eat is tasted by your child, through the flavors secreted in the amniotic fluid. That child develops memories in the womb that is carried into life at birth.

Teaching and giving your kids sound nutrition will help them throughout their lives. And as always, example is the best teacher. If you want your kids to enjoy better health, eat healthy foods yourself. If you don't give them that knowledge , and help them develop a taste for a wide variety of foods, you are cheating them, and actually doing them harm. And I suspect from the caliber of people on this site, that there is not a parent or grandparent in the group that wouldn't give their children and grandchildren every advantage in life that they could.

I wish I'd known what I know now, twenty years ago. I might not be diabetic if I had.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 06-09-2006, 06:00 PM   #30
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Don't we all wish we had known earlier. Diabetes is on my side of the family, but I haven't been diagnosed even though I do have neuropathy in my feet. My dh was diagnosed a few months ago even tho he is not overweight nor does his family have any history of diabetes. We are both doing the carb counting as directed by his educator and exercising a lot. I have lost 14 lbs and my bp was 116/60 which is down but I'm hoping to lose a few more lbs.
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