"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Health, Nutrition and Special Diets
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-31-2008, 10:14 PM   #21
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
There's about 100 calories in a pound of mussels - If you cook them in wine and other stuff it will go up
__________________

__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2008, 10:25 PM   #22
Chef Extraordinaire
 
suziquzie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: MN
Posts: 11,488
Send a message via AIM to suziquzie
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf View Post
There's about 100 calories in a pound of mussels - If you cook them in wine and other stuff it will go up
__________________

__________________
Not that there's anything wrong with that.....
suziquzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2008, 11:10 PM   #23
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystic View Post
I don't think there's any exact answer to this. Everybody is different and will have different needs. Also, training programs are different and will produce different results in different people. With that said, we are left with general guidelines such as eat an extra 3500 calories to gain a pound (hopefully mostly muscle but there will be some fat).

.. I've known people who can add lean pounds easily and others who would eat everything in sight and never gain a pound.
Sure there will be some ppl that are extremes, but if there is a typical guide for a pound of fat I figure there should be one for muscle. It seems odd to me we just use the same advice for muscle gain as we do fat when one seems to require much more energy than the other.
__________________
schnarf. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2008, 11:19 PM   #24
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,405
If you consume 3500 more calories than your body uese, you gain a pound. As you are not using these calories, your body stores it as fat.

If you consume 3500 added calories and increase your exercise levels to burn an additional 3500 calories, your body won't store it as fat but use it to fuel your additional exercise, whih results in more muscle.

Following this process, I don't think you can calculate how much muscle you will gain as a result. It may be a pound or much less. There are a lot of variables that would effect the efficiency with which individual bodies work to build muscle.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2008, 11:38 PM   #25
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
If you consume 3500 more calories than your body uese, you gain a pound. As you are not using these calories, your body stores it as fat.

If you consume 3500 added calories and increase your exercise levels to burn an additional 3500 calories, your body won't store it as fat but use it to fuel your additional exercise, whih results in more muscle.

Following this process, I don't think you can calculate how much muscle you will gain as a result. It may be a pound or much less. There are a lot of variables that would effect the efficiency with which individual bodies work to build muscle.
That wouldn't work. If you burn 3500extra and eat 3500 extra there is no weight gain. You need to eat more than you need to gain weight, be that weight fat or muscle. I am a weightlifter, I have figured over the years how much I need to stay the same or gain lose/weight. I'm just interested in a typical figure for muscle gain as there is one for fat, and with a guide for muscle, I'd also like to know how that was calculated. Also, we don't need to consider individuals' variables, we can just make the statement that whatever an individual requires if he/she eats 3500cals more than he/she can use (be that for maintenance or used in building muscle) he/she will then gain a pound of fat. You see we don't need to know someone's needs, we still have the guide that 3500 makes a pound of fat, but we have no such value for muscle, just guides that say eat a little extra and try not to gain more than x amount of weight or more will be fat. Oh well....
__________________
schnarf. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2008, 12:16 AM   #26
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by schnarf. View Post
Sure there will be some ppl that are extremes, but if there is a typical guide for a pound of fat I figure there should be one for muscle. It seems odd to me we just use the same advice for muscle gain as we do fat when one seems to require much more energy than the other.
And, that is where you are missing the point ... fat is accumulated from excess calories - muscle is built thru work, some calories fuel the muscles' needs to perform the exercise and some provide the building blocks to build muscle during the recovery period.

Now, stop and think about this for a minute ... IF there was a magic formula of how many calories to eat to gain x pounds of lean muscle mass ... every guy could sit on the couch, watch TV, and look like Arnold or Lou without ever breaking a sweat! Joe Weider would certainly have already patented it and put it in a can if that was possible.

Sorry, dude - it doesn't work that way. And, FWIW - two guys starting out at the same weight and size - eating the same diet and exercising the same will not have the same muscle building results.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2008, 12:45 AM   #27
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
And, that is where you are missing the point ... fat is accumulated from excess calories - muscle is built thru work, some calories fuel the muscles' needs to perform the exercise and some provide the building blocks to build muscle during the recovery period.

Now, stop and think about this for a minute ... IF there was a magic formula of how many calories to eat to gain x pounds of lean muscle mass ... every guy could sit on the couch, watch TV, and look like Arnold or Lou without ever breaking a sweat! Joe Weider would certainly have already patented it and put it in a can if that was possible.

Sorry, dude - it doesn't work that way. And, FWIW - two guys starting out at the same weight and size - eating the same diet and exercising the same will not have the same muscle building results.

I didn't say I wasn't lifting. I still don't know why there's no figure for muscle or if it really is the same as fat give/take, how they calculated it.
__________________
schnarf. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2008, 12:59 AM   #28
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by schnarf. View Post
I didn't say I wasn't lifting. I still don't know why there's no figure for muscle or if it really is the same as fat give/take, how they calculated it.
The reason there is no figure for "claories consumed = muscle mass increase" like there is for "3,500 excess calories consumed = 1 lb fat" is because they are not the same things.

As I said before - fat is accumulated - muscle is built - and building muscle depends on a lot of factors other than just calories.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2008, 02:01 AM   #29
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
The reason there is no figure for "claories consumed = muscle mass increase" like there is for "3,500 excess calories consumed = 1 lb fat" is because they are not the same things.

As I said before - fat is accumulated - muscle is built - and building muscle depends on a lot of factors other than just calories.

I could say the same thing about fat. Eating an excess of cals doesn't necessarily equate to a particular amount of fat bcz of different metabolisms, yet, we still have a figure for a guesstimate. I don't see a reasonable difference, they're both subject to variance as a result of individual body types. Bodytype suggests both disposition toward fat gain/loss and muscle gain/loss. What other factors are there?
__________________
schnarf. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2008, 12:09 AM   #30
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by schnarf. View Post
I could say the same thing about fat. Eating an excess of cals doesn't necessarily equate to a particular amount of fat bcz of different metabolisms, yet, we still have a figure for a guesstimate.
Yeah, you could say that - but look again at what you just said, it's wrong (as stated). Excess calories are those comsumed above those metabolized. What makes a difference in whether the excess calories goes to fat or muscle depends on the source of the calories, amount of calories consumed at one time and frequency, number of feedings per day, and exercise (intensity and duration).

Quote:
Originally Posted by schnarf. View Post
I don't see a reasonable difference, they're both (subject to variance as a result of individual body types. Bodytype suggests both disposition toward fat gain/loss and muscle gain/loss. What other factors are there?
You, and some other previous posters, want an exact (guesstimate) number of calories required to gain 1-Lb of lean muscle so here it is - 3,500 calories.

How many calories you need to consume is fairly simple to calculate:

(your body weight x (100 - % body fat) x exercise factor) + 750

Exercise factors:
11 if you do little or no exercise at all
13 if you do light exercise (1 to 2 hours per week) (most of us)
15 if you do moderate exercise (3 to 5 hours per week)
17 if you do heavy exercise (6 or more hours per week)
19 if you do heavy body-building exercise (8-10 or more hours per week)

Nutrition: The source of the calories, how many are consumed at one time, when they are consumed, the number of times you eat per day - these are some other factors that make the difference between gaining fat and building muscle from the same number of calories.

There are sites devoted to body building that go into greater detail - if you're really curious you can google them. I thought I posted a couple of links - oops I DID ... you might want to back up and read them. FYI: I don't waste the time to look-up and post links to sites unless they are relevant.
__________________

__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.