"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Health, Nutrition and Special Diets
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-12-2008, 05:30 PM   #61
Sous Chef
 
GhettoRacingKid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 943
But I dont think there are many single income homes now a days.

From my observing on this thread and board I think alot of the people who cook healthier have a better knowledge of cooking and all that is involved with it.

It could come down to just needing to learn how to cook better and how to use cheap ingredints that are in season to make healthy flavorful meals.

I know before I really got into the cooking thing i used to eat garbage and alot of it.

Now I eat alot of smaller tastier meals that are cheaper that are pretty healthy.

I just got a problem with snacking on the bad stuff.
__________________

__________________
Genius is sparked by other peoples ideas.
GhettoRacingKid is offline  
Old 09-12-2008, 05:35 PM   #62
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Quote:
But I dont think there are many single income homes now a days.
You're kidding, right? Not many single moms or single dads or single elderly folks where you are in good old Long Island? (By the way, I was born & raised there.) You're just not looking hard enough.
__________________

__________________
BreezyCooking is offline  
Old 09-12-2008, 05:41 PM   #63
Sous Chef
 
GhettoRacingKid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 943
there are single people and alot of them are struggling to get by.

Long island I think is a special case because alot of people have the cash.

look at the taxes, housing costs and etc...

Where about on good old LI?
__________________
Genius is sparked by other peoples ideas.
GhettoRacingKid is offline  
Old 09-12-2008, 05:53 PM   #64
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,184
Quote:
From my observing on this thread and board I think alot of the people who cook healthier have a better knowledge of cooking and all that is involved with it.

But not everyone has this opportunity.
__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline  
Old 09-12-2008, 05:54 PM   #65
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
I'm from Setauket & my husband is from St. James. And yes, I know - both big-money areas now, but not so much when we were growing up there.

Family is still there & we keep up with area news, but even in the "high rent" areas of the East End where we spent lots of our time there are many people struggling these days. Lord - just look at the plight of the fishermen alone. Not to mention the elderly. Not the "rich" elderly - the normal fixed-income elderly.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline  
Old 09-12-2008, 05:55 PM   #66
Executive Chef
 
VeraBlue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: northern NJ
Posts: 3,683
Quote:
Originally Posted by GhettoRacingKid View Post
Vera,

I agree with you on that but alot of school have the sports and other after school activities for no cost since its in the school budget.

.
Not trying to make this a 'school budget' tangent...and perhaps things on Long Island are different...but in most urban areas, where incomes tend to be lower, most schools haven't seen a budget pass since the 70s. When I was growing up, we had art, music, library, home ec, shop, and gym, twice a week each. Schools still have libraries, but you don't get classes on how to use them any longer. Art, music, home ec and shop are all gone. Gym, once every day, is now once a week. After school programs are babysitting programs, not physical fitness programs, and you have to pay a hefty amount of money to utilize them. The sports programs like football, soccer, cheerleading, softball, baseball, hockey....all cost money to participate, and then the shoes and other equipment is extra. Ever price a pair of ballet shoes for a 6 year old? $85 and they'll only fit for 5 months, at best.The school for ballet is in the neighbourhood of $125 per month, or 4 lessons. The recital? $500 for the costumes and you don't get free tickets, either. In fact, they want you to help then 'fund raise' by hitting up the rest of your family to come see strangers kids perform, usually badly. Like I said, things in affluent suburban towns may still have 'free' after school programs, but those aren't the people this thread was really about.

Sorry for derailing the train....back to your regularly scheduled topic.
__________________
How can we sleep while our beds are burning???
VeraBlue is offline  
Old 09-12-2008, 05:58 PM   #67
Sous Chef
 
GhettoRacingKid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 943
this is very very true. A good culinary education is tough on the wallet and very intimidating if you try to learn with out school or come from a well culianry knowledged family

I know my family are horrible cooks and barely knew enough to get by. but the family was broke as mcdonalds was actually a treat for us. we had simple easy meals. always had the protein, starch and veggie.

There are books and what not out there that are avaiable at a local library to learn how to cook healthy on a small budget.
__________________
Genius is sparked by other peoples ideas.
GhettoRacingKid is offline  
Old 09-12-2008, 05:59 PM   #68
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 3,619
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeraBlue View Post
The wording is a bit harsh, but I believe it's not too inaccurate a statement. People with lower incomes will have a harder time presenting a balanced, nutritious meal when vegetables, fish, chicken, beef, bread, eggs, milk, fruit, cheese have seen price increases of over 17% in the past year. If a family of 4 only has a $15 dollar dinner budget, it's a lot easire to hit the dollar menu at McDonalds than it is to prepare a meal hitting all the food groups.
$15 a dinner is $130 a week...and that's just dinner. They still need breakfast and lunch, personal items like tampons, toothpaste, household items like detergent and toilet paper... and before you know it, the food shopping bill can exceed $250 each week.
Unfortunately, I know that many people in the food service industry, working 8 hour days barely bring home more than $400 a week. That doesn't leave a lot for rent/mortgage, utilities, clothing, medical expenses.

A dinner deal is 2 pizzas and a 2-litre coke for $14.99. How can you pass that up? You can get 8 burgers, a couple of fries and some nuggets for $15. Apples cost $2.49 a pound, and you may get 4, but probably 3. A bag of Dorritos on sale is also $2.49, you get less....but most kids want that more.

It's unfortunate, but I believe that financial status plays an important role in weight.

You don't see too many overweight rich kids... They come home from school and participate in sports programs and other activities. All those activities cost money. Kids from struggling families don't have that kind of disposable income, and many schools eliminate or curb physical fitness due to budget cuts.
This is a clear picture of what I see here, too. High quality, healthy foods are definitely more expensive in San Antonio. Of course, there are inexpensive healthy foods like the beans and rice mentioned in many other posts and from what I see here, they are the staples of the poor families I know. Perhaps it's because for southerners and Mexicans, these are integral to our traditional meals. But they can still lead to obesity if not supplemented with fresh produce and other foods that are simply too expensive.

Your mention of sports and other activity is a very good one, Vera. Most of the kids I know from poor families come straight home from school and have no physical activity on a daily basis. First, because they can't afford or even get to sports programs. And second, because the areas they live in are unsafe and no place for children to play in. If you have a car and someone home to drive, you can go to nice city parks or play on a soccer team or a swim team, etc. That is just not an option for very poor children. Most of us take for granted that a nice long walk in the evening is safe but for poor people, safety is an issue 24/7. (I hope this doesn't sound "preachy". It was an eye-opener for me when I first truly became aware of how hard it is to be poor and the kinds of things they deal with every day.)
__________________
Fisher's Mom is offline  
Old 09-12-2008, 06:02 PM   #69
Sous Chef
 
GhettoRacingKid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 943
Vera,

I dont think you derailed anything. That is reality.

Ive been out of school for 10 years and your right about the budget. I know in my old school district it was always a fight to pass the budget.
__________________
Genius is sparked by other peoples ideas.
GhettoRacingKid is offline  
Old 09-12-2008, 06:06 PM   #70
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Philly PA
Posts: 702
I live in an area with many poor families. As mentioned by other posters I see many of them stocking up on frozen and boxed foods with thier food stamp cards

I myself have been living on a tight budget lately and find that fresh foods can be much more affordable but they require planning and paying attention to the unit cost etc

whole chickens and leg quarters are usually VERY affordable as are things like sacks of potatos and onions. Produce can be very expensive but not if you shop competitively and buy what is priced right.

Pasta, grains, beans are also cheap and generally a box of pasta and ingredients for a basic sauce are cheaper than poxed pasta-roni type products if you look at what you are actually buying.

The catch is preperation time and effective use of leftovers. Also the math is more complicated. A just add water box is pretty easy to price out and therfore seems cheaper than buying more items that you will use multiple times.

Time and energy to cook are also part of the equation. I remeber hearing one of the kids who lives down the block saying "mom was going to make pork chops but she feel asleep on the couch"

A whole chicken with potatos is one of the most cost effective and simple "real" dinners that you can make for a family. You can definitley get a really great meal on the table for around $10 meat veggies and all and have lunch for tomorrow for a family of four

Still 4 frozen dinners from the dollar store (or 99cent frozen pizzas) and a bag of chips is still cheaper and the chicken requires having some extra ingredients on hand like salt/pepper/oil at the very least.

Many prepard foods are no bargain at all though and actually blow budgets terribly.

At some level it is a personal choice on what is important to someone personally. nutritious menus can be done on the cheap but it takes some work a one box or nukeable dinner does not
__________________

__________________
PanchoHambre is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.