"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beverages and Wine > Alcoholic Drinks
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-27-2004, 10:31 AM   #1
Head Chef
 
ronjohn55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,080
Teach a friend to homebrew day

I was reminded last night that Saturday, November 6th is Teach-a-friend-to-homebrew day.

If anyone is curious to see how beer is made up close and personal, this is a great opportunity. If you check your local phone book for homebrewing supplies or beer making, you should be able to find a place that will have some sort of demonstration (and usually samples, too) on that day.

There's also a listing of registered sites at http://www.beertown.org/events/teach/sites.asp There are sure to be more, these are just sites that have been officially registered.

And yes, I'll be brewing that day, helping a fellow brewer make a cream ale, a style he's been having touble mastering.

Just thought I'd throw this up here for any interested parties.

John

__________________

__________________
ronjohn55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2004, 10:31 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
My husband wants to do this. He did 1 time and we threw it all away - it never got bubbly :-(
__________________

__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2004, 08:40 AM   #3
Head Chef
 
ronjohn55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,080
No bubbles is a pretty easy problem to fix!

There's a good homebrew store in NC (Homebrew Adventures), with a good website for tips, plus there are several excellent brewers in the state.

If you want more info, just give a yell!

John
__________________
ronjohn55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2004, 09:26 AM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
ROOOOOOOOOOOONJOOOOOOOOOOOOOOHNNNNNN

was that loud enough?

Maybe I can start him on his way via a Christmas present of some kind.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2004, 09:55 AM   #5
Head Chef
 
ronjohn55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,080
Plenty Loud!

Somehow I should have seen that one coming....

What type of informtation would you like?
Starter Kit info?
Extract? All Grain?

I got my starter kit from my loacl shop fo about $100. It came with two buckets (Fermenter and bottling buckets) the other hardware, a book, ingredients for my first batch, and 2 cases of longneck bottles. I've added to it considerably since then, but that's enough to get started.

Down in NC is a store call Homebrew Adventures (http://www.homebrewadventures.com) I'm sure they have a similar setup.

What types of beer is your husband looking to make?

John
__________________
ronjohn55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2004, 10:33 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,698
thanks for the info ronjohn, i am interested in making beer too. so far my christmas list is the new book and companion dvd from lidia's italian american kitchen, and a beer making starter set.

what beer would you recommend for a beginner. i like every beer known to man; some more than others of course, and some i'd marry, to steal a line from deadly sushi.

just had to tell you a quick beer story. my wife and i were taking a rainy day off from skiing at killington in vermont and after a day antique-ing in woodstock, we were heading home to our condo. as we drove thru the shifting foggy mountain roads, we came around a bend, and the sun suddenly started to shine, a great opening in the fog appeared before us. behold, the long trail brewery was just ahead beside the road. it was a beautiful site, and the "aroma"of the malt wafted thru my truck like incense.
we pulled in and upon entering the building, my wife was yapping away, so i stopped, and dropped to a knee and said "quiet, show some respect woman, this is holy ground". well, she just laughed :roll: and we went up to the tasting bar. we had some good soup and bread, cheddar cheese we picked up at another roadside place, and a few 5 way sampler beer trays. my favs are the long trail pollenator, and the double bag.
anyway, it was a great day. i went home with a coupla cases and t shirts, and a good story.
not to be outdone, a few weeks later, my wife and i were in a mall and we went into bloomingdales. she droppped to a knee, and said "shut up ya windbag, show some respect, this is a holy place"... lol.
__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2004, 10:52 AM   #7
Head Chef
 
ronjohn55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,080
Hi Buckytom!

If you're starting out, anything from a pale ale up through a proter or stout is probably best. Ironically, the beer that most brewers bash on the most, Bud, is literally one of the hardest to copy at home!

You defintely want to start with ales. Lagers require cooler fermentation temps, which means more expensive equipment, like a dedicated chest freezer or fridge. Ales can ferment at basically cool room temperatures. I ferment most of my beers in the basement, where it's usually about 68degrees F.

I love the story! We were out to Maui, I got word of a brewpub, and we were off across the island to go check it out, so I can relate!

John
__________________
ronjohn55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2004, 09:33 AM   #8
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Rochester Hills, MI
Posts: 104
Hey Ronjohn, I'm in SE michigan too...small world.

I homebrewed for a while but haven't been able to for about 3 years now due to various moves, child etc.

I agree with ronjohn's advice. I'm a big fan of the Papazian books to teach how it's done. Out here we've got a store "Brew & Grow" (the grow part is $500 grow lamps for growing er, um, tomatoes, yea that's it) and their kit seems really nice and they give very succinct instructions.

For a first beer that's drinkable, you've got do to a few things:

* Boil the wert. If the kit doesn't include boiling, run away.
* Steep some specialty malt - not a necessity but it will give your homebregi a bit more depth than syrup alone.
* Some kind of hop addition - usually just finishing hops to give it a little nose.
* Oxyginate - although oxygination during fermentation is bad, oxyginating the wert is important to get that yeast to get going. This can be as simple as pooring the wert at a height to get lots of bubbles to form. I had a difficult time getting this information (it's not clear in most of the books) but it helps. Another side effect of oxygination is that the yeast might take a few hours more to get going (it doesn't ferment while the yeast is absorbing oxygen, only once it's mostly gone) but when it gets going, watch out!

Some tips:

Yeast - if you feel up to it, get a liquid yeast even for your first batch - I've brewed all the way from pre-hopped malt extract to all grain and the biggest difference in flavor was between dry yeast and fresh yeast.

Sanitation - Aparently this is the most important aspect of brewing - keep everything clean. I'm usually a slob, but I've been compulsive regarding sanitation while brewing and I've never had a bad batch (kiss of death, I kow ).

good luck all.
__________________
beerco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2004, 02:25 PM   #9
Head Chef
 
ronjohn55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,080
Beerco, Is there a Brew and Grow up your way?

I'm only familiar with the one in Livonia - We swing by at lunch sometimes. Most of the time, I get my stuff from Adventures in Homebrewing down in Dearborn. Probably 99% of my brewing supplies to date have come from there. I'll prbably be back there this weekend to grab some more kegs. $13 each, all they need is a little TLC (or PBW in this case...) and some elbow grease.

John
__________________
ronjohn55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2004, 04:32 PM   #10
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Rochester Hills, MI
Posts: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronjohn55
Beerco, Is there a Brew and Grow up your way?
No, no brew & Grow up here, I used to live in Livonia when I started brewing. I haven't found (or looked very hard) anything up here.

I've always been impressed at the quality of the hops & yeast at B&G
__________________

__________________
beerco is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I was asked to cook on Sunday for a friend - need an idea kitchenelf General Cooking 16 01-12-2005 07:13 AM
Wish I had a foodie friend Claire Today's Menu 10 10-31-2004 12:35 PM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.