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Old 10-21-2007, 02:14 PM   #11
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Actually, all bourbons are sour mash whiskeys, the process where some of the backset (from the previous distillation) is added to the new mash. Jack Daniel's and Geroge Dickel are (sour mash) Tennessee Whiskeys due to the "Lynchburg Process" where the wiskey is charcoal filtered prior to barreling which technically prohibits them from being a bourbon.
So the spent mash is "sour mash"... I wasn't sure about that. I have to say I drink mainly single barrel bourbons. I am not fond of Jack Daniels.. Just doesn't taste right to me..
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Old 10-21-2007, 02:56 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Jeff G. View Post
So the spent mash is "sour mash"... I wasn't sure about that. I have to say I drink mainly single barrel bourbons. I am not fond of Jack Daniels.. Just doesn't taste right to me..
Yes, as much as 25% (usually less) of back set is added to the new mash. Every distiller has their own formular. It helps to create a continuity from mash to mash. Through reputation, and excellent Marketing strategies JD is probably the Number One selling American whiskey in the world! It's certainly not because of taste! (IMHO) The Black Label whiskey has quietly gone from 90 proof to 86 proof to it's current 80 proof, while retail prices have quietly gone up along with all whiskeys. It smells and taste of shellac to me. If I want a quality Tennessee Whiskey it is always George Dickle 12...which is always in my bunker along with numerous Bourbons.
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Old 10-21-2007, 04:23 PM   #13
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Yes, as much as 25% (usually less) of back set is added to the new mash. Every distiller has their own formular. It helps to create a continuity from mash to mash. Through reputation, and excellent Marketing strategies JD is probably the Number One selling American whiskey in the world! It's certainly not because of taste! (IMHO) The Black Label whiskey has quietly gone from 90 proof to 86 proof to it's current 80 proof, while retail prices have quietly gone up along with all whiskeys. It smells and taste of shellac to me. If I want a quality Tennessee Whiskey it is always George Dickle 12...which is always in my bunker along with numerous Bourbons.
GD is great, Makers Mark is usually on the shelf too. For basic mixing, Good ol' Jim Beam isn't bad. The black label (8yr old), is quite nice.

I didn't realize they back set quite that much!! that is substantial.. Currently I have a bottle of Elijah Craig 18 yr old. It has a unique flavor, quite unlike most bourbons.. I find it pleasant, some don't.
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Old 10-22-2007, 08:36 AM   #14
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I always thought I was a blanco tequila lover because I have been a Patron Silver fan forever and ever. But we went to this super new spot in Redmond tonight for cocktails called "Matador" and our great bartender recommended we try Don Camilo Reposado ... my oh my, it's a beyooootiful sipping tequila. Next time I'm trying an anejo! The gorgeous bar, with it's inlaid wood, was nearly as yummy as the drinks.

It's kind of like scotch ... hated it! Until a friend opened a bottle of 21-year-old GlenLivit. Talk about a quick convert. =P It's hard to describe the warmth that starts at the back of your throat and just kind of works it way down into your stomach until you're just kind of amazed at the taste that's left lingering on your tongue. Or a casket strength MacCallen which feels like sipping fire until you feel like glowing embers are rolling through your veins. oy I'm getting thirsty just typing this.

I'm not a huge gin drinker, but Bombay would have to be my choice if I were to make one.

I'm pretty ignorant about brandies. Other than having some in a coffee nudge once in awhile, I can't say I have ever had any.

And though I LOVE love the smell of whiskey and bourbons, I haven't quite developed a taste for them. Basil Hayden smells the best of what I know so far. Now if I could just learn to sip one ...


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