"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beverages and Wine > Alcoholic Drinks
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-13-2006, 11:41 AM   #31
Sous Chef
 
Jikoni's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Kenya and Switzerland
Posts: 861
I use local white wine from our village for cooking, but for some reason I prefer Gamay for my steaks or a bordeaux if we have guests.
__________________

__________________
There is no love sincerer than the love of food. ~George Bernard Shaw
Jikoni is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2006, 03:58 AM   #32
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Key West FL
Posts: 253
I use wine that I like to drink, for me it's sweet, not dry. And I open a fresh bottle every time. I don't like the taste when it's been open a couple days. Even though you put the cap back on, you can still tell.
__________________

__________________
biev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2006, 03:32 PM   #33
Senior Cook
 
fireweaver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: the d.c. 'burbs
Posts: 265
Send a message via Yahoo to fireweaver
hey RDG, i guess i should have been a bit clearer. i do find *colossal* differences in red as far as drinking, and i definately didn't mean to imply that "all reds taste the same"! perhaps it's just my cooking style, but i tend to prepare dishes with red wine that the wine flavor is only a bit-part in a larger whole (i.e., the particular type of wine not as crucial when you're marinating your steak in it and then flaming it on the grill, or if you're adding a half-glass to a hearty marinara). often, when doing dishes with white wine, i am deglazing the pan with it, resulting in the coating/sauce for the meal being made in no small part of the white wine. there are notable exceptions both ways (try deglazing a pan of sauteed veggies with an earthy tannic red and serve over pasta, or marinate veggies with a little white wine to toss on the grill), but for the most part, there you go.

no, i also would not be cooking with a 250-euro bottle! well, i'd sip whilst cooking, maybe, but it wouldn't end up in the food. definately a great moment to share with good friends.

for both cooking & drinking, those two coming out of the same bottle for me, i tend to keep it under $15/bottle.
__________________
I love cooking with wine...sometimes I even put it in the food... fireweaver.wordpress.com
fireweaver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2006, 05:50 AM   #34
Senior Cook
 
RDG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Milano, Italy
Posts: 223
Send a message via MSN to RDG
Quote:
Originally Posted by fireweaver
hey RDG, i guess i should have been a bit clearer. i do find *colossal* differences in red as far as drinking, and i definately didn't mean to imply that "all reds taste the same"! perhaps it's just my cooking style, but i tend to prepare dishes with red wine that the wine flavor is only a bit-part in a larger whole (i.e., the particular type of wine not as crucial when you're marinating your steak in it and then flaming it on the grill, or if you're adding a half-glass to a hearty marinara). often, when doing dishes with white wine, i am deglazing the pan with it, resulting in the coating/sauce for the meal being made in no small part of the white wine. there are notable exceptions both ways (try deglazing a pan of sauteed veggies with an earthy tannic red and serve over pasta, or marinate veggies with a little white wine to toss on the grill), but for the most part, there you go.

no, i also would not be cooking with a 250-euro bottle! well, i'd sip whilst cooking, maybe, but it wouldn't end up in the food. definately a great moment to share with good friends.

for both cooking & drinking, those two coming out of the same bottle for me, i tend to keep it under $15/bottle.
Thanks again, fireweaver, for your explanation.I had'nt understood well, effectively. In point of fact, we have nearly the same position in using wine, in the bottle price too, I see.. . Of course, there is some difference, but I think that this is the nice of cooking: the same recipe is never the same.....if made by two different persons!
__________________
RDG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2006, 09:33 AM   #35
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Dry Vermouth

If I'm planning to sip while I'm cooking, or am planning to serve wine with the meal, then I'll use whatever I'm sipping or going to serve in the meal. I will say, however, that I definitely do not like to use Chardonnay in cooking. I find that characteristic "oakiness" can come thru too strongly, especially as the wine cooks down.

For the most part, & as someone else here posted, I follow the advice of that Grand High Duchess of Cookery, Julia Child, & use dry vermouth in most recipes calling for dry white wine. According to Julia, even the cheapest dry vermouth is better for cooking than many expensive white wines, & it can be stored after opening without refrigeration. I always have a bottle in the pantry, along with dry sherry - which is another cooking staple for me.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2006, 10:32 AM   #36
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,370
Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
...I find that characteristic "oakiness" can come thru too strongly, especially as the wine cooks down...

California chardonnay producers decided oakiness was a good thing for chards. I prefer the more traditional non-oaky Australian chardonnays. Cooking with unoaked chards isn't bad.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2006, 11:18 AM   #37
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Thanks for the tip.

I don't mind the oakiness (so long as it's not overdone) if I'm drinking a Chardonnay; I just find it intensifies too much in cooking. I'll definitely have to try one of the Australians. Any particular ones you'd recommend?
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2006, 05:05 PM   #38
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,370
Depends on the price range. For low price and high taste, try Lindemann's Bin 65. Good for drinking and cooking.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:31 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.