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Old 07-15-2014, 03:50 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by chiklitmanfan View Post
Why throw perfectly good wine into the food when I can throw it directly into myself instead? But, seriously I cook very seldom with wine added into a recipe. I also enjoy wine BEFORE a meal rather than with a meal. With a meal I normally choose ice water. Veal, with a nice sauce fortified with wine is excellent; Ukrainian beet stew with red wine is good.
Again, there are flavors in some foods that dissolve only in alcohol, so cooking with wine not only adds the wine flavor but releases flavors from the food that you won't taste without it.

I like to keep the small bottles of wine in a four-pack on hand to use in cooking.
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Old 07-15-2014, 04:11 PM   #42
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I like to keep the small bottles of wine in a four-pack on hand to use in cooking.
That's a good tip. Most of the time I have something open in the fridge, but if I didn't I could sure see keeping some of those inexpensive airline size screwtop wines on hand to use for cooking.
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Old 07-15-2014, 04:56 PM   #43
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Red wine adds a depth of flavor and hardiness to make a tomato sauce taste much better. White wine adds great acidity and brightness to a dish, taking it over the top. Of course this is just my opinion.
I have an Italian friend who grew up in Italy that never puts red wine or any wine in his sauces.

I've watched famous chefs make tomato sauce but didn't use red wine.

I must be missing something from this depth of flavor you guys are mentioning. If you like that wine taste in your food, then your free to do that.
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Old 07-15-2014, 05:22 PM   #44
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I don't know what 'chopped meat' might be, but you could certainly use it in a beef casserole or a sauce for a sirloin, rump or fillet steak.

I prefer to use white wine or sherry with chicken dishes, although I have a chicken chasseur recipe that uses red wine.
I think the OP means what we called mince .
I often use a splash of wine in cottage pie.
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Old 07-15-2014, 05:41 PM   #45
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I have an Italian friend who grew up in Italy that never puts red wine or any wine in his sauces.

I've watched famous chefs make tomato sauce but didn't use red wine.

I must be missing something from this depth of flavor you guys are mentioning. If you like that wine taste in your food, then your free to do that.
I always used red wine in my bolognaise ragu until my Italian neighbour told me to use white as she said that Italians prefer it..

You shouldn't get a "wine taste" in the finished dish. If it tastes wine-y then it hasn't been cooked off properly.

Famous chefs can do as they please but famous doesn't always mean good. A friend of mine with more money than sense took me to a restaurant owned and supposedly run by a VERY famous chef (no names, no pack drill but you would instantly recognise the name). The food was awful. A chilled soup that I could swear came out of a tin; soggy, over-cooked veg and limp salad; a steak that was ordered as rare arrived on my plate black and tough and a "Speciality of the house" crème brulee that a school child in its first cookery class would be ashamed of. The restaurant wasn't busy - I wonder why? Oh, and the wine we ordered wasn't what the wine list or the label on the bottle said it was! And that contravenes the Trades Description Act and is fraud.

Having sent each course back my friend refused to pay the bill. When The manager threatened to call the police my friend quietly invited him to do so and pointed out the wine issue, adding, for good measure and truthfully, that he was a Queen's Counsel (the very top sort of lawyer in the UK). At which the manager turned pale and backed down.
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Old 07-15-2014, 07:03 PM   #46
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Hold on a minute. You put the wine IN the food?

Ooops. LOL!
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Old 07-15-2014, 07:11 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by manilak1d View Post
I have an Italian friend who grew up in Italy that never puts red wine or any wine in his sauces.

I've watched famous chefs make tomato sauce but didn't use red wine.

I must be missing something from this depth of flavor you guys are mentioning. If you like that wine taste in your food, then your free to do that.
As Mad Cook said, being a famous chef does not mean that your food tastes good. Also, living in Italy or being Italian does not automatically mean you cook well either. There are plenty of people in Italy who do not know the first thing about cooking.

As for what you are missing, it has been said over and over. There are flavor compounds that only exist in the presence of alcohol. It doesn't have to be about tasting wine in your food. That is why there are vodka pasta dishes. Vodka (if it is any good) is flavorless. So what is the point in adding a flavorless liquid to food? Same answer. The alcohol brings out an alcohol (only) soluble flavor in the tomatoes. You can ONLY taste that flavor once it is mixed with alcohol. The flavor simply does not exist otherwise.
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Old 07-15-2014, 08:06 PM   #48
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Hold on a minute. You put the wine IN the food?

Ooops. LOL!
A glug for the pot, a sip for the cook. Or is it the other way around?
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Old 07-15-2014, 08:08 PM   #49
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My daughter-in-law was born in Naples. Her mother is a fantastic cook. Along with her father. I would put them both up against Lydia any day. My DIL? After all these years she still can't boil water.
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Old 07-15-2014, 10:50 PM   #50
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As Mad Cook said, being a famous chef does not mean that your food tastes good. Also, living in Italy or being Italian does not automatically mean you cook well either. There are plenty of people in Italy who do not know the first thing about cooking.

As for what you are missing, it has been said over and over. There are flavor compounds that only exist in the presence of alcohol. It doesn't have to be about tasting wine in your food. That is why there are vodka pasta dishes. Vodka (if it is any good) is flavorless. So what is the point in adding a flavorless liquid to food? Same answer. The alcohol brings out an alcohol (only) soluble flavor in the tomatoes. You can ONLY taste that flavor once it is mixed with alcohol. The flavor simply does not exist otherwise.
Exactly.
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