"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Soups, Stews & Casseroles
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-25-2008, 09:07 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
TheCook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Longview, TX
Posts: 44
Chicken broth - my first try

I tried making chicken broth for the first time the other day. I used a recipe I found online. It's been in the fridge now for a day and I skimmed out all the fat on the surface. But the broth appears to be a little cloudy or have some kind of particles suspended in it. I did strain it all before I put it in the fridge.

My mom told me that she never lets hers get to a rolling boil because it produces "cloudiness" and that's undersireable.

Is there any problem with broth like this?

Thanks

__________________

__________________
-TheCook
TheCook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 09:12 AM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 23,299
There's no real problem with it - it will taste fine and there's nothing dangerous about it. If you used it for something like chicken soup, it will probably be a little cloudy, but that's an appearance thing. Some people are more concerned about that than others. I'm more concerned about the flavor, myself HTH.
__________________

__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 09:15 AM   #3
Assistant Cook
 
TheCook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Longview, TX
Posts: 44
Thanks GG! Man, you guys are quick here! I appreciate it. Love the name by the way -- GotGarlic!
__________________
-TheCook
TheCook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 09:21 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: central Ohio
Posts: 3,130
I second what GG says...flavor is what is important! Unless you were trying to make a consume' (I have no idea how to spell that!!)
__________________
"Many people have eaten my cooking & gone on to lead Normal lives."

deelady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 09:22 AM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Collier County, Fl.
Posts: 4,198
If you want a clearer stock, you could strain it thru several layers of cheesecloth, but it's not necessary. I never do and it's delich.

By the way, what an adorable baby face! It makes me smile! Thanks!
quicksilver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 09:24 AM   #6
Head Chef
 
David Cottrell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Norwalk, Ohio
Posts: 1,193
You did good, enjoy! You might experiment with what your mom told you and let us know!
David Cottrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 12:03 PM   #7
Head Chef
 
DramaQueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Posts: 1,347
I make gallons of the stuff cuz I use it for a lot of things. If you want clear broth, don't stir the broth as it's coming to a boil and don't stir during cooking. When you do that you bring up all the bits that sink to the bottom. Remove the chicken pieces with tongs when the broth cools so as not to disturb the broth. Let the pot sit on the stove for about 15 more minutes then pour through a couple of thicknesses of cheesecloth. Be sure not to pour too fast and don't pour what's left in the bottom of the pot. Clear broth and no debris.


If the pot is large and heavy, then ladle the broth through the cheesecloth. And who cares if it's cloudy anyway?
__________________
Visit my blogsite: Chew On This
DramaQueen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 03:57 PM   #8
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,803
I've been making my own stocks/broths for over 35 years now & have never given a rat's patootie about the clarity factor. In fact, I think all those teensy tinesy little bits add a heckuva lot of flavor.

Unless you're really into crystal-clear consomme, I'd pat myself on the back & enjoy what's undoubtably a delicious broth/stock in whatever recipes you choose to use it in. :)
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 04:01 PM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pdswife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Mazatlan
Posts: 20,334
Send a message via AIM to pdswife Send a message via MSN to pdswife Send a message via Yahoo to pdswife
Just enjoy it as it is. Ya done good!!!
__________________
Love the life you live!
pdswife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 04:20 PM   #10
Assistant Cook
 
TheCook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Longview, TX
Posts: 44
Made chicken noodle soup and grilled cheese sandwiches for lunch today. My hard to please wifey commented at how good it was so I guess I can call this a success.
__________________
-TheCook
TheCook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 04:22 PM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pdswife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Mazatlan
Posts: 20,334
Send a message via AIM to pdswife Send a message via MSN to pdswife Send a message via Yahoo to pdswife
Good to hear! Congrats.!!
__________________
Love the life you live!
pdswife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 06:28 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
Cloudy stock is caused by two different things.

1) Using RAW chicken scraps.
2) Keeping the stock at a full rolling boil for a lengthy time.

I always caramelize my chicken, by either sauteing or roasting. This helps make a "clear" stock, as well as makes it taste better. Once my stock begins to bubble, I slap a lid on it, and turn the heat down to low. If it's still bubbling to hard, I'll leave the lid askew, but I'll have to add more water as needed.

I just got done making a batch of chicken stock and a batch of beef stock this past week. My house smelled great for days!
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2008, 11:05 AM   #13
Assistant Cook
 
TheCook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Longview, TX
Posts: 44
Allen, I love the roasted chicken idea. Im definetly going to try that next time. Do you put any seasoning on the chicken at all?
__________________
-TheCook
TheCook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2008, 03:05 PM   #14
Master Chef
 
expatgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas girl living in Kazakhstan
Posts: 5,568
personally I don't mind cloudy chicken or beef broth.........I do love to bake my bones first, however, and it really does make a difference in the taste.......me.........I don't season my chicken or beefbones, however, but I'm sure that you could........someone will definitely chime in on this one........do line your pans with foil to ease clean-up however and they I spray a bit of olive oil on the foil before adding the bones.......just me........good luck...........
__________________
The only difference between a "cook" and a "Chef" is who cleans up the kitchen.
expatgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2008, 04:53 PM   #15
Sous Chef
 
ella/TO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 797
The old fashioned way from my "Bubby"......before adding any veggies to the stock, when the chicken and water comes to a boil, skim from the top of the stock until "the stuff" is almost all gone...as I'm doing it, I keep dipping my skimming spoon into a bowl of cold water and that removes any of "the stuff"....hope I've made myself somewhat clear....LOL Of course, after doing all that, add your veggies, which must include carrots, celery, parsnips, parsely root, onion and towards the end, some dill. Then strain thru' a fine strainer, or cheesecloth, keeping or discarding the veggies as you like
ella/TO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2008, 08:16 AM   #16
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
No, I don't season my bones/scraps before I roast. I have been known to add some whole garlic cloves, and sprigs of fresh thyme, sage, and rosemary to the stock. However, I don't always do that, as I'm not sure if the resulting will work for all dishes with those flavorings.
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2008, 08:20 AM   #17
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,803
I agree with Allen - unless I know exactly what I plan to use the resulting stock for, I steer clear of adding herbs outside of parsley. Thyme, sage, rosemary, etc., just don't "do it" if I might use the end product in, say, an Asian recipe.
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2008, 09:26 AM   #18
Assistant Cook
 
foodisfood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 48
Send a message via AIM to foodisfood Send a message via MSN to foodisfood Send a message via Skype™ to foodisfood
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCook View Post
Made chicken noodle soup and grilled cheese sandwiches for lunch today. My hard to please wifey commented at how good it was so I guess I can call this a success.
congrats!

oh and your avatar makes me smile... super cute!
__________________
food! yum!
foodisfood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2008, 10:49 AM   #19
Senior Cook
 
FincaPerlitas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: San Jose, Costa Rica, Central America
Posts: 285
I like my chicken stock to be fairly clear. I start with raw chicken, add cold water, bring to a boil then reduce heat slightly to maintain a slow boil. As the scum begins to rise to the surface, skim it with a spoon. Continue this until little or no new scum is forming. This usually takes me about 20 minutes. Then you can add vegetables, herbs, etc., and reduce the heat to simmer. I usually don't add salt to my stocks until I'm ready to use them in my recipe. After cooking, I allow my stock to cool slightly, then strain it with a fine mesh strainer or with a collander lined with cheesecloth.

If you want to actually clarify the stock (which I never bother with), separate an egg, then crush the eggshell with the egg white and 1/4 cup cold water (you don't use the yolk). Add it into the strained stock, bring to a boil, remove from heat and let stand for 5 minutes, then strain it again.
__________________

FincaPerlitas is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×