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Old 01-15-2014, 01:04 PM   #11
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I have found fresh California Bay leaves to be bitter sometimes. But I'd use for sure if I had my own tree!

I usually use dried Turkish ones.
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Old 01-15-2014, 01:57 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I have found fresh California Bay leaves to be bitter sometimes. But I'd use for sure if I had my own tree!

I usually use dried Turkish ones.
I have read that Turkish bay leaves are preferred over California one overall for better flavor.
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Old 01-15-2014, 02:24 PM   #13
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Julia Child usually specified "French bay leaves". She said they were much nicer.
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Old 01-15-2014, 03:47 PM   #14
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i think fresh leaves are way too strong. I prefer dried ones, simply because i used to them and also because where am i going to get fresh ones. Even when I do get my hands on a bunch of fresh ones, I leave them to dry, as there is really no good way to keep them fresh year around.
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Old 01-15-2014, 05:33 PM   #15
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I only use fresh because that's what's growing next to the rosemary bush at my back door. I do toss a few of the fresh into the back of my cupboards and they dry out but I only do that because my mother-in-law insisted it keeps the bugs away. So far, she's right.
I grew up in a house where you put a dried bay leaf or two into the flour storage container for the same reason, I still do it!
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Old 01-15-2014, 05:41 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post

My daughters ex boyfriend had a bay tree also. But he told me it was an evergreen?
We are in the south, but we do have winter.
Yes, it's an evergreen and yes, we do have winter. If there's another question here, I'm not getting it. Sorry, I've been sick for what feels like forever.
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Old 01-15-2014, 05:48 PM   #17
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It's never been about keeping bugs out of the flour. The bugs are already in the flour from the mill. Bug eggs get into the flour at the mill because they are too small for the filters.

Save the bay leaves for your recipes. If you want to kill the critters, put your bags of flour in the freezer for three days and they will be "permanently deactivated".
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Old 01-15-2014, 05:51 PM   #18
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It's never been about keeping bugs out of the flour. The bugs are already in the flour from the mill. Bug eggs get into the flour at the mill because they are too small for the filters.

Save the bay leaves for your recipes. If you want to kill the critters, put your bags of flour in the freezer for three days and they will be "permanently deactivated".
I didn't say it worked!
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Old 01-16-2014, 01:34 PM   #19
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Yes, it's an evergreen and yes, we do have winter. If there's another question here, I'm not getting it. Sorry, I've been sick for what feels like forever.
I was not certain regarding the words "winter over".

I thought you meant it dropped its leaves.
Do you still use the leaves that turn brown during winter? Do they turn brown?
Or do you remove those leaves in the spring and allow new ones to grow? You did say it was a tall tree.

Hope you get feeling better real soon!
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Old 01-16-2014, 02:00 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I was not certain regarding the words "winter over".

I thought you meant it dropped its leaves.
Do you still use the leaves that turn brown during winter? Do they turn brown?
Or do you remove those leaves in the spring and allow new ones to grow? You did say it was a tall tree.

Hope you get feeling better real soon!
It's an evergreen and its leaves stay green all winter. I cut stems when I want some, although right now, I have a large jar full of dried leaves. It had three trunks and was shading my other herbs too much, so last month, DH cut down two of the trunks. I will still have enough to last the rest of my life

As I said before, I haven't noticed any difference in the finished dish between using fresh or dried bay leaves, so I just use whatever's easiest. I don't know what type of bay it is; I bought it from an herb society sale probably 10 years ago.
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