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Old 07-18-2009, 11:57 AM   #11
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mystery herb

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maybe it is rosemary...???
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Old 07-18-2009, 12:06 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellakav View Post
looks like thyme
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Old 07-18-2009, 12:14 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellakav View Post
rosemary below looks more like xmas tree needles.

this is thyme below

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Old 07-18-2009, 12:14 PM   #14
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yep, it's thyme. yum yum! Great with chicken, pork. Use the leaves for the food, then throw the stems on the coals if grilling.
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Old 07-18-2009, 12:20 PM   #15
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yep, it's thyme. yum yum! Great with chicken, pork. Use the leaves for the food, then throw the stems on the coals if grilling.
can use stems soaked in liquid (stock and/or water) first to skewer chicken kabobs to grill
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Old 07-18-2009, 12:30 PM   #16
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well, I've got a crapload of the stuff, so how do I store it? it is pretty
dessicated already-I can just run my finger over it and separate the leaves
quite easily, but there is still a bit of moisture in them.

and thanx everyone - the last picture posted is identical.
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Old 07-18-2009, 12:37 PM   #17
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Thyme dries easily. I made some drying screens out of 1x2's and screen fabric (stapled on) They stack, with the bottom screen having feet so the air circulates. or you could put them on a cookie sheet on a very LOW oven setting, or use a dehyrator. I've also hung them to dry, but since the leaves are coming off easily, you may lose some.
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Old 07-18-2009, 12:41 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by ellakav View Post
well, I've got a crapload of the stuff, so how do I store it? it is pretty
dessicated already-I can just run my finger over it and separate the leaves
quite easily, but there is still a bit of moisture in them.

and thanx everyone - the last picture posted is identical.
just strip the stems. put the leaves after you strip them from stems on a cookie sheet and just let them dry a bit. and then store in tight lid jar
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Old 07-18-2009, 01:50 PM   #19
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Putting Up Basil

Fresh basil leaves - washed and dried
Olive oil
Salt
Jars with tight fitting lids

Place a layer of salt in bottom of bottle, then a nice amount of olive oil (about 1/4 inch). Start pressing basil leaves one at a time into olive oil. After you have added enough leaves that they are almost sticking out of oil start the layers over. Add a layer of salt then oil then leaves. Repeat layers to just below top of bottle and end with salt and oil. Cover tightly and refrigerate. As you use the basil leaves add more salt and oil so you keep basil covered. I use the oil also to add flavor to dishes. Basil is preserved in the salt and oil and lasts a long time. I have had it last 2 years in the fridge keeping it covered with salt and oil.
I don't mean to rain on this parade, but frankly, regardless of the safe 2-year lifespan you've had, I'd be much too afraid of botulism to try this method.
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Old 07-18-2009, 01:56 PM   #20
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i have never seen or tried purple basil. anyone? how does it compare to the green basil?
I've grown both the "Opal" & "Purple Ruffle" varieties, but don't bother with them anymore except as an occasional fragrant ornamental addition to a border or container.

The purple varieties are VERY strongly clove scented, & since I'm not a big clove fan, I don't find them interesting or desirable to cook with. The green varieties are more complex in scent/taste, & I grow a variety of those - "Sweet Italian", "Genovese", "Lemon", "Lime", etc., etc. I love trying different GREEN varieties - lol!

But of course, this - like all things "food", boils down to personal taste. Others may love the scent/taste of purple basil. It just doesn't float my boat except for ornamental use. If you want to try it, many seed companies carry it, & it's just as easy to grow as the green types.
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