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Old 04-09-2008, 08:57 AM   #11
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We have a limited garden space. But have had much larger gardens.

I don't know what went wrong with your herbs. Gosh, those things are like weeds. They are generally hardy and need little attention. Even during the winter we toss some seeds in pots in the house and they grow like crazy.

Agree with the precious posters, you do need drainage if you are growing in pots.

As far as tomatoes go, always start with plants. Have raised them from seeds but have very little time to do so. The ones in pots will bring more fruit if you don't start them early in the house and then make them hardy.

Peas and beans, from seeds.

You can find most plants at your local supermarket, Walmart, you name it.

The bottom line is have fun. Every year some things work for us and others do not.

And some things never do well here.

And so we plant what grows and eschew those things that do not.

Oh, yes, and fertilize.

And have fun.
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Old 04-09-2008, 09:05 AM   #12
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I'm having tons of fun starting my seeds.... but I have the time for it, and I've been doing it a few years now.
Definately buy plants first. Learn what they like and what you need to do with them.
If you go into it not knowing much and starting seeds it can get very frustrating.
Also keep a journal of your garden, the plants happenings. Keep it and look at it each year. You can learn alot from yourself!!
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Old 04-09-2008, 10:31 AM   #13
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The problem is probably your potting soil. When it comes to buying potting soil, you get what you pay for.
Miracle Gro makes a good one that drains well, yet retains needed moisture and has a 90 slow release fertilizer. Peter's also makes a good one.
You can also mix your own, with 50% peat moss, 25% vermiculite, and 25% perlite (or plain cat litter), and top dress your potted plants with Osmocote, which is the slow release fertilizer.
Certain herbs require a limey soil, so add in a handful or so of garden lime to the mix for: lavender, sage, and thyme.

After that, feed your plants half-strength liquid feed every 10-14 days.
Regardless of whether you mix your own potting soil or buy it, wet it BEFORE using, and mix it well.
If you follow these instructions, I promise you'll have better luck.

PS...I don't mean to sound like a know-it-all, but I owned a retail greenhouse business for 22 years, and grew most of what I sold.
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Old 04-09-2008, 04:05 PM   #14
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thanks guys!!

all this information is extremely helpful and i can't wait to try again!
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Old 04-09-2008, 05:06 PM   #15
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Im at it for the first time too.... actually my brothers GF sort of hijacked the seed starting but that's ok I need to not be such a control freak about the house anyway. We have tons of herbs started and a some veggies and fruits. All the edibles will be in conatiners (safely above dog leg height)as the backyard is a small concrete patio it is super sunny back there though. The front yard will be all ornamental as the doggie hangs out there and

I am hoping for the best with all the seeds...if they dont work out its off to the nursery. I bought tons of pots they are going to be filled one way or the other.

Hopefully this weekend will be time for outdoor planting.... still scared of the cold though.
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Old 04-09-2008, 05:21 PM   #16
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A nice way to grow spices on the deck or patio is get one of those strawberry pots. I did this one year growing different spices out of each hole and chives on top. The thing I hate about the pots is thy dry up easily, so really have to pay close attention to watering. Now I just have a herb garden which makes things a lot easier.

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Old 04-09-2008, 05:39 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larry_stewart View Post
A nice way to grow spices on the deck or patio is get one of those strawberry pots. I did this one year growing different spices out of each hole and chives on top. The thing I hate about the pots is thy dry up easily, so really have to pay close attention to watering. Now I just have a herb garden which makes things a lot easier.

larry
Larry, I used to have a problem keeping my strawberry pots moist, but I solved that problem. I took a 3-inch (diameter) piece of PVC pipe the height of the pot. Drilled a series of evenly-spaced 1/4-inch holes along the length of the pipe. Placed the pipe in the center of the pot before adding soil. When I wanted to water, all I did was to "fill" the pipe in the center. This made it very easy to water the strawberry pot thoroughly and not force soil and plants out of the little holes/balconies in it. You might want to give this a whirl.
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Old 04-09-2008, 06:10 PM   #18
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What a good idea!

If you plant your squash, melons and cucumbers in hills, you can do the same thing...put the pipe in the center of the hills, and the water will go right to the roots. I used to buy the tall cans of fruit juice for my kids, and I'd save the empty cans and punch holes in the bottom and sides for that purpose.
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