"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Menu Planning > Budget Friendly Dishes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-12-2009, 06:36 PM   #81
Senior Cook
 
TheMetalChef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chile Chef View Post
shepherds pie
If I could have convinced my mother/grandmother to make shepherd's pie every night, I would have been a happy little camper.

Alas, our menu usually featured a heavy rotation of frozen chicken pot pies (not that I mind those), Salisbury steak, usually accompanied by canned spinach (ick ick ick), sauerkraut with knockwurst (took me YEARS to be able to eat either of those foods, as terribly prepared as they were in my house) and then the Sunday "boil every bit of flavor out of whatever piece of meat is on sale and serve it with mashed potatoes and gravy made from the water it was boiled in" special.

I alternate between wondering how in the hell I turned into a foodie and being amazed that I didn't turn into one a lot sooner than I did...
__________________

__________________
We've moved the show to DailyMotion.com!

(Youtube didn't like us publishing full feature length shows....)
TheMetalChef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 06:52 PM   #82
Sous Chef
 
chefkathleen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Florida!
Posts: 697
Quote:
I alternate between wondering how in the hell I turned into a foodie and being amazed that I didn't turn into one a lot sooner than I did...
Desperation? Necessity?
__________________

__________________
chefkathleen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 10:29 PM   #83
Cook
 
BH51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: West Tennessee
Posts: 54
My mother was spin-off of her mother, my grandmother
& the wife of a share-cropper....and they were poor, but
didn't know it...you would be amazed the things you can
do with basic stuff like flour, potatoes, eggs & shortening.
They lived off the land, grew there own vegetables and
raised there own meat...I grew up royalty in comparison..
Still practice my grandmother's cooking concept today...
They raised 6 daughters and a son & wasted nothing.....
They didn't use money for food, they had to have money
for other things....now that's budgeting............BH51....
__________________
"Hey, ya gotta eat!"
BH51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2009, 07:54 AM   #84
Head Chef
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Spain
Posts: 1,167
Thanks for the explanation of SOS. I even thought it might be a jokey spelling for sauce! Pb&js - is that peanut butter and jelly sandwiches?

Cheap food when I was a kid (1960s) - I remember spam, tinned beetroot and mashed potato, my mum used to pour the juice from the beetroot onto the potato as gravy! Sardines or poached egg on toast, neither of which I liked. Baked beans on toast (tinned beans in sauce, not homemade). Sunday lunches were a torment - they'd obviously taken ages to prepare and had cost more, but I hated having to swallow mouthfuls of chewy gristle. I remember lots of minced beef. Cottage pie is still a favourite, though none of the other dishes are.

When I was 14, I did an exchange with a French girl - she came to stay with us for a month, I went to stay with her for a month. She must have been very tolerant on the food front! I remember as I walked into her home the very first time, her mum was taking a tray of stuffed tomatoes out of the oven. I was stunned - they looked like a painting to me. I had my first spaghetti that year too.

When I was 16, the whole of my family went to visit hers. French food was a revelation to my mum too. Having grown up in the war and during rationing in Britain, she'd never really learnt to cook anything but the basics. The food we ate from then on was very different - she bought cookery books, watched the cooking shows on telly, etc. - and she is now a fine cook.
__________________
Snoop Puss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2009, 09:37 AM   #85
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 623
we moved from a very large city where my Dad had worked for an aerospace company to a very rural and tourist-driven area when I was 9 years old. it was a massive culture and financial shock, let me tell you. and my parents were already screwed up-my mother walked out on us not too long after that. my little sister and I knew how hard it was for our Dad to support us, work was VERY hard to come by for someone with his skills and education. for a long time we were latchkey kids and we would make
do with a lot of pb&j and kraft mac and cheese after school. but when he
came home he was always able to cobble something together for us so
that we would have a family meal each nite. looking back I don't know how
he did it. we had a lot of ham and beans in the crockpot. SOS, hamburger gravy and rice, sausage and baked beans, goulash, cabbage, potato and keilbasa, cabbage and potato soup, oatmeal. somehow we never did without. when I was 12 my Dad got a job at a new hospital that opened in the area and he put me in the kitchen with him and began teaching me how to cook. he was fantastic at it, very creative. I took to it easily and still use a lot of the recipes he taught me. my Dad was the 'troubled genius' type. he suffered bouts of depression and was a high-functioning alcoholic.
but he was so gifted in so many things and no matter how badly he was
feeling, he always provided for his girls, always worked his tail off. the times that I had with him in the kitchen learning how to measure and sift
and chop and create are some of the sweetest memories I have of us together and to this day when I make a meatloaf, or spaghetti or chili or
any of the myriad Hungarian dishes he taught me I am briefly 12 years old again. I miss him desperately sometimes.
but those days of beans and cabbage were a HUGE source of uncivilized humor between the three of us!!
__________________
ellakav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2009, 11:55 AM   #86
Sous Chef
 
chefkathleen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Florida!
Posts: 697
That's a great story Ella. I loved it. I know what you mean about missing a parent. I'm that way about my mom, although all I have to do now a days is look in the mirror and she's there looking back at me.
I'm a kid again when I make her potato soup.
__________________
chefkathleen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2009, 12:40 PM   #87
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: California
Posts: 111
Absolutely, macaronni cheese!! and I really love it ^^
__________________
Thaicooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2009, 01:59 PM   #88
Sous Chef
 
Chile Chef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Winter Park Fl, Or Bust!
Posts: 853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thaicooking View Post
Absolutely, macaronni cheese!! and I really love it ^^
Now you sound like me :)

I have 8 boxes of the cheap mac & cheese stocked in my pantry, which I only use once in a great while if I'm in a lazy mood that day and don't want to cook anything!
__________________
Chile Chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2009, 10:39 AM   #89
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 623
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefkathleen View Post
That's a great story Ella. I loved it. I know what you mean about missing a parent. I'm that way about my mom, although all I have to do now a days is look in the mirror and she's there looking back at me.
I'm a kid again when I make her potato soup.

thanks. those are treasured memories during what was at times a
very difficult time in our lives. Dad and I knocked heads. A LOT.
we adored one another, but we were at odds SO much of the time!
I realized after we lost him that the reason why was because we
were so alike, he and I. out of his 3 children, I inherited the most
from him in the way of personality traits and temperament. the
younger ones got all that high intelligence.but I got the artistic
side of him! also a few other things, but I beat those long ago...

one of the other things he taught me to make when I was a kid
was spaghetti sauce in a large amount. then we'd freeze individual
portions for the future for those times when we were tight on money
or just wanted something quick and easy for dinner. he made a killer
sauce and I use that 'recipe' to this day. I typed it that way because
I wouldn't be able to write an actual recipe! my Dad was one of those
cooks that measured nothing. he did everything by sight or taste and
that's pretty much how I do it, too!
__________________
ellakav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2010, 04:20 PM   #90
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 18
During the week, we would have fried salt pork, left over potatoes chopped up with onions and fried in a cast oven frying pan, along with this we had creamed style corn. Some call it slum gullion , we called it American chop suey, also poor mans soup was a big hit made with salt pork onions and diced potatoes and if we had flour mom made biscuits.But, on Friday night when Dad got paid he would bring home a steak and we would have french fries.
__________________

__________________
Pookahberry is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.