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Old 09-12-2006, 03:34 PM   #21
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Thanks FryBoy..how many hours if you don't have a meat therm.? The bird is about 4 1/2 lbs.
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Old 09-12-2006, 03:36 PM   #22
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now blondie... the LEAST you can do after all this is come back and let us all know how it finally came out... the most important thing when cooking is to ENJOY IT!! have fun with the process and also, use all your senses - see the browning of the bird occurring, hear the juices sizzling on the bottom of the pan, smell the aromas at their different stages of cooking, and feel how the drumstick wiggles at the joints telling you whether it is near to being done...
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Old 09-12-2006, 03:38 PM   #23
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I will come back and let you all know how it comes out. I just hope it will be delicious!!!

Thanks for all the help!!!!
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Old 09-12-2006, 03:43 PM   #24
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IMO brining doesn't have a discernable affect on the texture of poultry or pork unless you overbrine it. Then it's mushy. Try brining one next time and see for yourself.

America's Test Kitchen advocates the flipping and turning of the chicken but I have found that messy and bothersome. IMO it is important to pull the bird out and turn it around halfway through, as ovens are hotter in the back, sometimes by a lot.

I also love the high heat roasting method of Peterson and Barbara Kafka. The recipe I posted up above is for a higher heat roasted bird. I slice potatoes and spread them across the bottom of the roasting pan to keep the smoke down.

The chicken will take about 1 1/2 - 1 3/4 hours @ 350, but you should use a meat thermometer if you have one because you can't go on time alone. The starting temp of the turkey, how accurate your oven is, etc. affect how long it takes to cook. Another good thing about brining is that the meat will still be juicy even if overcooked a bit.
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Old 09-12-2006, 03:43 PM   #25
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That's one big mama chicken! 18 to 20 minutes a pound at 375 degrees, if I remember correctly.

As noted above, it's done when the juices run clear -- poke it with a cooking fork in the thigh joint -- if the juices are red, it's not done.

An instant-read thermometer is one of the best investments you can make for your kitchen or BBQ grill. They're not terribly expensive, around $10 for a good Taylor brand thermometer at any cooking store or even in most supermarkets.
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Old 09-12-2006, 03:44 PM   #26
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here is a cooking time chart for chicken:

http://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-ti...en-Cooking.asp
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Old 09-12-2006, 06:43 PM   #27
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Okay ladies and gents...the chicken is in the oven. Here's to good eating!
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Old 09-13-2006, 06:33 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FryBoy
... he just puts a whole chicken in a 450 degree Faranheit oven (230 C) for 50 minutes, until the skin is crispy and brown and the juices that accumulate in the cavity (inside the bird) are no longer pink, then serves it... http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/brining.html
Couldn't agree more. If ever there were an easy dinner, a whole chicken shoved in the oven is it!

My best way to cook the entire Sunday dinner at once (to free me up to iron, oh joy) is to peel and cut potatoes and plunk them in the bottom of a large roasting pan, sautee some okra 'til browned and plunk them in a corner of the same pan, then shove a whole chicken (thawed fully or mostly, rinsed and innards emptied out) on top. Pour a generous amount of olive oil over the veggies and then the juice of a couple of fresh lemons. Salt, pepper and whatever other spices turn you on (rosemary's nice).

-- Shove it in a hot oven. How hot? Somewhere around 200 (C, not F!).

-- Whatever side you started with, once the upper side browns a bit, flip it over to brown the underside. Do this a couple of times ... or once. Turn the veggies at the same time.

-- Baste a couple of times ... or not. Add some water if the juices dry out (they may be key to keeping the chicken moist -- dunno, never done it without!).

Cook until juices run clear, yes, and/or until you can wiggle the drumstick and it's really loose (or even comes off in your hand if you absolutely don't want underdone chicken). The potatoes should be done perfectly at about the same time (the veggies will be gloriously overcooked ... the one time I really love them that way!).

I'm another one who's done this for years and years without the benefit of brining or a meat thermometer or anything else fancy, and I swear my chicken is always tender and juicy with yummy crispy skin outside.

There ARE recipes which require paying a lot of attention to technique, quantities, timing, etc. -- but this isn't one of them!!

Good luck. Really, it's hard to go very wrong.
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Old 09-13-2006, 10:41 AM   #29
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Cooking the chicken

Hi all,

Well I took most of your advice and cooked the chicken in the roaster with vegies. I don't really know what happened but the chicken was undercooked. I am thinking I didn't have the correct lbs of the bird. I even cooked it at 450 since it wasn't cooking as fast as I needed for honey to come home to dinner. I guess I underestimated the time it needed to cook fully. So dinner wasn't as great as it was supposed to be. I guess better luck next time. Did make for great left over meal for my breakfast this morning.

Thanks again for all the help!

Blondie
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Old 09-13-2006, 10:47 AM   #30
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Better much next time. Cooking is all about experience, and there's no one here who can honestly say they never made a mistake. Like my medium rare pot roast back in 1968....

Anyway, undercooked is always better than overcooked -- you can put it back in the oven for a few minutes, or if you're in a hurry, just stick the underdone parts in the microwave for a minute.
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