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Old 11-08-2012, 03:05 PM   #1
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Question Help with cooking a whole chicken please.

Hi everyone, my name is Cella & I'm brand spankin' new to this site so please bare with me.

I came across discusscooking.com after I Googled "How long do you cook a whole chicken"? I've read all of the comments and sadly I'm still unsure. I am a beginner in the kitchen (hence the "bare with me" statement) so forgive me if the answer should have been obvious.

I have a 8.30 lb Purdue whole fryer and I don't know how long I should cook it, nor do I know what temperature to cook it at?

Like everyone else, all I want is for the thing to be juicy! So cooking it "low & slow" is preferred, right? Also, do I baste it or do anything else? Heck, I don't even know if I cover the thing with foil or not!

If anyone could tell me the play by play instructions for this, I'd greatly appreciate it! Thanks in advance ~ Cella

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Old 11-08-2012, 03:29 PM   #2
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Welcome to DC!

425 F for 1.5-2 hours should do it. For an 8.3 lb bird, you're probably looking at closer to 2 hours.

But if you have the time, it's usually better to roast at a lower temperature, since the chicken stays moist and cooks more evenly. At 325 F, a bird that size will probably take 3.5 hours.

The chicken is done when a temperature probe inserted into the thickest part of the thigh reads 165 F.
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Old 11-08-2012, 03:37 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cella View Post
Hi everyone, my name is Cella & I'm brand spankin' new to this site so please bare with me.

I came across discusscooking.com after I Googled "How long do you cook a whole chicken"? I've read all of the comments and sadly I'm still unsure. I am a beginner in the kitchen (hence the "bare with me" statement) so forgive me if the answer should have been obvious.

I have a 8.30 lb Purdue whole fryer and I don't know how long I should cook it, nor do I know what temperature to cook it at?

Like everyone else, all I want is for the thing to be juicy! So cooking it "low & slow" is preferred, right? Also, do I baste it or do anything else? Heck, I don't even know if I cover the thing with foil or not!

If anyone could tell me the play by play instructions for this, I'd greatly appreciate it! Thanks in advance ~ Cella
I would cook it at 325 til the juices run clear. Take a stick and a half of butter soften it then add some chopped fresh parsley,tiny fresh rosemary chopped fine say about 1 Tab. some chopped shallot make sure it's chopped super fine and one clove of garlic crushed.Mix the butter and herbs together Now carefully lift the skin and smear some of the mixed softened butter over the meat under the skin. if there is leftover butter rub the whole outside of the chicken with it. Truss or tie the legs together so they cook evenly. put some butter, and lemons on the inside of the bird in the cavity cut the lemon into wedges. add salt and pepper sit the chicken on a rack or on any veggies that you love cook til done and the chicken is NOT pink. Anyone else out there who can help this bird is bigger than I'm use to.
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Old 11-08-2012, 04:05 PM   #4
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You cook it until it's done and the only way to tell that is by using a meat thermometer! Whole chickens need to reach an internal temp of 165F. How long it takes to get there depends on the heat at which you cook it & the size of the bird. =)

There are as many ways to roast a chicken as there are to make spaghetti sauce. But after trying a hundred different ways I have found I like mine plain and simple best:

Preheat an oven to 450F.

Rub a very light coat of olive oil on the chicken's skin. Use about 1 T total kosher salt (about 1/3 goes into the bird and 2/3 showered over the outside) & a couple healthy grinds of pepper.

Roast until done. I generally check the temperature at the 50 minute mark for a 3-4 lb bird and it's usually done or very close to done then. It will take longer for an 8+lb chicken.

Once it's done in the oven, tent it under some foil and let it rest for about 10-15 min before you carve it up (that gives the juices time to redistribute in the meat and ensures it will be nice and juicy!)
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Old 11-08-2012, 04:10 PM   #5
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I like a crispy skin on turkey and chicken. Pat the bird dry, season with S&P. Cook on a rack in a roasting pan with 2 cups of water or chicken stock. I add onion,carrots&celery to the bottom of the pan and cook at high temp, 450 degrees,(not low & slow) until internal temp reaches 170 degrees. An 8 lb bird should not take longer then an hour. After 30 mins,turn (rotate)the chicken 180 degrees and add more water or stock if needed. If you stuff the bird, the stuffing temp should be at least 165 degrees.
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Old 11-08-2012, 08:15 PM   #6
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Most of the advice above is right on.

We use two alternate methods depending on our mood. One is to cook the bird upright on a chicken roaster or "beer roaster" Some versions allow you to add your choice of flavor enhancer such as a good beer or herb enhanced broth. And they roaster collects that juices for some terrific gravy or just drippings. Having the roster core inserted into the middle of the bird adds heat to the core which cooks a bit quicker and we think a bit more evenly.

The second is to use a clay baker which recirculates the juices and nutrients back into the chicken adding flavor. This method allows you to experiment with different herbs and spices to enhance taste. We add vegetables into the clay baker as well for a one dish meal. Take the top off for the last 15 minutes or so to get a brown and crispy exterior if you prefer. For an 8+ pound chicken you do need a good sized baker but the results are usually worth it.
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Old 11-08-2012, 10:22 PM   #7
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I was just about to post that if you aren't looking for a presentation bird, a braised bird in beer is the most succulent I've ever made (thanks, Yogiwan).

I crammed a whole chicken into a covered pot with a beer and lots of herbs, baked it until falling apart, and it was the best I've ever made. The chicken and subsequent broth disappeared almost immediately. YUM!!!
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Old 11-09-2012, 03:10 PM   #8
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A camp dutch oven is another alternative. A camp dutch oven has three legs and is designed to be used over coals. The lid has a rim to hold coals on top. I have cooked many a chicken in my DO and have never had any problems. Start your coals. You will likely need 12-14 briquets underneath and 10-12 on top. Start more coals in a chimney starter. After the coals are used up (they will get very small), place an equal amount of fresh coals over and under again. The good thing about a camp dutch oven is that the lid is heavy. It holds the heat in and works in a similar fashion to a pressure cooker set at low. A bird that size ought to be done in 1-2 hours using this method. If you desire more browning, add 10 or so more coals near the end of the cooking.
I reckon most folks don't have a camp dutch oven but I wouldn't trade mine for gold. JMHO, mind you.
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Old 11-09-2012, 03:20 PM   #9
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Spatchcock, brine, pat very dry, coat with olive oil, S&P and grill over hardwood charcoal!
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Old 11-09-2012, 05:44 PM   #10
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Spatchcock, brine, pat very dry, coat with olive oil, S&P and grill over hardwood charcoal!
That's what's going on here in our house tonight!
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