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Old 11-02-2017, 06:31 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
I've been cooking for over 50 years, so it is a great standard.
Dying isn't always the result of food poisoning. More often, people just get sick, sometimes several days after they ate the food, so they don't connect the two. So, no, it's not a great standard.
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Old 11-02-2017, 10:40 AM   #12
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You take yourself WAY too seriously. I bet you throw out all the food in your refrigerator, freezer and cupboard on it's expiration date, too, dont you?
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Old 11-02-2017, 02:49 PM   #13
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You take yourself WAY too seriously. I bet you throw out all the food in your refrigerator, freezer and cupboard on it's expiration date, too, dont you?
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Old 11-02-2017, 02:55 PM   #14
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Thanks go to everybody that voiced their opinion.

I decided to keep and use the broth. This is the link that convinced me that the
broth I made should be safe to eat. After all broth simmered long before the 4 hour mark for high setting. I did not mention I started on high and once simmer was achieved I switched to low.

]http://www.crock-pot.com/service-and-support/product-support/product-faqs/food-safety/food-safety-faq.html[/URL]http://www.crock-pot.com/service-and-support/product-support/product-faqs/food-safety/food-safety-faq.html

With that said next time I make broth in the crock pot I will just roast the bones prior to placing in the crock.

I did save the fat too, it is in the freezer too. Can it be used?
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Old 11-02-2017, 07:22 PM   #15
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Thanks go to everybody that voiced their opinion.

I decided to keep and use the broth. This is the link that convinced me that the
broth I made should be safe to eat. After all broth simmered long before the 4 hour mark for high setting. I did not mention I started on high and once simmer was achieved I switched to low.

]http://www.crock-pot.com/service-and-support/product-support/product-faqs/food-safety/food-safety-faq.html[/URL]http://www.crock-pot.com/service-and-support/product-support/product-faqs/food-safety/food-safety-faq.html

With that said next time I make broth in the crock pot I will just roast the bones prior to placing in the crock.

I did save the fat too, it is in the freezer too. Can it be used?
Starting with roasted bones does add nice flavor. It is kinda' like browning meat before braising -- the brown bits are full of flavor.

As for saving the fat, I have never done that with chicken fat, so I don't honestly know what can be done with it. I do it with pork fats. Of course, bacon fat is pure artery-clogging gold. Bacon fat can make kale taste good, and make it unhealthy at the same time.

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Old 11-02-2017, 08:22 PM   #16
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I did save the fat too, it is in the freezer too. Can it be used?
Rendered chicken fat is known in Jewish cooking as schmaltz. Off the top of my head, it can be used to roast potatoes or as the fat in a savory pie crust.
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Old 11-02-2017, 11:18 PM   #17
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Rendered chicken fat is known in Jewish cooking as schmaltz. Off the top of my head, it can be used to roast potatoes or as the fat in a savory pie crust.
That reminds me... I like to put cut up and par-cooked red potatoes in a drip pan under my rotisserie chicken. Yeah, chicken fat and roasted potatoes are good together.

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Old 11-03-2017, 09:53 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by caseydog View Post
Starting with roasted bones does add nice flavor. It is kinda' like browning meat before braising -- the brown bits are full of flavor.

As for saving the fat, I have never done that with chicken fat, so I don't honestly know what can be done with it. I do it with pork fats. Of course, bacon fat is pure artery-clogging gold. Bacon fat can make kale taste good, and make it unhealthy at the same time.

CD
Thank you for that last comment... it gave me a good chuckle this morning.
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Old 11-04-2017, 09:38 PM   #19
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Not sure how I managed to put my comment here. It was meant to be for breakfast thread. Sorry.
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Old 11-06-2017, 12:49 PM   #20
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I wouldn't be concerned that any microorganisms might have survived the 9 hour simmer. I would be wondering if the microorganisms that grew during the 3 hours before the simmer had left behind any toxins.
This. The bacteria that was rapidly multiplying while in the danger zone might have thrown off spores.

You need to start stock or broth on high and switch to low
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broth, chicken, chicken broth, cook, recipe, slow cooker

Is it safe, slow cooker chicken broth? Hi everyone, I made chicken broth in my slow cooker . I put the rinsed raw chicken backs, onion, chopped carrots, celery, whole black pepper, water. The concern I have is that it took close to 3 hours for the water/broth to come to a simmer. Is it safe to eat or is it bacteria infested? I cooked for 9 hours. Quickly cooled and refrigerated. Next day pulled the fat from the top, put in freezer. Any feed back is appreciated. 3 stars 1 reviews
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