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Old 05-10-2012, 04:26 AM   #11
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Harry,

It is very uncommon today to find modern professional women, who do not wax unwanted hair ! and futhermore, I cannot believe that German women do not wax !

Madré Mía, what sub topics land up on D.C.

Margi.



Margi.
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Old 05-10-2012, 04:29 AM   #12
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Buckytom, Good Morning,

Cornish hens and Guinea Fowl are truly distinctly different in texture and flavor.

Quail too.

From my view point, perhaps, more close in texture or flavor profile would be:

Partridge, Red Partridge or Pheasant ...

Have a nice day.

Margi.
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Old 05-10-2012, 10:32 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
From my view point, perhaps, more close in texture or flavor profile would be:

Partridge, Red Partridge or Pheasant ...
I agree, Margi. However, due to the lack of partridges and pheasants, I think I'll replicate the recipe with some humble cockerel I've got in my larder...
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Old 05-10-2012, 12:16 PM   #14
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Luca,

I am a fan of Guinea Fowl ...

Actually it is more costly than Partridge in Spain ! It is wonderful ...

Here are seasons for feathered game birds, due to the extensive dryness we have here ... and lack of rain ...

Margi.
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Old 05-10-2012, 04:20 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Buckytom, Good Morning,

Cornish hens and Guinea Fowl are truly distinctly different in texture and flavor.

Quail too.

From my view point, perhaps, more close in texture or flavor profile would be:

Partridge, Red Partridge or Pheasant ...

Have a nice day.

Margi.
yes, i was replying as to what would be a commonly available substitute for game birds here in the u.s..
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Old 05-11-2012, 02:15 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Harry,

It is very uncommon today to find modern professional women, who do not wax unwanted hair ! and futhermore, I cannot believe that German women do not wax !

Madré Mía, what sub topics land up on D.C.

Margi.



Margi.
you should visit Wales
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Old 05-11-2012, 02:45 AM   #17
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This is one of my own.
The day before the dinner party.
Remove the breasts from your pheasant, place the breasts in a dish and put a few glugs of port in, cover and put in the fridge.
Make crepes and cover.
Fry some diced bacon, remove from the pan, chop the rest of the pheasant and fry, remove from pan.Fry carrots, onions and garlic then put the bacon and pheasant back in the pan and cover with red wine, bring to a boil and simmer till the meat is very tender, remove the carcass and strip the meat off and reserve.
Pass the stock the reduce to make a good gravy.

Shred onion and fennel on a mandolin then use to make a marmalade, cool, add the shredded pheasant meat cover and mix.
Take a crepe put a big blob of the mix in the middle and form a parcel, store in the fridge.

Next day. Take everything out of the fridge and bring up to room temp.

Take the pheasant breast out of the port and pour the port into your gravy bring to the boil and reduce again then monte au buerre.

Whilst you are making the gravy, melt a little butter in oil till it starts to sizzel then place the crepe parcels in the pan seam side down and fry slowly till sealed and crispy on that side only. Place the pillow on a warmed plate.

Flash fry the pheasant breasts, rest, slice horizontally, fan and sit on the pillow. Dress with the gravy

This dish is very impressive, it takes about 10 mins to finish as most of the work is done the day before.
I take it that we all know the importance of percy pepper and sidney salt so I did not mention them
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Old 05-11-2012, 02:54 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Harry,

It is very uncommon today to find modern professional women, who do not wax unwanted hair ! and futhermore, I cannot believe that German women do not wax !

Madré Mía, what sub topics land up on D.C.

Margi.



Margi.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
you should visit Wales
@ margi
i have no idea if they were professional or not margi,i wasn't going to get any closer than i had to,they were speaking german & talking about invading the pool area so if it walks like a duck,looks like a duck & quacks like a duck then usually...............!
@bolas
what?thought they were sheep!
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Old 05-11-2012, 12:52 PM   #19
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I really like naturally-raised Guinea Fowl. Sometimes our local Wegmans market carries them, but I usually purchase them online from D'Artagnon's Gourmet Meat, Foie Gras, Organic Poultry, Pate, Truffles, Gourmet Food Gifts and Meat Recipes, especially when they're running one of their frequent sales. Whether I order fresh or frozen, the quality is exceptional. One bird easily & adequately serves 2 people.
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Old 05-11-2012, 01:02 PM   #20
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Bolas,

Anytime, we need a truly hearty laugh, we re-read your posts !

Thanks for your good sense of humor ... You are quite funny ...

Margi.
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guinea fowl, recipe, wine

Luca’s guinea fowl in red wine I love guinea fowl, faraona as we call it in Italy. I like its taste and the fact that it reminds me of my childhood, since “faraona arrosto” (roasted guinea fowl) was one of my mother’s favorite recipes. So I was very happy when my beloved (and infinitely patient) fiancée Gabriella bought a guinea fowl, cleaned and cut into pieces, and ask me to cook it. But… Houston, we have a problem: I never cooked this bird in my entire life… However, the task was not overwhelming, I just took a look around and picked up a recipe, then simplified it and... buon appetito! Here is my easy recipe to prepare a more then decent guinea fowl au vin, mes amis, Luca’s style. And don’t be misled by its exotic name: guinea fowl was known to the ancient Romans, then disappeared from Italian desks but was served again to us pizza-eaters during the 16th century. The ingredients I used were extra virgin olive oil (2 tablespoons), 40 g butter, 150 g pancetta, 1 onion, 800 g guinea fowl cut in pieces, 40 g plain flour, 350 ml red wine, nutmeg, salt, pepper. Finely slice the onion, cut the pancetta with a knife in little dices, warm the olive oil in a saucepan, then add the butter and melt it. Add and sauté the onion on medium fire, then add the pancetta and fry it for about 4 minutes. Flour the guinea fowl pieces, season them with salt and pepper, then put them in the pan and grate some nutmeg on them. Cook the meat for about 5 minutes, turning it a couple of times. Add the red wine and stir it to mix it with the sauce already in the pan. Cover with a lid and cook for about 1 hour, maybe less, until the fowl is cooked. If needed, add some warm water during cooking. At the end, put the meat in a serving dish, then spoon the sauce in a sauce bowl and serve it (I left out the fat in excess). [IMG]http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/members/40791-albums882-picture4769.jpg[/IMG] You can eat the guinea fowl drinking the same good red wine you used for cooking: in my case, it was a Lambrusco di Sorbara, a typical wine from Emilia-Romagna. Buon appetito! 3 stars 1 reviews
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