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Old 05-12-2014, 01:02 PM   #11
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Mayo isn't American.

I always thought it was French, but I looked it up and according to Mayonnaise - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, it was invented in Spain and popularized in France.

Europeans use a lot of mayo. They use it as a garnish and as a dip for French fries, among other things.
I used to eat french fries with mayonnaise all the time in my teens, 20s and 30s. I still do sometimes, but mostly I use ketchup.
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Old 05-12-2014, 01:25 PM   #12
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Turkey Salad Club
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Old 05-12-2014, 02:41 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Mayo isn't American.

I always thought it was French, but I looked it up and according to Mayonnaise - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, it was invented in Spain and popularized in France.

Europeans use a lot of mayo. They use it as a garnish and as a dip for French fries, among other things.
Thanks for that :-) I didn't think it through before responding. The first person I ever saw dip fries in mayo was our first German exchange student, in 1993.
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Old 05-12-2014, 02:51 PM   #14
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I always assumed "club" referred to the basic sandwich structure with a variety of meats possible. I don't think I've ever seen 'club sandwich' on a menu without a meat mentioned as the modifier - "turkey club" or "roast beef club"
I have seen just "club sandwich" on menus. It includes turkey, bacon, lettuce, tomato, mayo and three slices of toasted bread. More recently, chefs have come up with many varieties, just like with other menu items.

My favorite is the turkey-apple club at a local restaurant. It's layered with turkey, white cheddar, lettuce, tomato, mayo and fresh red apples and served on three slices of cinnamon bread. So good! :-)
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Old 05-12-2014, 02:53 PM   #15
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The first tought I had when I saw di reston's question was "three slices of toasted bread". I don't ever remember seeing any menu reference that did not point out three slices of bread. I know I've never ordered one or made one for myself because I can not get my mouth opened far enough for three slices of bread and all the ingredients! Well, unless I'm yelling at someone. And yes, bacon was always listed too. But I figure bacon is a condiment for sandwiches anyway, right?
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Old 05-12-2014, 03:04 PM   #16
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When we were in Rome and Florence, mayo packets were available in the panini shops, so I would guess it's available in grocery stores, too.
That could well be. I've been to Italy a few times, including a 4-month stay in Naples many years ago. During that stay, I cooked most of my own meals and shopped in the local stores. There could have been mayo there. I just don't recall seeing it. Plus we're talking 20 years ago.

That's not to say that mayonnaise isn't used in Italy, because aioli is certainly Italian. But I have a hunch that an Italian would be more likely to just make it up from scratch, since it's so easy to do.
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Old 05-12-2014, 03:26 PM   #17
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Steve, when I moved to Denmark in 1969, I couldn't find the mayo. Then, I found out that they sell it in tubes with a pretty star shaped opening. They mostly used it to decorate open-faced sandwiches.
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Old 05-12-2014, 06:14 PM   #18
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T

Other than in Paris, I don't recall seeing mayonnaise on my travels abroad. But mayo is pretty easy to make.
Mayonnaise is available (and eaten) all over Europe - even by us benighted Brits. The Belgians even claim to have invented the combination of chips/fries and mayo as a street snack.

If you go to Menorca you'll find that menorquin chefs claim mayonnaise as a menorcan invention and that it is named after the Island's capital, Mahon (or "Mao" in the local variant of Catalan). In Spanish it's "salsa mahonesa" and in Catalan "Maonesa" (Menorca belongs to Spain but never tell a menorquin that either he or mayonnaise is Spanish).

Of course, the French may tell a different story.
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Old 05-12-2014, 06:58 PM   #19
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That could well be. I've been to Italy a few times, including a 4-month stay in Naples many years ago. During that stay, I cooked most of my own meals and shopped in the local stores. There could have been mayo there. I just don't recall seeing it. Plus we're talking 20 years ago.

.
I was eating mayonnaise in England and Menorca in the 1970s. Constance Spry used it in Coronation Chicken which she invented in commemoration of the Queen's coronation in 1953 and a "fowl" dressed with mayonnaise appears in the first edition of Mrs Beeton in 1861!
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Old 05-12-2014, 08:50 PM   #20
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I think the major difference is that Europeans seldom, if ever, use it as a spread for a sandwich, garnish yes.
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