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Old 03-21-2012, 02:49 PM   #1
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In search for the correct flour

I was at somebody's house a while ago, and they had this homemade bread. It was really amazing. Of course I've asked for recipe, but to no avail. I hate that. This site taught me to share and help. Never mind. I would like to make similar bread and I think I have even found a recipe that might reproduce the very similar bread. However it is in Russian, which is not a problem, problem that the flour they use I have never seen here in the States. The result is this bread that is not white. I am going to post a picture here to provide you with an idea. Maybe you can tell me what kind of flour you would use to get something like this. Thank you in advance everybody.

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Old 03-21-2012, 02:53 PM   #2
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Charlie, from looking at the color that could be whole wheat or light rye. What did it taste like?
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Old 03-21-2012, 03:12 PM   #3
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Did it have a rye flavor? If not, it might well be a mix of unbleached white and white whole wheat, neither of which are really white.

Flavor will tell much. If there's a hint of pumpernickle, it might be close to this:

A Simple, Rustic Loaf: King Arthur Flour

A Russian rye, to me, usually appears with deeper warmer color.

What do they call the flour in the Russian recipe? And if you think it's corrupted too much in translation, can you approximate the spelling in English or link to the recipe in Russian.
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Old 03-21-2012, 03:19 PM   #4
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No rye, no whole whet , at least not as far as taste goes. Unbleached flour maybe, but I've made things with unbleached flour and the end result was still white. In Russian they use a low grade or low quality flour. I don't really know of better translation. Tasted darn good though.
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Old 03-21-2012, 03:38 PM   #5
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So I Googled the name of russian bread. It is called Arnautka. I guess it is also a special type of wheat. But that was as much info as I found.
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Old 03-21-2012, 03:41 PM   #6
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??
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Old 03-21-2012, 03:44 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
So I Googled the name of russian bread. It is called Arnautka. I guess it is also a special type of wheat. But that was as much info as I found.

Arnautka is a type of durum wheat. Durum is generally used to make pasta.

King Arnold sells it.



King Arthur Extra Fancy Durum Flour - 3 lb.
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Old 03-21-2012, 03:57 PM   #8
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Can I make a bread out of it? In all the truth I doubt the person has bought the special flour like that jut to make bread. Just judging by the person. I hate when people do not share recipes.
Jennyema, that bread is way too dark. It was really just a bit of white color.
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Old 03-21-2012, 04:35 PM   #9
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Quote:
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Can I make a bread out of it? In all the truth I doubt the person has bought the special flour like that jut to make bread. Just judging by the person. I hate when people do not share recipes.
Jennyema, that bread is way too dark. It was really just a bit of white color.
Im not an expert but I dont think you can use 100% durum to make bread

GLC's recipe might be a closer match ...
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Old 03-21-2012, 06:20 PM   #10
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You know, if someone has a very sensitive set of tasting equipment, it can be hard to bake an exact duplicate, even with the same ingredients. Waters are different. Ovens are different. Ambient room temperatures are different. On the other hand, the differences between flours, so long as they're of similar protein content and fineness, aren't so great that you get a close approximation. And the great thing about bread is that even the failures usually taste pretty good.

Maybe it was a buckwheat bread. It comes out kind of nutty and sweet. It's a not uncommon ingredient, especially in the Ukraine, apparently.
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