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Old 09-13-2008, 04:49 PM   #1
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"NEW" Rye Bread Recipe w/pics

Ok, kids. After the rejection of good old George's rye bread with molasses and cocao by DW, I went back to the bench and came up with this rye bread that would make a Deli owner proud! I checked a few recipes, then adjusted the ingredients to where I thought it would come out right, and came up with this final draft and a delicious end product. Here we go...

Basic Homemade Rye Bread
By: Joe Valencic

INGREDIENTS:

1-1/4 t Instant Yeast
1 T sugar (I use brown sugar)
3 T melted butter
1 Egg
1 C warm milk (about 110 degrees F) (8 oz.)
1 1/2 t salt
1 C rye flour (4.6 oz.)
2 1/2 cups bleached all-purpose flour (12-1/2 oz.)
1 T caraway seeds (or more if you like more seeds)
1 t vegetable oil (to coat bowl and loaf pan)
1 large egg, beaten for egg wash

DIRECTIONS:

Combine the yeast, sugar, melted butter, egg, and milk in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a mixing whisk. Beat on low speed for 1 minute, then change to dough hook. Combine the salt, rye flour, all-purpose flour, and caraway seeds in a separate bowl and blend well, then add to liquid 1 cup at a time. Beat at low speed until all of the flour is incorporated, about 1 minute. Then, beat at medium speed until the mixture forms a ball, leaves the sides of the bowl and climbs up the dough hook. Remove the dough from the bowl. Using your hands, form the dough into a smooth ball. Lightly oil a bowl. Place the dough in the bowl and turn it to oil all sides. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside in a warm, draft-free place until it doubles in size, about 1 hour.
(This can also be done the old fashioned way by hand, using the traditional methods of blending and kneading for 5-8 minutes until smooth and elastic)

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F and lightly grease a 5 1/2 by 9-inch baking pan.

Remove the dough from the bowl and invert onto a lightly floured surface. Deflate dough by pressing your knuckles into the dough. Then gently knead the dough while shaping into a roll as long as your bread pan so that any seams disappear into the dough. Place the shaped roll in the baking pan with the seam side down. Cover with plastic wrap or a plastic bag with the handles tucked under the pan, and set aside in a warm, draft-free place until it doubles in size, about 1 hour. Use a pastry brush to brush the egg lightly over the top of the dough, then put three slashes in the dough at a 45 degree angle about deep. Bake until lightly brown, about 45 minutes. Immediately remove bread from pan and place on a cooling rack. The loaf should have a hollow sound when tapped on the bottom. If not hollow sounding, put it back in the pan and bake for another 5 minutes, or until the internal temperature reaches at least 200 degrees F. Allow to cool for a couple hours before slicing (if you can resist...I couldn't!).

Here are the pics with explanation. Hope this helps anyone trying it for the first time.

This is what the dough looks like after first rise, and shaped for the baking pan. (Freshly fed sourdough starter in the Joy jar)



This is what the dough looks like after rising for 1 hour.





Slashed before popping in the oven.



The finished product. It weighed in at 28 oz., and No, I didn't wait for it to cool. It is YUMMO!





Gotta go, time to get the walleye and potatoes going for our dinner party.

JoeV

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Old 09-13-2008, 05:14 PM   #2
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Thanks for the pics.
IMHO folks who want a light (as opposed to heavy rye bread) , don't like "real" rye bread.
My wife says your recipe is more for a cake than a bread. The bread looks pretty good to me ; but I like a heavier crust (to each his own). Your earlier post with pics of artisan bread had a beautifully colored crust. What can you reccommend for a shiney mahoganey colored crust?
I think breads generally come out better when baked for at least half the baking time on a clay surface.
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Old 09-13-2008, 05:14 PM   #3
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got as pastrami?
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Old 09-13-2008, 07:24 PM   #4
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Good job Joe, looks great to me - love rye toast !!!!, Thanks for the pics too!!!
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Old 09-13-2008, 08:32 PM   #5
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I know I will probably be considered a freak but I can NOT stand Rye bread!!!.....BUT my sweetie LOVES it!! So I will definately be saving this recipe to make for him when he returns from over seas!! Thank you and I always enjoy your pics (even if it does have rye in it!)lol
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Old 09-13-2008, 11:05 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
IMHO folks who want a light (as opposed to heavy rye bread) , don't like "real" rye bread.
Sorry that you feel that way. Are there many other foods that you hold such a narrow tolerance towards? Are there certain restaurants or cuisines that should be eliminated from planet earth because they don't meet with YOUR personal taste? Nothing very humble about your opinion my friend.

Quote:
What can you reccommend for a shiney mahoganey colored crust?
IMHO, I think you should try Minwax stain and their gloss polyurethane...two coats because the first one will get sucked in sealing the crust. You'll be the envy of the neighborhood with your shiney, mahogany heavy rye bread. Gotcha!

Joseph, who is not easily intimidated by the opinions of others.
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Old 09-13-2008, 11:10 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deelady View Post
I know I will probably be considered a freak but I can NOT stand Rye bread!!!.....BUT my sweetie LOVES it!! So I will definately be saving this recipe to make for him when he returns from over seas!! Thank you and I always enjoy your pics (even if it does have rye in it!)lol
You are NOT a freak just because don't enjoy certain foods. We all have different tastes which is why the server has to say..."white, wheat or rye?"

Thanks for the compliment on the pics. I enjoy sharing my successes, and have learned to laugh at my failures as well (remember the salami bread flatulence fiasco? I'm still laughing at myself about that one.)

Joe
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Old 09-13-2008, 11:15 PM   #8
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You may have thought it a fiasco, but everyone else wanted a slice!!

And I called myself a freak because that is what my Fiance calls me for not liking Rye, saur kraut, or mustard on my hot dogs.....he is ready to call off the wedding when ever I put ketchup on a hot dog in public!!
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Old 09-13-2008, 11:31 PM   #9
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I not only put ketchup on hot dogs, but also put it on brats. I don't care for plain yellow mustard, but I do like spicey brown mustards. Different strokes for different folks.

Joe
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Old 09-13-2008, 11:35 PM   #10
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JoeV you done a beautiful job on your bread. It looks as good as some professional bakers turn out, be proud..
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