"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches > Pancakes, Waffles & Fritters
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-09-2008, 11:21 AM   #1
Senior Cook
 
vilasman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 323
Another Pancake Question, Goodweed

Yesterday i had a hankering for some pancakes and all I had was pastry flour and bread flour... both king arthur, could I have made the pabcakes from either of those and gotten acceptable results?

__________________

__________________
vilasman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2008, 11:41 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
bethzaring's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Northern New Mexico
Posts: 4,602
not GW here, but I do have extensive experience making pancakes

the most appropriate flour for pancakes would be pastry flour. But since whole wheat pastry flour is precious in my household, I use whole wheat bread (King Arthur) flour, rye flour, buckwheat flour, ground up oats, ground up flax seed, cornmeal, basically anything that looks like flour. It all works fine for me. My technique may be different from GW's, but I can produce wonderful pancakes from most any flour. Go for it with what you have on hand.
__________________

__________________
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead
bethzaring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2008, 12:48 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
auntdot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,418
Am with bethzaring, would use the pastry flour. Don't think the bread flour would work too well.
__________________
Before criticizing a person, walk a mile in his shoes - then you are a mile away and you have his shoes!
auntdot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2008, 10:19 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: E. Pa.
Posts: 8,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring View Post
not GW here, but I do have extensive experience making pancakes

the most appropriate flour for pancakes would be pastry flour. But since whole wheat pastry flour is precious in my household, I use whole wheat bread (King Arthur) flour, rye flour, buckwheat flour, ground up oats, ground up flax seed, cornmeal, basically anything that looks like flour. It all works fine for me. My technique may be different from GW's, but I can produce wonderful pancakes from most any flour. Go for it with what you have on hand.
That is good to know any flour could be used except bread flour.
__________________
LadyCook61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2008, 12:04 PM   #5
Executive Chef
 
bethzaring's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Northern New Mexico
Posts: 4,602
Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyCook61 View Post
That is good to know any flour could be used except bread flour.
just to clarify Lady Cook, I do use bread flour in my pancakes. I used to solely use soft flour, but when I ran out of pastry flour, I used bread flour and have been using it ever since. Can still make a mean pancake with bread flour
__________________
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead
bethzaring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2008, 12:23 PM   #6
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: E. Pa.
Posts: 8,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring View Post
just to clarify Lady Cook, I do use bread flour in my pancakes. I used to solely use soft flour, but when I ran out of pastry flour, I used bread flour and have been using it ever since. Can still make a mean pancake with bread flour
oh I misunderstood. . thanks for clarifiying it.
__________________
LadyCook61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2008, 12:24 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
With bread flour, you get a slightly more chewy pancake, but that's only if you over mix it to develop the gluten. Using bread flour could give you some interesting variations. Just as you can make yeast-risen waffles, you might try making a yeast-risen batter with the bread flour to create something completely different. I would think that it would have a taste similar to danish, especially if butter was used as the fat.

I have used cake flour for pancakes. but you just have to make sure to handle them carefully when flipping as they are very delicate.

The reason I use all-purpose flour is that it gives me a very light and moist texture, while providing enough structure to hold the bubbles. Sometimes, pancakes will collapse after cooking when made with cake flour, just as a cake can if handled too roughly.

I have often times made multi-grain pancakes utilyzing rye, whole wheat, buckwheat, rolled oats, and even cream of wheat and corn flour. Pancakes are versatile, and my recipe produces a very specific type of pancake. I have other recipes for dutch babies, johnny cakes, fritters, etc.

Feel free to experiment. The worst things you can do are to produce a pancake that falls apart, or one that's a tad on the heavy or chewy side.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2008, 12:25 PM   #8
Sous Chef
 
B'sgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Utah
Posts: 863
Corn meal is excellent in pancakes, by the way.
__________________
Michelle
http://foodmakeshimsick.blogspot.com/

B'sgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2008, 05:05 PM   #9
Senior Cook
 
vilasman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 323
Well I have succeeded in cutting the pancake reciepe in half and make good pancakes...
Now... tell me the secret...
Whats the secret to getting evenly colored, golden brown pancakes, like you get at IHOP? Is it the temperature or is it the pan?
__________________
vilasman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2008, 05:20 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
It's the temperature and the timing. You must have a hot enough temperature to cook the pancakes, and yet not so hot as to scorch the outside before the inside has time to set up. When the temperature is just right, the bubbles don't start to form on the top until the pancake batter is starting to set in the bottom half. You flip the pancake when the bubbles begin to form and pop on top, and the bottom edges just start to lift from the pan. That way, the top is still runny and lays on the pan just as the bottom layer of batter did when it was spooned onto the pan. This allows even cooking across the entire surface, giving you the smooth, brow color you desire.

My dad used to wait until the bubbles turned into holes on top as they popped, signalling that the pancakes were done most of the way through. This made them easier to flip, as the set batter is firmer than is the half-cooked batter needed for a smooth surface. But they weren't as pretty.

That should clear things up for you. As to what temp is just right, well you just have to learn what's right for your equipment. My aluminum grill pan cooks perfect pancakes at a lower flame than does my aluminum, teflon coated griddle. And the heat generated by your stove is peculiar to your stove. You just have to get to know your equipment. A helpful tip is to guesstimate the correct temperature, cook a couple of trial pancakes, and adjust the temperature as needed. Even after years of cooking pancakes, I still have to do that to get the temperature just right.

Seeeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.