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Old 09-22-2015, 11:26 AM   #21
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I didn't read every word in this old thread, but one thing I got from it was the misconception that all rainbow trout are bland. The problem, as mentioned above, is that most of the rainbow trout that people see these days is farm raised. It is never going to be anything like wild trout. Also size makes a big difference. A 5 pound wild rainbow is going to be nothing like a 12 inch farm raised one. The meat of a wild rainbow will be pink and salmon-like, full of omega 3, and quite delicious. The same is true of most wild trout when it has the opportunity to grow for a few years.

I've caught brown, rainbow, cutthroat, Dolly Varden (in Montana we called them bull trout), California golden, brook (I've caught 14-15 inch brookies - fabulous), and all make great eating. Sure they are different from most saltwater fish, just as roughy is different from grouper is different from wahoo, and on and on. Trout species are different from each other, and even within a species the taste and texture can vary with size and environment. The ones I used to catch lived in clean, cold water, mostly in the mountains of Montana and Colorado. My fishing was mostly back in the 60's and 70's. I haven't wetted a line in freshwater for more than 25 years.

It takes a couple of years for a hatchery raised fingerling to to take on the properties of a wild native trout. Strict regulations have at least given them a chance at that these days, but it's so difficult to catch anything that's within the very strict legal limits in Colorado that I just don't fish any more. I never could get into catch and release - I want to eat what I work that hard for.
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Old 09-22-2015, 11:55 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I didn't read every word in this old thread, but one thing I got from it was the misconception that all rainbow trout are bland. The problem, as mentioned above, is that most of the rainbow trout that people see these days is farm raised. It is never going to be anything like wild trout. Also size makes a big difference. A 5 pound wild rainbow is going to be nothing like a 12 inch farm raised one. The meat of a wild rainbow will be pink and salmon-like, full of omega 3, and quite delicious. The same is true of most wild trout when it has the opportunity to grow for a few years.

I've caught brown, rainbow, cutthroat, Dolly Varden (in Montana we called them bull trout), California golden, brook (I've caught 14-15 inch brookies - fabulous), and all make great eating. Sure they are different from most saltwater fish, just as roughy is different from grouper is different from wahoo, and on and on. Trout species are different from each other, and even within a species the taste and texture can vary with size and environment. The ones I used to catch lived in clean, cold water, mostly in the mountains of Montana and Colorado. My fishing was mostly back in the 60's and 70's. I haven't wetted a line in freshwater for more than 25 years.

It takes a couple of years for a hatchery raised fingerling to to take on the properties of a wild native trout. Strict regulations have at least given them a chance at that these days, but it's so difficult to catch anything that's within the very strict legal limits in Colorado that I just don't fish any more. I never could get into catch and release - I want to eat what I work that hard for.
+1
That wonderful pink color in wild trout comes from eating little critters on the stream bed that fly-fisherman call scuds. Th skuds are like little vacuum, cleaners and eat leaf litter and vegetable matter, including green stuff. The scuds are high in beta carotene, as are all of the freshwater shrimp species. The beta carotene-rich flesh is a sure sign that the trout come from clean, well oxygenated water. And if you're eating brookies, the water has to be cold as well.

If the trout is white-fleshed, it is probably from a hatchery, and will have less of that wonderful trout flavor.

Side note, I once purchased salmon from a local supermarket. The color of the flesh was perfect and I was expecting a treat. As I cooked the fish, the orange dye leached out of the fish and into the pan drippings. I was appalled that the flesh was dyed. To me, this is like false advertising, and is a way of fooling the customer into purchasing something of lesser quality. Make sure of you source if you are buying fish. That's all I'm saying about that.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 09-22-2015, 12:22 PM   #23
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Side note, I once purchased salmon from a local supermarket. The color of the flesh was perfect and I was expecting a treat. As I cooked the fish, the orange dye leached out of the fish and into the pan drippings. I was appalled that the flesh was dyed. To me, this is like false advertising, and is a way of fooling the customer into purchasing something of lesser quality. Make sure of you source if you are buying fish. That's all I'm saying about that.
I was looking at the fish counter at Kroger yesterday while I waited for the butcher to cut and wrap a pork loin for me and they had salmon with a sign that said it had color added. If it isn't now, it should be a requirement to mark it that way.
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Old 09-23-2015, 05:38 PM   #24
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Farm raised salmon has color added. Wild caught in WA or AK does not.

I scale trout and get all the dirt off the skin, they will taste much better - there are 100 scales per inch on a trout and each scale has microscopic dirt under them. I scale all salmon and eat the skin. If you skin a salmon and fry in hot oil you will love it.
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Old 09-23-2015, 10:22 PM   #25
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Farm raised salmon has color added. Wild caught in WA or AK does not.

I scale trout and get all the dirt off the skin, they will taste much better - there are 100 scales per inch on a trout and each scale has microscopic dirt under them. I scale all salmon and eat the skin. If you skin a salmon and fry in hot oil you will love it.
Wild caught in the Great Lakes is also pristine, with deep, orange flesh. And it's yummy.

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Old 09-24-2015, 08:25 AM   #26
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That looks like an interesting method. I have some frozen halibut fillets etc. I'll give your method a try with some halibut.
I only get fresh caught steelhead from the Skeena river area.
Great fishing up there!
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Old 09-24-2015, 12:06 PM   #27
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I've had wild trout cut in the mount springs of Georgia, the country, not the state. Where water runs absolutely clear.The fish tastes so fish and amazing, I have never tasted anything better. As far as fish goes.
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Old 09-24-2015, 01:08 PM   #28
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If yuou love the flavor of steelhead, as I do, try this little trick that I found by being simply lazy one night. Take a generous steehead fillet that is frozen solid, and drop it into 360' oil, completely naked.
A spatter cover is highly recommended
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Old 09-24-2015, 01:11 PM   #29
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I've had wild trout cut in the mount springs of Georgia, the country, not the state. Where water runs absolutely clear.The fish tastes so fish and amazing, I have never tasted anything better. As far as fish goes.
My grandparents were from Georgia (the country). Visited there a couple of times. Yes it's a beautiful country! We had fresh caught trout but in all honesty I don't recall them tasting any better than the fish I catch locally. No offense.
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Old 09-24-2015, 01:33 PM   #30
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A spatter cover is highly recommended
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