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Old 10-09-2011, 12:32 PM   #11
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That is true, but ...
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There is no but about it.
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Old 10-09-2011, 01:03 PM   #12
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I love how this guy makes a roux.

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Old 10-09-2011, 01:35 PM   #13
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There is no but about it.
Really? I take it you have a lot of experience with Cajun cooking?

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Old 10-09-2011, 01:45 PM   #14
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Roux's are created for many diverse dishes and they are a thickener for soups, stews, gravies and sauces.

Let's get back to the OPs question of what he should be using as the base for his shrimp etouffe.
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Old 10-09-2011, 01:51 PM   #15
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The biggest typical difference between Jambalaya and Etouffee is that Jambalaya includes many proteins (chicken and sausage and etc...) where Etouffee includes only one and is most often a seafood.

Jambalaya is a combination or melding of ingredients.

Etouffee stems from Louisiana French, "à l'étouffée" meaning braised

.40
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Old 10-09-2011, 02:27 PM   #16
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Really? I take it you have a lot of experience with Cajun cooking?

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The answer to both of those questions is yes.
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Old 10-09-2011, 02:34 PM   #17
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The biggest typical difference between Jambalaya and Etouffee is that Jambalaya includes many proteins (chicken and sausage and etc...) where Etouffee includes only one and is most often a seafood.

Jambalaya is a combination or melding of ingredients.

Etouffee stems from Louisiana French, "à l'étouffée" meaning braised

.40

I thought étouffée meant smothered. But maybe that's the same thing from another angle.

To me, étouffée is a saucy dish. Shrimp in a gravy/sauce served over white rice. In contrast, jambalaya is dry (not saucy) seasoned rice dish with proteins and veggies mixed in. At least that's the way I make it.
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Old 10-09-2011, 02:41 PM   #18
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Let's get back to the OPs question of what he should be using as the base for his shrimp etouffe.
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Old 10-09-2011, 02:46 PM   #19
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I thought étouffée meant smothered. But maybe that's the same thing from another angle.

To me, étouffée is a saucy dish. Shrimp in a gravy/sauce served over white rice. In contrast, jambalaya is dry (not saucy) seasoned rice dish with proteins and veggies mixed in. At least that's the way I make it.
There is a great deal of variation in the way these dishes are prepared and I think that's why they are so hard to nail down.

My French Cajun aunt Cherelyn made jambalaya that was red-eye gravy based. Treebeard's in downtown Houston serves a tomato based version with lots of peppers, celery, and onions. Treebeards is one of my favorite lunch stops BTW.

This may simply be a case of one man's Jambalaya is another man's Etouffee.

.40
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Old 10-09-2011, 02:50 PM   #20
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This may simply be a case of one man's Jambalaya is another man's Etouffee.

.40
Well stated, .40! And what a beautiful name your aunt had, sure makes me think of French Cajun!
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