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Old 05-21-2009, 05:17 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
Steaming trout would be a shame!
It's one of my favorite foods. I like to spread a thin film of good mustard on top the fillet to hold the crumbs and then coat the top with seasoned panko crumbs. I usually chop up some fresh herb of choice and mix with salt, pepper and the crumbs. Get some oil good and hot in your pan and then lay the fillets in with the topping side DOWN. Watch it carefully, and turn over when the pan releases them. When I turn them face up, I add a little lemon juice, dry vermouth or white wine to the pan (just a couple of tablespoons) and put a lid on the pan for about 4 -5 minutes. The wine and oil make a little sauce to pour over the fish after you plate it.
Sounds very good! I'm always looking for good trout recipes - flavors that will not overpower the taste of the trout, but still add taste. Thanks!
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Old 05-21-2009, 05:35 PM   #12
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Thirty years ago, I would have argued that to do anything other than dredging in flour and pan frying with a little salt would simply be sacriligeous. I grew up fishing U.P. Michigan trout streams with my Dad and loved ried trout. But after I moved out of my Dad's home as an adult, I married a woman who's not crazy about strong fish flavors, even though trout is a mild fish flavor. When we'd go camping, and I'd come back to camp with some fresh brookies, or rainbows, we'd pack the headless, cleaned fish into a foil pack with potatoes, butter, a bit of salt, and sliced carrot. The packs would then be placed into the fire for abotu a half hour. When protien of any kind is cooked in a foil pack, it is steamed. The flavor is delicate with a flaky texture. It perfectly compliments the other ingredients, with all flavors remaining seperate. So though I'm a true lover of pan-fried trout, I am also a fan of foil-pouch trout with veggies, broiled trout with butter, salt, and herbs, baked trout with taragon, garlic and a squeeze of lemon juice, and many other presentations of this wonderful fish.

Trout almondine is great, as is blue trout. Don't be afraid to get creative. Throw it on the grill over indirect heat with applewood for smoke. lightly salt both sides of the fillet. Cover, cook, and enjoy.

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Old 05-31-2009, 04:08 PM   #13
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my favorite fish needs nothing but a little butter to soften the blow when it hits the CI fyring pan.
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Old 05-31-2009, 04:46 PM   #14
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in a basket over a wood fire
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Old 05-31-2009, 07:32 PM   #15
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Catching 'em on spinners and spoons, cooking them every which way, eating them with fork or fingers, I love trout. Brookies are the best, steelhead is meaty, the closely related chars are moist and delicate.

Go ahead and cook them whole. The head, bones and fins will separate from the flesh like magic, and your dinner guests will be impressed.

One of my favorite ways is same as ChefJune's, using the spiciest mustard in my frig and panko seasoned with celery leaves. I've also poached gigantic rainbow trout slowly in rice wine, tsuyu (soy and dashi), lots of ginger and scallion julienne, and other ingredients. And, it is heavenly good smoked.
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Old 06-01-2009, 05:35 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by chopsticks View Post
Catching 'em on spinners and spoons, cooking them every which way, eating them with fork or fingers, I love trout. Brookies are the best, steelhead is meaty, the closely related chars are moist and delicate.

Go ahead and cook them whole. The head, bones and fins will separate from the flesh like magic, and your dinner guests will be impressed.

One of my favorite ways is same as ChefJune's, using the spiciest mustard in my frig and panko seasoned with celery leaves. I've also poached gigantic rainbow trout slowly in rice wine, tsuyu (soy and dashi), lots of ginger and scallion julienne, and other ingredients. And, it is heavenly good smoked.
Brookies are actually members of the Char family. Just so's ya knows.

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Old 06-03-2009, 12:14 PM   #17
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My BIL makes some awesome smoked trout.
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Old 06-13-2009, 11:03 AM   #18
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Steaming trout? You have to be kidding! I like to melt a little butter in some olive oil, then saute until the skin turns crispy. If you do this on medium heat the middle should be cooked just about right when both sides are crispy. Having NOT grown up eating trout (or fresh fish of any kind), my husband informed me that the skin is the best part, and it does crisp up very nicely. THEN I deglaze the pan with either lemon juice or white wine and toss in a few capers, drizzle it all over the trout and some rice pilaf or couscous. Then, being lazy at times, those great flavored almond slivers you buy in the salad section of the grocery get scattered over the top. Yes, we just had this last week.
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