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Old 08-13-2017, 06:59 AM   #1
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It's Garlic Time!

Just got this batch from a local customer of ours..three types..Polish, Purple Stripe, and Racambole..

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Old 08-13-2017, 07:28 AM   #2
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Are those what they call hard necks, or stiff necks, or something like that? They say that the more colorful the garlic is, the tastier (less pungent/more sweet) it is. I'm not sure if that's true, but if so, you hit a good load.
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Old 08-13-2017, 07:47 AM   #3
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Are those what they call hard necks, or stiff necks, or something like that? They say that the more colorful the garlic is, the tastier (less pungent/more sweet) it is. I'm not sure if that's true, but if so, you hit a good load.
They are hard neck varieties....some are stronger than others...I have more coming from my brother who always gives me a batch every year...I hang them in mesh bags along the stairway to the basement..should last me well into the spring..
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Old 08-13-2017, 09:31 AM   #4
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I was in Wisconsin last week at a farmer's market and picked up a dozen bulbs of different varieties (mostly hard-neck). Unfortunately, the vendor threw them all into the same bag before I had a chance to write down what was what.
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Old 08-13-2017, 09:38 AM   #5
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I was in Wisconsin last week at a farmer's market and picked up a dozen bulbs of different varieties (mostly hard-neck). Unfortunately, the vendor threw them all into the same bag before I had a chance to write down what was what.
Should be easy enough to identify them if you were ever so inclined...there is tons of info with good photos available...
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Old 08-13-2017, 10:55 AM   #6
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Should be easy enough to identify them if you were ever so inclined...there is tons of info with good photos available...
The one I can identify for certain is called Georgian Fire. I used to grow it myself, and it's my favorite.

The others were just kind of mish-mash of varieties, including some I had never even heard of.
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Old 08-13-2017, 11:45 AM   #7
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I've been growing 6 or so kinds of garlic now for 6 or 7 years. They can be difficult to tell apart especially if they don't get labeled through all parts of harvest, the growing, curing, storing, and saving the cloves for growing again.

The hardneck varieties don't last as long as the softneck varieties in storage. The hardnecks are mostly grown in the northern part of north america, the softnecks in the lower parts.

We grew 4 kinds this past year, they are all curing under a tarp on our deck overhang. We will be switching 2 out and getting just one new kind for planting this fall.

Rock, that picture of your garlic is beautiful!
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Old 08-13-2017, 11:50 AM   #8
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Can you just put a store bought cloves in the ground and grow your own garlic?
It is stocked in every store here, but sometimes the quality is not the best.
I have a very small garden and would gladly make room for some garlic.
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Old 08-13-2017, 11:57 AM   #9
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Can you just put a store bought cloves in the ground and grow your own garlic?
It is stocked in every store here, but sometimes the quality is not the best.
I have a very small garden and would gladly make room for some garlic.
Sure you can. We did that when we first started and we found that we didn't know the 'type' of garlic, but if that doesn't matter, then use store bought cloves. If you live in the north, look for garlic with a stiff hard neck, and for people in the southern areas, look for garlic that can have a soft neck, like in braids (only softneck can be braided very well). This is so the weather suits your garlic and they'll be bigger and more healthy. Avoid garlic with the entire bottom roots shaved off, that means it is probably from another country (where importing requires, no roots and no dirt attached). Looking at Rock's picture, you can see roots cut off but not completely removed--that is locally grown and not imported.
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Old 08-13-2017, 12:04 PM   #10
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What she said ^^^ Whenever garlic sprouts in my kitchen, I put it in the ground.
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:15 PM   #11
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I did it one year with huge cloves. I had them in my dress pocket and had forgotten about them being in there. I was sitting out of the porch and found them, so I just went down the steps and planted them. Next year I had two huge bulbs of garlic. Sure worked for me.
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:36 PM   #12
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Do you plant cloves, whole bulbs or both?

How deep to plant?
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:42 PM   #13
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Do you plant cloves, whole bulbs or both?

How deep to plant?
We plant in october/november, plant 1 inch deep, 8 inches apart. Plant cloves only, pointy end up, root end down. Here's my link on growing it.
Joy's Garlic
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Old 08-13-2017, 09:24 PM   #14
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There's a garlic farm, not too far from me, that gives a lecture in September on how to grow garlic, tips ... Im looking forward to going. They also sell seed garlic. I had real good luck with the varieties that I grew this year. That being said , I think it will be great to pick up some seed garlic from a local professional. This way I know it is a variety that is good for local conditions.
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Old 08-13-2017, 09:37 PM   #15
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It reminds me that I am not in Monterey this week for car week.

Ross (Just Cooking) can tell you all about that. He lives a short drive away from the garlic capital of the world, Gillroy. I know I am almost to Monterey when I smell the garlic.

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Old 08-13-2017, 11:42 PM   #16
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Rock, ya gotta make Camarones al Ajillo with some of your garlic.

It's too simple and too good. Just 4 ingredients for the marinade (fresh parsley, salt, olive oil, and shrimp) that ends up being the sauce as well.
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Old 08-14-2017, 12:11 PM   #17
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Sure you can. We did that when we first started and we found that we didn't know the 'type' of garlic, but if that doesn't matter, then use store bought cloves. If you live in the north, look for garlic with a stiff hard neck, and for people in the southern areas, look for garlic that can have a soft neck, like in braids (only softneck can be braided very well). This is so the weather suits your garlic and they'll be bigger and more healthy. Avoid garlic with the entire bottom roots shaved off, that means it is probably from another country (where importing requires, no roots and no dirt attached). Looking at Rock's picture, you can see roots cut off but not completely removed--that is locally grown and not imported.
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
We plant in october/november, plant 1 inch deep, 8 inches apart. Plant cloves only, pointy end up, root end down. Here's my link on growing it.
Joy's Garlic
Thanks. I'm going to plant some this fall.

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There's a garlic farm, not too far from me, that gives a lecture in September on how to grow garlic, tips ... Im looking forward to going. They also sell seed garlic. I had real good luck with the varieties that I grew this year. That being said , I think it will be great to pick up some seed garlic from a local professional. This way I know it is a variety that is good for local conditions.
I will look for seed garlic. But garlic I not very popular here in Upstate SC.
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Old 08-14-2017, 12:37 PM   #18
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Here are some possibilities for garlic found at farmer's markets and CSA's in South Carolina. Find Local Garlic from South Carolina Farms and More! | Agrilicious!
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Old 08-15-2017, 03:11 PM   #19
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In most of the country, plant garlic in the fall and harvest in June or July. Garlic does not fight weeds well, so mulch is a good idea, and garlic needs rich soil for big heads. I have grown grocery store garlic for a long time.
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Old 08-15-2017, 03:57 PM   #20
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I hang them in mesh bags along the stairway to the basement.
Does that keep the vampires from coming upstairs?
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