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Old 08-30-2013, 11:47 AM   #11
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Regardless of the altitude, I'd say it depends on the artichoke. Where I live, I steam them for about 30 minutes normally, but if they're older and tougher, then maybe another 10 minutes longer. Where you live it might take as long as an hour. All you need to do is check them every 10 minutes. They're done when you can easily pull out a leaf near the middle.
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Old 08-30-2013, 12:07 PM   #12
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The boiling point of water drops with increased altitude so once the water begins to boil, it will still take longer to cook than boiling at sea level. See the chart below:


Altitude, ft Boiling point of water, F
0' (0m) 212F (100C)
500' (152.4m) 211.1F (99.5C)
1,000' (304.8m) 210.2F (99C)
2,000' (609.6m) 208.4F (98C)
5,000' (1524m) 203F (95C)
6,000' (1828.8m) 201.1F (94C)
8,000' (2438.4m) 197.4F (91.9C)
10,000' (3048m) 193.6F (89.8C)
12,000' (3657.6m) 189.8F (87.6C)
14,000' (4267.2m) 185.9F (85.5C)
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Old 08-31-2013, 08:28 AM   #13
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I have only ever had Jerusalem artichokes. Lawks, never again, got very windy in the bottom department .
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Old 08-31-2013, 12:34 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
The boiling point of water drops with increased altitude so once the water begins to boil, it will still take longer to cook than boiling at sea level. See the chart below:


Altitude, ft Boiling point of water, F
0' (0m) 212F (100C)
500' (152.4m) 211.1F (99.5C)
1,000' (304.8m) 210.2F (99C)
2,000' (609.6m) 208.4F (98C)
5,000' (1524m) 203F (95C)
6,000' (1828.8m) 201.1F (94C)
8,000' (2438.4m) 197.4F (91.9C)
10,000' (3048m) 193.6F (89.8C)
12,000' (3657.6m) 189.8F (87.6C)
14,000' (4267.2m) 185.9F (85.5C)
Also, if you cover the pot with a tight fitting lid, you increase the pressure enough to get back most of the loss.

I used that trick when trying to make decent coffee when camping above 10,000 ft in Co.
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