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Old 03-16-2015, 05:33 PM   #31
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Blackitty, Here's a recipe tailor made for your enameled cast iron. Now you have to understand, this is going to take the better part of a day, though I made mine in about 2 hours as I used a pressure cooker. I made baked beans from dried beans on Saturday and they were the best I think I ever made. As I said, I used a pressure cooker to initially cook the beans until they were good and tender, which took an hour and a half start to finish, but I'll modify the technique here for you.

The Chief's Baked Beans
1 lb. pink or navy beans, your choice
6 cups water
1 tsp. Kosher salt
Mollases (I'll explain why there is no quantity in the technique portion)
Dark Brown Sugar (again I'll explain the quantity with the technique)
4 drops mesquite flavored liquid smoke
1 1/2 cups diced ham
1 yellow onion, peeled and diced

Clean and rinse the dried beans. Place in a pot with 6 cups of cold water and bring to a boil. When they are boiling, turn off the heat, cover, and let sit for twenty minutes.

When the twenty minutes has elapsed, drain the beans and cover with six cups of fresh water. Add a tsp. of salt, and three more drips of liquid smoke, cover, turn heat to simmer, and simmer for two and one-half hours. Remove the lid, and ass about a tbs. of molasses. Stir it in and taste the broth. Add a little more and taste again. You have the right amount when you can just start to taste the molasses.

Now, do the same with the brown sugar, only start with a quarter cup. Add more by tablespoons until you get the balance of molasses and brown sugar that you want. Add the diced onion, cover and begin simmering.

Lightly brown the diced ham, then stir into the beans. Cover and place into a 250'oven. Now just walk away. Go play with the kids, or your spouse, or read a book. Let the beans slowly bake for about four hours.

Serve these with something really good. All by themselves, they can steal the show.

I got rave review from the crew who ate them at our pot luck. Some said they were the best they'd ever had, no kidding. I thought they were the best I'd personally made, but maybe not the best I'd ever had. I think the best I'd ever had were very close to what I made, but with just a little chili powder added.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 03-16-2015, 06:30 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I agree Addie! I made ciabatta bread on Sunday (well, it was started on Saturday evening, but finished Sunday), and it came out exactly like the photos on the Artisan Bread Baking website. The recipe makes 3 loaves, and I was so excited and proud of it that I gave 2 of them away. Now I have to make it again so my wife and I have some.
Just remember, after the first day, it will go stale very quickly. So unless you and your wife can eat a whole loaf the first day, be prepared to make breadcrumbs.
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Old 03-17-2015, 01:44 PM   #33
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Blackitty, I just want you to know, I enjoy your enthusiasm so much. Some of us old timers forget what it was like when we first started out in the kitchen. Although I still get excited when something I bake or cook looks like the picture in the book. Then I know there is hope for me. Even if I am cooking for just one person. Don't ever lose your enthusiasm.
There is something really fun about taking ingredients, none of which you'd want to sit down and eat a plate of on their own, and making them into something that is good. Then, making it again, but better. Tweaking it until you really like it a lot.

It's fun to try new spices, too. I ordered and received a bunch with recipes - you get a book and all the spices it uses. I'm eager to make some of that, but have mostly been sprinkling them on peanut butter (which I made myself in the food processor I am no longer afraid to use.) Some of those strong spices actually go very well with basic PB on basic bread.

I kept working on one cake. I haven't made any treat but that same cake, over and over. I wanted to get it right and finally did. Now I don't know what I did, so have learned that I should measure that little stuff and write it down.

I've never had a hobby. I think I have one now, lol. I don't know what I'm going to do once I've learned it all and can do it well enough...but I'm starting to realize that there is a whole world of food out there. Even (gasp!) foreign food!

I live not too far from Disney World and almost never go there, but they have a theme park where half of it is just restaurants and gift shops. They charge a fortune for the food (on top of entrance fees) so we never eat there, but I dragged a friend into the Moroccan one just so I could try the food and get ideas, lol. Must seek out non-amusement park restaurants. :)

I spent my entire life eschewing anything that sounded at all foreign (at any foreign restaurant, I'd be checking first: "Do they have a burger for those of us who don't like that stuff?"...and now I'm all into wanting to try it.

I do feel a bit like a kid who found a new toy. And like a fool for waiting a lifetime before bothering to learn any of this. Better late than never, I guess.
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Old 03-17-2015, 01:52 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Blackitty, Here's a recipe tailor made for your enameled cast iron. Now you have to understand, this is going to take the better part of a day, though I made mine in about 2 hours as I used a pressure cooker. I made baked beans from dried beans on Saturday and they were the best I think I ever made. As I said, I used a pressure cooker to initially cook the beans until they were good and tender, which took an hour and a half start to finish, but I'll modify the technique here for you.

The Chief's Baked Beans
1 lb. pink or navy beans, your choice
6 cups water
1 tsp. Kosher salt
Mollases (I'll explain why there is no quantity in the technique portion)
Dark Brown Sugar (again I'll explain the quantity with the technique)
4 drops mesquite flavored liquid smoke
1 1/2 cups diced ham
1 yellow onion, peeled and diced

Clean and rinse the dried beans. Place in a pot with 6 cups of cold water and bring to a boil. When they are boiling, turn off the heat, cover, and let sit for twenty minutes.

When the twenty minutes has elapsed, drain the beans and cover with six cups of fresh water. Add a tsp. of salt, and three more drips of liquid smoke, cover, turn heat to simmer, and simmer for two and one-half hours. Remove the lid, and ass about a tbs. of molasses. Stir it in and taste the broth. Add a little more and taste again. You have the right amount when you can just start to taste the molasses.

Now, do the same with the brown sugar, only start with a quarter cup. Add more by tablespoons until you get the balance of molasses and brown sugar that you want. Add the diced onion, cover and begin simmering.

Lightly brown the diced ham, then stir into the beans. Cover and place into a 250'oven. Now just walk away. Go play with the kids, or your spouse, or read a book. Let the beans slowly bake for about four hours.

Serve these with something really good. All by themselves, they can steal the show.

I got rave review from the crew who ate them at our pot luck. Some said they were the best they'd ever had, no kidding. I thought they were the best I'd personally made, but maybe not the best I'd ever had. I think the best I'd ever had were very close to what I made, but with just a little chili powder added.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
It's like you read my mind. Last night, I was googling and looking in books recipes for baked beans! I'm going to make this.

Have to get molasses. Before I'm done, I'm going to know where everything is in the grocery store. :)

Thank you!
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Old 03-17-2015, 02:15 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackitty View Post
It's like you read my mind. Last night, I was googling and looking in books recipes for baked beans! I'm going to make this.

Have to get molasses. Before I'm done, I'm going to know where everything is in the grocery store. :)

Thank you!
I've also used maple syrup instead of molasses and brown sugar. It was very good as well. With the molasses and brown sugar, yellow mustard adds a great flavor, but you have to be careful when addidng it. A little too much spoils the dish. So follow the rules, add a little, stir it in, taste it, and adjust until it's just right.

Let me know how yours turn out.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
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Old 03-17-2015, 03:17 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Blackitty, Here's a recipe tailor made for your enameled cast iron. Now you have to understand, this is going to take the better part of a day, though I made mine in about 2 hours as I used a pressure cooker. I made baked beans from dried beans on Saturday and they were the best I think I ever made. As I said, I used a pressure cooker to initially cook the beans until they were good and tender, which took an hour and a half start to finish, but I'll modify the technique here for you.

The Chief's Baked Beans
1 lb. pink or navy beans, your choice
6 cups water
1 tsp. Kosher salt
Mollases (I'll explain why there is no quantity in the technique portion)
Dark Brown Sugar (again I'll explain the quantity with the technique)
4 drops mesquite flavored liquid smoke
1 1/2 cups diced ham
1 yellow onion, peeled and diced

Clean and rinse the dried beans. Place in a pot with 6 cups of cold water and bring to a boil. When they are boiling, turn off the heat, cover, and let sit for twenty minutes.

When the twenty minutes has elapsed, drain the beans and cover with six cups of fresh water. Add a tsp. of salt, and three more drips of liquid smoke, cover, turn heat to simmer, and simmer for two and one-half hours. Remove the lid, and ass about a tbs. of molasses. Stir it in and taste the broth. Add a little more and taste again. You have the right amount when you can just start to taste the molasses.

Now, do the same with the brown sugar, only start with a quarter cup. Add more by tablespoons until you get the balance of molasses and brown sugar that you want. Add the diced onion, cover and begin simmering.

Lightly brown the diced ham, then stir into the beans. Cover and place into a 250'oven. Now just walk away. Go play with the kids, or your spouse, or read a book. Let the beans slowly bake for about four hours.

Serve these with something really good. All by themselves, they can steal the show.

I got rave review from the crew who ate them at our pot luck. Some said they were the best they'd ever had, no kidding. I thought they were the best I'd personally made, but maybe not the best I'd ever had. I think the best I'd ever had were very close to what I made, but with just a little chili powder added.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

Yum. Im gonna make those this weekend!
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Old 03-17-2015, 04:15 PM   #37
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Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Blackitty, Here's a recipe tailor made for your enameled cast iron. Now you have to understand, this is going to take the better part of a day, though I made mine in about 2 hours as I used a pressure cooker. I made baked beans from dried beans on Saturday and they were the best I think I ever made. As I said, I used a pressure cooker to initially cook the beans until they were good and tender, which took an hour and a half start to finish, but I'll modify the technique here for you.

The Chief's Baked Beans
1 lb. pink or navy beans, your choice
6 cups water
1 tsp. Kosher salt
Mollases (I'll explain why there is no quantity in the technique portion)
Dark Brown Sugar (again I'll explain the quantity with the technique)
4 drops mesquite flavored liquid smoke
1 1/2 cups diced ham
1 yellow onion, peeled and diced

Clean and rinse the dried beans. Place in a pot with 6 cups of cold water and bring to a boil. When they are boiling, turn off the heat, cover, and let sit for twenty minutes.

When the twenty minutes has elapsed, drain the beans and cover with six cups of fresh water. Add a tsp. of salt, and three more drips of liquid smoke, cover, turn heat to simmer, and simmer for two and one-half hours. Remove the lid, and ass about a tbs. of molasses. Stir it in and taste the broth. Add a little more and taste again. You have the right amount when you can just start to taste the molasses.

Now, do the same with the brown sugar, only start with a quarter cup. Add more by tablespoons until you get the balance of molasses and brown sugar that you want. Add the diced onion, cover and begin simmering.

Lightly brown the diced ham, then stir into the beans. Cover and place into a 250'oven. Now just walk away. Go play with the kids, or your spouse, or read a book. Let the beans slowly bake for about four hours.

Serve these with something really good. All by themselves, they can steal the show.

I got rave review from the crew who ate them at our pot luck. Some said they were the best they'd ever had, no kidding. I thought they were the best I'd personally made, but maybe not the best I'd ever had. I think the best I'd ever had were very close to what I made, but with just a little chili powder added.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
I copied this one down and plan to make it the next time I smoke a shoulder for pulled pork. Since both involve a lot of waiting around, they should be a good match, and who doesn't like baked beans with a pork barbecue?
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Old 03-27-2015, 07:22 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Blackitty, Here's a recipe tailor made for your enameled cast iron. Now you have to understand, this is going to take the better part of a day, though I made mine in about 2 hours as I used a pressure cooker. I made baked beans from dried beans on Saturday and they were the best I think I ever made. As I said, I used a pressure cooker to initially cook the beans until they were good and tender, which took an hour and a half start to finish, but I'll modify the technique here for you.

The Chief's Baked Beans
1 lb. pink or navy beans, your choice
6 cups water
1 tsp. Kosher salt
Mollases (I'll explain why there is no quantity in the technique portion)
Dark Brown Sugar (again I'll explain the quantity with the technique)
4 drops mesquite flavored liquid smoke
1 1/2 cups diced ham
1 yellow onion, peeled and diced

Clean and rinse the dried beans. Place in a pot with 6 cups of cold water and bring to a boil. When they are boiling, turn off the heat, cover, and let sit for twenty minutes.

When the twenty minutes has elapsed, drain the beans and cover with six cups of fresh water. Add a tsp. of salt, and three more drips of liquid smoke, cover, turn heat to simmer, and simmer for two and one-half hours. Remove the lid, and ass about a tbs. of molasses. Stir it in and taste the broth. Add a little more and taste again. You have the right amount when you can just start to taste the molasses.

Now, do the same with the brown sugar, only start with a quarter cup. Add more by tablespoons until you get the balance of molasses and brown sugar that you want. Add the diced onion, cover and begin simmering.

Lightly brown the diced ham, then stir into the beans. Cover and place into a 250'oven. Now just walk away. Go play with the kids, or your spouse, or read a book. Let the beans slowly bake for about four hours.

Serve these with something really good. All by themselves, they can steal the show.

I got rave review from the crew who ate them at our pot luck. Some said they were the best they'd ever had, no kidding. I thought they were the best I'd personally made, but maybe not the best I'd ever had. I think the best I'd ever had were very close to what I made, but with just a little chili powder added.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Hope you see this.

I made those beans and they were good! I went with pink beans because I never had those before and I couldn't find Mesquite Liquid Smoke, so I used the one with the logs on the front. Seemed as mesquitey as I could get.

I found out that my stove sucks. The burners can't seem to make anything simmer for a long time. It's either hot with no bubbles or bubbling too much. Maybe I need a new stove. So, I was back-and-forth to the stove while it simmered, but the beans seemed no worse for wear. I think.

I wasn't sure about the brown sugar. I like amounts! But I did it and kept adding more until I liked it. Then I felt a wee, tiny bit like a hot-shot cook who makes things without being a total recipe slave.

Otherwise, I followed the recipe. And it came out a little runny (should it have? Was that my error?) but thickened up a bit as it sat.

Thank you very much for this. :)
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Old 03-27-2015, 07:31 AM   #39
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Originally Posted by Blackitty View Post
Hope you see this.

I made those beans and they were good! I went with pink beans because I never had those before and I couldn't find Mesquite Liquid Smoke, so I used the one with the logs on the front. Seemed as mesquitey as I could get.

I found out that my stove sucks. The burners can't seem to make anything simmer for a long time. It's either hot with no bubbles or bubbling too much. Maybe I need a new stove. So, I was back-and-forth to the stove while it simmered, but the beans seemed no worse for wear. I think.

I wasn't sure about the brown sugar. I like amounts! But I did it and kept adding more until I liked it. Then I felt a wee, tiny bit like a hot-shot cook who makes things without being a total recipe slave.

Otherwise, I followed the recipe. And it came out a little runny (should it have? Was that my error?) but thickened up a bit as it sat.

Thank you very much for this. :)
Actually, making it runny is important, as long as it's not soup. The sugar absorbs sugar and can make the beans hard again. Keeping it runny at first creates enough moister for the sugar to absorb, and the beans to absorb as well. As the beans absorb some of that syrupy goodness, they also take in flavor.

If it's too runny after simmering for an hour or so, take the lid off of the pot and let the excess water evaporate until you get the consistency you like.

I'm glad your beans turned out tasty. And you're welcome. It's always a pleasure to share. Oh, and by learning to adjust the flavors of foods, as they are cooking, you are well on the way to becoming queen of your kitchen.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
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