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Old 10-02-2013, 05:09 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I thought it was because "kasserolle" is the Danish and Norwegian word for a saucepan or other cooking pot. (In Swedish it's kastrull).

We went to a pub in Copenhagen and Stirling ordered "Friedas kasserolle". He was very surprised that it wasn't a casserole, but a yummy dish served in a small, black cauldron.
In fact the word originates in France it's French for a type of cooking pot but in English and other languages has come to mean the dish cooked in a casserole as well as the pot itself. Other nations have adopted the word in various spellings.
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Old 10-02-2013, 05:28 PM   #32
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If you've ever been to a Lutheran Church supper, a funeral, family reunion, or a barnraising in MN, the woman prepare a variety of dishes and lay them out buffet style, arranging the cold dishes on one table (or two or three), the hot dishes on another table, and the desserts on a third table. I think the use of the word "hotdish" has its roots in that tradition--dishes that were placed with the other hot food on the hot dishes table. Although, there is also the distinction made re: ingredients. Potatoes, cream of mushroom soup (Lutheran binder), and ground beef are typical ingredients for hotdishes. Casseroles are fancier dishes with more expensive ingredients. At least, that seems to be how my family distinguished between a hotdish and a casserole.
Growing up in Wisconsin, "casserole" was the term we used for all dishes of this type. I had never heard of hotdish until I moved to Minnesota.

While I like to think my tastes have grown more sophisticated over time, there is still something comforting about a one dish meal. I still make them from time to time, but I've abandoned the cream-of-whatever soup and use scratch made "binder" sauces.

As for the goulash recipe in the original post, I've never seen anything like that. I realize there are many variations but, in my world, goulash must have tomatoes (either sauce or chopped) and paprika.

And corn? Nah, that just ain't right.
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Old 10-02-2013, 05:41 PM   #33
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I have only eaten Hungarian Goulash in Vienna. It was served with spaetzle and had chunks of beef in it, not ground beef. No beans. Here's a llnk that might be of interest:

All About Hungarian Goulash - Authentic Recipe

Andy, in MN we understand the differences between the words hot dish and casserole. Hot dishes are typically made with ground beef and cream soups and NOT served to company, but you can bring a hot dish to a potluck. A casserole is made with a more expensive cut of meat or another type of meat and can be served to company. There are recipes in MN for tuna hot dish and tuna casserole. I'll leave it up to DCers to figure out the difference.
Over here we have a hotpot (probably from the term "hotch-potch", meaning a lot of things thrown together). With the exception of Lancashire Hotpot which is a special dish made with lamb, potatoes, onions, carrots, etc., an ordinary hotpot can be made of anything you have in the house - ground beef, lamb, pork, etc., or cubed stewing steak or even the remains of the previous day's roasted joint, with usually potatoes, veg and gravy which can be left-over for another meal or freshly made. If the hotpot is made with canned corned beef it's called corned beef hash not hotpot and if made with mostly potatoes and veg with only a bit of meat it's called "tater 'ash" or potato hash.

From what's been said here your "hotdish" and our "hotpot" may well be cousins. When "condensed" soups (notably Campbells and Heinz) came n the market in the 1960s they always had a recipe on the label for what I think you'd call a "hotdish" and some of them were very good (mind you, some of them were horrid such as the "Spanish rice" which involved boiled rice and a tin of tomato soup all mushed together) and my mother used to experiment with them. My favourite concoction was chicken, broccoli, mayonnaise and mushroom soup which sounds weird but was very tasty.
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Old 10-02-2013, 05:54 PM   #34
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That sounds tasty to me, MC.
But I like to think that over the years my tastes have grown.
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Old 10-03-2013, 09:35 PM   #35
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That sounds tasty to me, MC.
But I like to think that over the years my tastes have grown.
Well, yes. I was only8 or 9 when the condensed soups hit our shores. I have much more sophisticated tastes now. Mind you I did find myself fancying a chip butty with mayonnaise at lunch time today. Chips as in fries (the big chunky crinkly ones ) and butty as in a sandwich (a couple of great "doorsteps" of buttered bread in this case.). However I was strong and didn't fall. I just sat next to the student who was scoffing it and sniffed the aroma of her chips - Mmmmm!
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Old 10-04-2013, 12:05 AM   #36
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That sounds about right. And lots of paprika, cooked right into everything from the start. I'm sure I have the recipe I used around somewhere. It was more like a stew without sauce/liquid and a heavy paprika flavor...:
Does this look like what you're talking about?

It's one of many saved recipes I have on "allrecipes.com". Maybe Just Maybe I'll get around to making it this winter.

If you want to try making it, the recipe is here: Hungarian Goulash I Recipe - Allrecipes.com
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Old 10-04-2013, 06:18 AM   #37
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Does this look like what you're talking about?

It's one of many saved recipes I have on "allrecipes.com". Maybe Just Maybe I'll get around to making it this winter.

If you want to try making it, the recipe is here: Hungarian Goulash I Recipe - Allrecipes.com
Why now that you mention it, it did look like that
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Old 10-04-2013, 07:12 AM   #38
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Does this look like what you're talking about?

It's one of many saved recipes I have on "allrecipes.com". Maybe Just Maybe I'll get around to making it this winter.

If you want to try making it, the recipe is here: Hungarian Goulash I Recipe - Allrecipes.com
This looks great, I'm going to give it a try!

I noticed that the recipe calls for 3 pounds of meat for 8 people.

I'm sad to report that in my world today that would serve 12 people.

I hate progress!
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Old 10-04-2013, 08:10 AM   #39
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What is different about Hungarian Paprika. Most goulash recipes call for that and what I have is just Paprika. Could I use that successfully? My mother use to put big chunks of potato in it to stretch the recipe and I think if I do that my husband will eat it.
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Old 10-04-2013, 08:38 AM   #40
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Hungarian paprika is said to be the best (by some folks). Any good quality paprika is what you need. The recipe I use calls for sweet and hot paprikas.
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