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Old 04-30-2013, 12:45 PM   #1
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Comments re: leavening agents?

Ok we have the 3 main leavning agents to chose from baking powder, baking soda , or yeast.

I have made a pizza both with yeast and without it using baking powder.
I have read an article on the pro's and con's of using baking powder over yeast.

Though I have to say I don't see anything better about the taste when using yeast over baking powder.

So I can't see a benefit of using yeast ever over baking soda and for what purpose?
Plus with yeast you have to worry about killing it with to much hot water and also waiting for it to rise/act before baking. (a lose lose situation )

Question 2
Is when would you uses baking soda over the other 2 and what purpose for using over the others

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Old 04-30-2013, 01:14 PM   #2
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Also for question 2 baking powder really = cream of tar + baking soda
cream of tar adds the acidic to the baking soda which what makes the baking soda turn into the baking powder products.

So the lowest constituents are baking soda , cream of tar , and yeast.

I just don't see the benefit of using all the different types over just converting all the recipes to just useing baking powder (or ratio's of baking soda + cream of tar ) and forget the rest.

I can't see the taste effecting to me in any significant way (we do have sugar and seasonings for the pickey eater that should over ride any undesirable effect of baking powder tasted)

Also is there any uses for cream of tar on its own for a cooking product. i.e not used with baking soda or baking powder or yeast just a main ingredient that must be used on its own in a certain dish.
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Old 04-30-2013, 01:15 PM   #3
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I prefer yeast raised dough for pizza, as the yeast does add a flavor of its own to the dough.

Contrary to popular belief, the elastic texture of the pizza dough comes from the develpment of the gluten in the flour, not which leaven you use. A dough leavened with baking powder, or baking soda plus an acid can be just as elastic as a yeast dough.

baking powder leavens by chemical action. When the alkali ingredient in the baking powder is wetted, it reacts with the acid in the baking powder and resleases CO2, which is trapped by the gluten, making the dough raise. With yeast raised dough, the yeast eats simple sugars from the flour and gives off CO2, again leavening the dough.

Baking soda is a part of baking powder, but is simply bicarbonate of soda. It will do nothing by itself, wet or dry. but when it is mated with an acid, such as citrus, or cream of tartar, or buttermilk, it reacts and emits CO2, and leavens the dough.

I find that baking powder and soda give the crust a more soda-cracker kind of flavor, while yeast gives the crust a bread flavor.

And too much hot water won't kill yeast. Water that's too hot will kill the yeast. The water can not be above 110' F. I don't use anything hotter than about 107' F., just to be on the safe side.

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Old 04-30-2013, 01:20 PM   #4
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I would think that folks who use yeast for breads, pizza dough, etc. would have switched by now if they got better results with something else.
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Old 04-30-2013, 01:35 PM   #5
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Do an experiment: make yeast rolls and baking-powder biscuits and see if you notice a difference in flavor.
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Old 04-30-2013, 01:36 PM   #6
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Quote:
And too much hot water won't kill yeast. Water that's too hot will kill the yeast
That's what I meant just said it wrong sorry.


Quote:
I would think that folks who use yeast for breads, pizza dough, etc. would have switched by now if they got better results with something else.
I not saying they haven't but interms of when I make anything. I always seem not to beable to tell the differents (or the difference is so insignificant to me that it doesn't matter)


Also
You can create baking powder from baking soda + cream of tar.
What I know is 2:1 ratio for cream of tar : baking soda.

But how much equivalent baking powder would a 2 tsp of cream of tar + 1 tsp of baking soda yield. Would it be 1 tsp of baking powder or more?


Or is it like I would mix a batch of 2:1 mixer together then pull out a tsp from that to give the equivalent of baking powder?

I also know that you uses a lot less baking soda to make equivalent baking powder.... so once I know how to do it I can safe my self having to buy baking powder or if I run out just uses baking soda with an acidic substance.

For the acidic substitance is cream of tar the best to uses or what other options do I have?
And is the general principle always 2:1 for the acidic substance chosen or is this just for cream of tar?
(i.e is this more of a general chemical reaction formula or just for that particular substance.)
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Old 04-30-2013, 02:03 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sam111 View Post
I not saying they haven't but interms of when I make anything. I always seem not to beable to tell the differents (or the difference is so insignificant to me that it doesn't matter)
:woot2: The difference is huge. I have no idea what baking skills or experience you have, but you will never get the flavor or texture of sourdough bread or yeast rolls with other leavening agents.
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Old 04-30-2013, 02:08 PM   #8
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Ok with few cases.

How about the baking soda + cream of tar question to make baking powder.
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Old 04-30-2013, 02:38 PM   #9
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Baking powder is a combination of baking soda, cream of tartar and a starch (drying agent). A 2:1 ratio of CoT to BS plus starch. If you make your own BP you have to know how much starch to add to the 2:1 mix to equal the strength of commercial BP. If I remember correctly, there is 1/4 tsp. of BS in a teaspoon of BP.

BTW, I don't think it's worth the effort. Commercial BP is cheap enough and eliminates the hassle of making your own.
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Old 04-30-2013, 02:49 PM   #10
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Calumet, Clabber Girl, and several other brands of baking powder offer superior leavening compared to the simple baking soda+cream of tartar+cornstarch mixture. When the latter mixture gets wet, it is activated, period. The brands I listed are called double-acting as they include those ingredients that activate with moisture, and another set of ingredients that don't start leavening until heat is also applied. This igves you more loft in your biscuits, quickbreads, cakes, etc.

As far as your cream of tartar question, it is an essential ingredient in meringues as well.

I much prefer double- baking powder to either plain baking powder, or baking soda and an acid. It has a more neutral flavor as well.

And as Andy said, sour doughs and yeast risen products in general, get a good part of their flavor from the yeast, and the acids produced by those yeast.

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