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Old 01-08-2012, 03:52 PM   #11
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I used to eat haluski growing up but I don't see it anymore unless I go home:
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Old 01-08-2012, 05:13 PM   #12
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i would think a meal cooked years ago would have gone bad by now, so there's no comparison...
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Old 01-08-2012, 05:17 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
i would think a meal cooked years ago would have gone bad by now, so there's no comparison...

Yeah, but some of the meals cooked today are bad too so they really are the same!
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Old 01-08-2012, 05:25 PM   #14
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lol, point taken.
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Old 01-08-2012, 05:42 PM   #15
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i would think a meal cooked years ago would have gone bad by now, so there's no comparison...
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Old 01-09-2012, 07:23 PM   #16
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Very, and I do mean VERY. My mom was ahead of her time in the nutrition department; we always had green vegs and salads (yeah, both), and starches were starches (in other words, she considered corn and peas to be starches, not in the same category as non-starchy vegs). Because we were military, Mom learned to cook from "war brides" and we lived overseas, so our diet had more ethnic foods than most in the 60s. Many of Mom's friends were Japanese, French, and German, and she adopted and adapted to varying sources of food and ways to use them over 26 years of moving hither and yon.

That said, now I can go to the grocery store and buy things like bags of baby mixed greens (any time of the year), two or three types of fresh mushrooms and a few dried. I can buy many kinds of pasta, both US and imported, in more shapes than Mom could have imagined. Even in a ten-year period, when I first moved to Galena (small midwestern town, pop 3000, 3 hours from Chicago, and I don't mean 3 hours of suburbs, I mean 3 hours of farms), I could only buy long grain generic rice, Uncle Ben's, Rice-a-Roni, and Minute Rice. Now I can buy, in the same store, Jasmine, Basmati, rice specifically for risotto, Mexican short grain rice, and more. This is a huge difference in a small town grocery store. I'm just using the rice as an example of how much the grocery availability in small-town midwest has changed in the past ten years. From my childhood, it is an amazing leap. And, as I've said, we were ahead of most people who didn't live in metropolitan, cosmopolitan areas.
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Old 01-09-2012, 09:48 PM   #17
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The next big change in mainstream grocery stores will be the increasing stocking of truly local products. My local chain has kind of an advertising advantage over stores in some other states. They have an ad series running touting their local producers. By local, they mean in-state. Texas, being so large and having such a range of environments, means a lot of what they're not bragging on is exactly where they were sourcing their stuff before and always have been. Grant you, they make some effort to stock good product, and that naturally tends to mean as local as possible. But they are also beginning to stock a very few truly local produce items. Heirloom tomatoes and such.

As small growing operations revive, I suspect they will be able to stock much more local produce. It would right now be a problem for them to try to do too much from within 50 miles of the stores. It takes a fairly large local grower to keep three or four large stores stocked with one item. But growers of that critical size are cropping up more and more. I fully expect smart grocers to install "Farmers Market" sections with local grower sources named in their produce departments, alongside the produce depot stuff. The way small local produce direct markets are proliferating and being patronized, the large groceries will want to bring those customers into the store.

I'm very optimistic, because there are both people thinking more about their food and people to supply them who appreciate the satisfactions of growing more than high salaries at the ends of commutes. With the rapid growth of interest in cooking, it feels like quite something special on the way that we've never seen before, the combination of global specialties and local raw material and consumers to do something with it. Not just individuals, either. Here's a great article about some things happening in South Carolina. Good place for it. They're home to a pretty good range of heirloom products and chefs who are determined to use them.

Southern Farmers Vanquish the Clichés

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/28/di....html?_r=1&hpw
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Old 01-09-2012, 10:18 PM   #18
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I agree that it is our biggest failure in our community. We have two grocery stores; a Piggly-Wiggly and a Wal-Mart. Drive for a half hour west and Dubuque has some more, but not really much different. Our little community does have a farmers' market, but it rarely has anything I don't grow in my (very small, very limited) garden.

Since the grocery stores are part of larger chains, there is almost no local produce available. Even when local stuff is great, it is hard to find it. I can "do" my own tomatoes and lettuce. But it seems strange to buy asparagus from some other country when I know it is grown locally (I can occasionally find a friend of a friend and buy some locally)and during the season. SOme years I can get morels, some not. But, in fact, our local farmers' market is more geared to those who do canning & preserves. Nothing wrong with that.

I definitely do NOT believe in ONLY buying "locally in-season". Nice fantasy, if you never want to eat lettuce, tomato, etc, in the winter above the frost line. But when it is good, and it is near-by, why can't it be in the local stores?

Now that I've been here ten years, I have a source for lots of this stuff, and I'm happy for it. But ten years?
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Old 01-15-2012, 07:35 AM   #19
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I read an article today that said cooking habits are changing as a result of changing lifestyles. It says that while there is an increase in people cooking from scratch that now normally includes combining both raw materials and pre-prepared ingredients? Would you agree?
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Old 01-15-2012, 09:29 AM   #20
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Quote:
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I definitely do NOT believe in ONLY buying "locally in-season". Nice fantasy, if you never want to eat lettuce, tomato, etc, in the winter above the frost line. But when it is good, and it is near-by, why can't it be in the local stores?
Multiple possible reasons. One is that a grocer needs a regular and reliable supply at a wholesale price. Local or afar doesn't change that. So, if they are to keep, for instance, local tomatoes in season as their primary tomato line, they need a supplies that can provide enough quantity, as often as needed. That means a competent grower, not an amateur who may or may not have a reliable crop. And it means that the local grower has to have a large enough and efficient enough operation to sell at grocer wholesale, not farmers market retail.

Another is that it takes more effort to buy locally. Standard produce is had from large wholesalers who supply most everything from everywhere with one point of contact. Local buying requires more calls and contacts to accomplish and more chances that something will happen, like the local guy gets sick, so no cucumbers that week. Grocers can't work like that. And the grower may well have to be able to present an invoice and wait for corporate to pay, just like any business grower.

Be clear. When we say "local produce," we don't mean the products of a bunch of backyard farmers or part-time country gardeners. We mean serious, professional local growers of substance and expertise. It's not just lack of stores selling local - it's lack of local farmers. It may be in season, but is there a large local grower of that vegetable so it can be had in commercial quantities in season?

My local chain is at least trying. They buy as locally as possible. I may be 200 miles away, but it's still in-state, and there's nothing closer. They also, to their everlasting credit, have small displays of things like heirloom tomatoes in season, grown locally, like within 20 miles of the store. I suspect they lose money on them from spoilage, but they're trying. So desire on the part of the sore has to be there, too. Since they're usually large corporate chains, it has to start in the corporate office with at least giving the produce managers authority to buy local goods when they can.

And stores are sensitive to customers. Ask the produce manager where things come from. Ask if they can't be had closer to home. If not, why not? Who at corporate decides? How many other customers can you get to ask the same questions? It's not produce, but a while back, my chain changes fresh tuna suppliers, and the result was a serious drop in quality. Enough people demanded answers that we're not back on the old supplier at the same good quality. It was strictly negative customer comment going back up the line through the seafood manager.
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