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Old 07-20-2015, 11:40 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Seems to me that gelato has less fat in it as well. It is also served at a warmer temperature so that it is not rock hard, and also creates the sensation of more intense flavor because it's easier to taste things that are warmer.

As an experiment, drink a glass of milk at 32.5 degrees, then a glass at 40 degrees. The warmer same milk tastes much richer at a warmer temperature.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
You're right. It does have a lower fat content. But it also has even less air than ice cream. It's the density and higher temp that make it soooo creamy and flavorful.
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Old 07-21-2015, 12:14 PM   #22
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You're right. It does have a lower fat content. But it also has even less air than ice cream. It's the density and higher temp that make it soooo creamy and flavorful.
We are in absolute agreement here. Silversage, you are truly a sage in frozen dairy products. Nice job, and thatnks for enahncing our knowledge on the subject. You are - .


Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 07-23-2015, 01:15 PM   #23
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Just a little heads up on home made ice cream - be careful of the temperature of the freezer that you put that bowl in over night. I recently purchased the Kitchen Aid ice cream attachment and tried to make vanilla ice cream.

First step: put the bowl into the freezer over night. Hmmm. Kitchen freezer on my refrigerator is full. Ah! Put it in the commercial chest freezer in the basement.

Bad move. This is a commercial freezer that maintains a temperature of -24 F ( I just measured it with an IR thermometer ). It has very thick insulation so it doesn't run all the time and can keep food frozen for a couple of days without power ( there are instructions for adding dry ice after this time ).

In any case, the liquid ice cream mixture froze solid instantly as I poured it into the mixer bowl. Luckily there's an escapement on the ice cream attachment so it didn't break either the attachment or the mixer itself. I guess the moral of the story is that colder isn't necessarily better when it comes to freezers.
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Old 07-23-2015, 01:23 PM   #24
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Yes, I've found the temp of the bowl is critical. I get it as close to 0 degrees F as possible.

Thanks again for the tips, looking forward to the vodka taste.

Here's the mint chocolate chip, by the way:



I just had some of the frozen stuff for my morning coffee break. Fifteen seconds in the microwave, chop it up a bit, add a little heavy whipping cream, and some sugar-free chocolate sauce, and it's amazing.
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Old 07-26-2015, 01:45 PM   #25
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Freezing homemade ice creal

The addition of a small amount of xantham gum, say between 1/4 and a 1/2 teaspoon will keep it from making ice crystals and becoming like an ice cube in you freezer. Adding some brown sugar to you custard might also help
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Old 08-18-2015, 07:43 PM   #26
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I added a tablespoon of vodka, but had the same result. Next, I'll try three tablespoons.

I'll also try the xantham gum.

This stuff tastes great however, and I can always defrost the left overs a little bit.

2 cups HWC
.75 cup erythritol
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon peppermint extract
1-1/2 drops green food coloring (optional)
2 squares of unsweetened chocolate

1 TBS vodka
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Old 08-18-2015, 10:07 PM   #27
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I made banana ice cream and it isn't too hard after sitting in the freezer for days.
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Old 08-25-2015, 11:21 AM   #28
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Lack of sugar is the problem.

Most of us are aware that combining salt with water lowers the freezing point of the water. This is why ice cream makers always tell you to add salt to the ice. But sugar also lowers the freezing point, just not as much.

The water in the cream will freeze to a solid at temperatures most of us maintain in our home freezers. But by adding the right amount of sugar, you lower the freezing point just enough to keep it from freezing completely solid at those same temperatures.
Awesome. There's always a bunch of leftover homemade ice cream and I hate to eat it because it is so icy and hard. This is great info.
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Old 08-26-2015, 05:08 AM   #29
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I have just started making ice cream at home and I'm still using the recipes in the instruction booklet. The following ingredients make ice cream that is no harder or softer, after storage in the freezer, than store bought ice cream.

1 1/2 cups whole milk
1 1/8 cups granulated sugar
3 cups heavy cream
1 1/2 tablespoons pure vanilla extract

I wonder if the use of sugar instead of Splenda makes a difference. They do have slightly different properties.
I bought some icecream thats soft even after the freezer.
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Old 08-26-2015, 01:34 PM   #30
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How many of you love ice cream? Wow, I could hear that enthusiastic Yes, all the way here in SSM. how many of you have made ice cream that has great texture, even after being frozen? Wait, everything's quiet. Well kids, let the Chief show you how it's done. I give you Maplenut Ice Cream. And let me just say that this stuff is amazing. Want the recipe? I thought so.
Pay attention, I'm only going to type this once.

Addie, quit throwing things at me. Remember, I live in the snow capital of the United States. Winter will be back. Now pay attention.

Ingredients:
2 1/2 cups heavy cream
1 1/2 cups whole milk (set aside a half cup to mix with egg yolks and sugar)
6 large egg yolks, just the yolks
3/4 cup grade b maple syrup (found wherever pure maple syrup can be purchased in bulk)
3 tbs. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1 packet Knox unflavored gelatin
1/2 tsp. butter flavoring
1 cup broken walnut, or pecan pieces.

Put the cream and the milk into a saucepan over medium heat. While it's heating, beat the egg yolks and sugar together. Add the Maple syrup to the milk/cream mixture and whisk together for thirty seconds of so. Let heat until it's about to start simmering. Add the salt and turn heat to its lowest setting.

Add the gelatine and stir until dissolved. Finally ladle a half cup of the milk and cream base into the egg yolk while stirring. This will temper you egg yolks. Turn the heat down again and whisk the yolk/sugar mixture into the pan. Now, add the butter flavor and stir it in. Keep stirring until the base starts to thicken. Tun off the heat and keep stirring. When the ice cream base coats a spoon, and you can run your finger down it without the base dripping, it's thick enough. Now, cool in an ice bath until at least room temperature cold.
Pour this lovely concoction into your ice cream maker and follow the machine's directions for making ice cream. My ice cream maker calls for 30 to forty minutes of churning to make the finished product.

Add the nut meats after the ice cream has been churning for 15 minutes. When done, place in a sealed container and put in the freezer for a day. Then enjoy.

Of course, if you use corn syrup instead of maple syrup, you can add cocoa powder for chocolate ice cream, cream cheese and vanilla, with macerated strawberries for strawberry cheesecake flavor, or add butter scotch, blueberries, peanut butter and chocolate chips, just plain vanilla, or whatever flavor you want. If you add nutmeg and vanilla, you get egg-nog flavored ice cream. You can make any flavor you heart desires, even corn, or mushroom (both of which, when I did them, came out wonderful, especially the mushroom (Must use candy cap mushrooms as they taste like maple)).

Be creative with you flavors. If you make some kind of mint flavored ice cream, don't invite me. I detest the flavor of mint. But if you enjoy it, more power to you.

And just so ya knows, this base gave me a very nice ice cream texture.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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