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Old 11-25-2011, 09:31 AM   #1
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Mold - Meat, Fish?

We now know a lot about molds that our parents and grandparents were not aware of - molds ARE dangerous - and cannot usually be handled by just spooning the top off jam - or cutting off the edge of bread.

But I still have not found any definitive info on uncooked meat and fish

The FDA page

Molds On Food: Are They Dangerous?


only mentions salted meats (and says they can be eaten after removing surface mold) - but does say to discard cooked meat.

---

But what about fresh meat and fish? We've seen pictures of horrible green and blue molds on meat hanging for aging. Presumably this is just hacked off and we are fed what lies beneath.

But what's the real dope on this? Is moldy meat and fish 'safe' when you cut off the green and blue and whatever color?

(Incidentally - I did succeed in getting straight info from Cornell Univ that maple syrup with mold on the surface means one should discard the ENTIRE lot!)

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Old 11-25-2011, 10:38 AM   #2
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My mother's rule of thumb was that with solid foods (e.g. cheese, cured meats, some veggies), you could simply cut off the moldy part and use it. I've always followed that advice and have never had a problem.
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Old 11-25-2011, 11:20 AM   #3
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Not bad advice as a general rule - but how solid is 'solid' - ? - therein lies one of the dilemmas.

But still - what about uncooked meat and fish - we know that the aged steaks we eat have been previously COVERED with VERY bad looking stuff - does anyone know anything about this?
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Old 11-25-2011, 03:56 PM   #4
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There are a couple of considerations. One is the density of the food. You can't remove mold from porous food. The root tendrils are deep in the food. So, obviously, bread and such is out. Without being a mold expert, the safe rule may be to discard food that has mold that isn't expected to be there. I mean, consider a cheese that supposed to be "moldy." You know what it's supposed to look like. But if one of those cheeses is growing fur, I figure it's been under pretty poor conditions, and I probably don't want it anyway. Ditto for raw steak. I expect a particular kind of mold on dry cured meat and sausage. Fish would be so repellent that it's not even mentioned in any of the information resources about food mold. I really don't want to mess with any fish that's been around long enough to grow mold. There's an exception to everything. Katsuobushi is Japanese tuna deliberately sprayed with fungus after it's dried and smoked. They just keep shaving off the mold until it gives up and quits growing. The fish ends up like wood and is used by shaving.
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Old 11-25-2011, 04:48 PM   #5
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For me aged beef is like the old saying about sausage, everybody likes it but nobody wants to see it being made. I would leave that process to a professional and pay the big bucks.

When I was a everybody in our family aged venison, rabbits and some gamebirds if it was cold outside and nobody became ill. I do not remember enough about it to feel comfortable trying it myself.

Other than that I use my own judgement and more or less follow the rules laid down by Steve's mom.
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Old 11-26-2011, 01:25 AM   #6
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I still would wonder about the health consequences (re mold) of aged beef having been originally COVERED with all that gunk. Raw meat is certainly not solid.

As for uncooked fish - I brought that up because a friend was going to give me some 'maustekala' that he made but found it covered with mold some days after preparation and gave it a toss. (Maustekala is a spice-marinated 'raw fish' )

If someone wants to experience ROTTEN raw fish - give a try of this Swedish delicacy - Surströmming -

Surströmming - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Old 11-26-2011, 01:51 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpe View Post
I still would wonder about the health consequences (re mold) of aged beef having been originally COVERED with all that gunk. Raw meat is certainly not solid.

As for uncooked fish - I brought that up because a friend was going to give me some 'maustekala' that he made but found it covered with mold some days after preparation and gave it a toss. (Maustekala is a spice-marinated 'raw fish' )

If someone wants to experience ROTTEN raw fish - give a try of this Swedish delicacy - Surströmming -

Surströmming - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

!!
Lol, even the can comes bloated, and my Grand mother adored them mixed with potato, sour cream and onion. Prepared not too unlike a blintz, but every year when she opened them, I, along with a majority of us "young" people, had to leave.

Certain molds/cultures, are an essential component to many foods we love.

A lot of people forget that modern refrigeration is still a new technology for a lot of the world. Also, certain exposure helps keep the immune system in check and our system able to handle things.

No food is "solid", some food may be more dense, but NO food is solid, period. Fresh should be eaten fresh. Unless the intent is to cure/dry age/preserve, than there are steps in place to support the amount of mold and the process it self. Moldy food has been around a LOT longer than food from a fridge. Mold plays an important role in food, always has, and always will. . .good or bad.

Curing and dry ageing, along with cheese making, are all done under a watchful eye, and is a process that is done with a lot of detail and time honored technique. I am not gonna pop open the fridge, grab a green steak and have at it, nor would I a grab a fuzzy grey mold covered baguette and go to town. . .and, dispute ethic heritage/world cuisine, spoiled seafood is just that, spoiled seafood. There is a reason your nose is where it is on your face, and that is to stop spoiled crap from entering your pie hole, lol.

Some meats can e trimmed. Cheese, for the most part, can be trimmed(unless it is ammonia like and a soft cheese), hell, even some breads can be cleaned up a wee bit. Seafood, I do NOT monkey with.
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Old 11-26-2011, 01:55 AM   #8
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I live six miles from Mold Flintshire, I visit on market days and have never caught anything.
I bought some green (freshly killed) dexter beef yesterday. It will hang in the cold room for 30+ days, I will only bring it home when the cut edges are blackish and mouldy.
When I made salami ect I dipped them in a liquid that promotes mould.
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Old 11-26-2011, 02:00 AM   #9
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I live six miles from Mold Flintshire, I visit on market days and have never caught anything.
I bought some green (freshly killed) dexter beef yesterday. It will hang in the cold room for 30+ days, I will only bring it home when the cut edges are blackish and mouldy.
When I made salami ect I dipped them in a liquid that promotes mould.

That is exactly the type of tradition, and time honored technique I am referring to. Particularly with Salum, the process would just not yield the same result if it were not for the helpful mold/bacteria. Same with proper hung beef. The enzymes all help breakdown thing and make a super steak, superb.

lol, I said proper hung beef.
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Old 11-26-2011, 02:16 AM   #10
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Tat I bet you know that one of the finest pudding wines can only be made after the grape has contracted botrytis cinerea the mould is so revered in France the call it Noble Rot.
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