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Old 09-21-2017, 09:24 PM   #11
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While this lime discussion is way off topic, I'll put my $0.02 worth in.

I bought a bag of Key Limes once to make a pie. I don't know where they were grown. I do know they were exponentially harder to squeeze, gave a lot less juice and had a much more sour taste than Persian limes. If they were fantastic, they'd be worth the extra cost and effort.

With apologies to Craig, the article GG linked expresses how I feel about the differences and the authenticity factor.
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Old 09-22-2017, 06:40 AM   #12
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My avatar pic and signature are just reminders to the new incarnation of Margi C.

So, Tenspeed have you used your new attachment yet?
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Old 09-22-2017, 10:26 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
While this lime discussion is way off topic, I'll put my $0.02 worth in.

I bought a bag of Key Limes once to make a pie. I don't know where they were grown. I do know they were exponentially harder to squeeze, gave a lot less juice and had a much more sour taste than Persian limes. If they were fantastic, they'd be worth the extra cost and effort.

With apologies to Craig, the article GG linked expresses how I feel about the differences and the authenticity factor.
They grow the Key limes in the Bahamas (only it would be spelled "cay" if they called them that down there), but they just call them limes. We knew several small growers and got large bags of limes cheap. Growing conditions in the Bahamas are very similar to the Keys, so it's reasonable to make the projection that the limes are also going to be quite alike.

It's true that they have a much lower juice yield than the Persian limes, and they are much harder to squeeze. I quickly gave up on hand squeezing them. The flavor though was outstanding, and although I never made a pie, I used them often when cooking fish, always had some on hand. They were also a necessary ingredient in the conch salad at our best friend's bar, and in the fresh mojitos they also served there.
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Old 09-22-2017, 11:11 AM   #14
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One of the local supermarkets is having chuck roasts / steaks on sale next week for $2.49 / lb., so it will be a good week to experiment. As best as I can figure out, well marbled chuck should work, and trim off connective tissue / hard gristle / excess fat. Cut into strips that will fit in the feed tube and freeze for 30 minutes or so.

Kenji recommends a second grind for half the meat, and I might do that, depending upon the temperature of the meat after the first grind. I'll be grinding a pound or so, so hopefully it will still be cold.

I've read that running a piece of bread or crumpled paper towels through the grinder makes clean up easier. As we rarely make it through a pack of buns before they get stale, I think running a bun through is the safer option, at least for starters.

I don't have any frame of reference for grinding meat, but I'm sure it will make a lot more sense after the first batch. Hopefully we won't have to call 1-800-dominos.

I won't be putting lime into the beer I will be drinking while grilling the burgers, so that part of the discussion isn't helping me.
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Old 09-22-2017, 04:27 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
One of the local supermarkets is having chuck roasts / steaks on sale next week for $2.49 / lb., so it will be a good week to experiment. As best as I can figure out, well marbled chuck should work, and trim off connective tissue / hard gristle / excess fat. Cut into strips that will fit in the feed tube and freeze for 30 minutes or so.

Kenji recommends a second grind for half the meat, and I might do that, depending upon the temperature of the meat after the first grind. I'll be grinding a pound or so, so hopefully it will still be cold.

I've read that running a piece of bread or crumpled paper towels through the grinder makes clean up easier. As we rarely make it through a pack of buns before they get stale, I think running a bun through is the safer option, at least for starters.

I don't have any frame of reference for grinding meat, but I'm sure it will make a lot more sense after the first batch. Hopefully we won't have to call 1-800-dominos.

I won't be putting lime into the beer I will be drinking while grilling the burgers, so that part of the discussion isn't helping me.
Part one: That is how I do it, and I get good results.

Part two: I run a piece or two of bread through at the end of my meat grind to push the last of the meat through. When the meat coming out begins to turn to bread, stop grinding. The rest of the bread will wash out easily.

BTW, after rinsing the major stuff off the grinder parts, they can go into the dishwasher. All the parts are top-rack dishwasher safe, and the dishwasher is good for killing off the nasties.

I've never ground key limes, so I can't help you with that.

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Old 09-23-2017, 12:41 AM   #16
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...I don't have any frame of reference for grinding meat, but I'm sure it will make a lot more sense after the first batch. Hopefully we won't have to call 1-800-dominos...
I've done my own ground meat a couple of times using my Mom's old 1950s Oster Kitchen Center. It has a grinding attachment. It turned out fine, the burgers were fine...and I'm basically too danged lazy to do it all the time. Since I didn't need to call out for a cardboard pizza, I trust you had nothing but a rousing success.
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