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Old 08-10-2005, 05:58 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
LemonSong - you don't have kids do you - *wink* (we lost our winking emoticon) - it is easier said than done. Especially if it's going to create WWIII every mealtime.


But remember..............and this too shall pass............

It really will.
Nope, no kids yet, but when I do have them I'm certainly not going to put up with this kind of negative behavior. Nor will I allow my kids to lead an unhealthy lifestyle. If that means causing "WWIII" every mealtime, then thats what it means.
My mom let me get away with this type of "picky eater" behavior and I really wish she'd have laid down the law. It never helped me until I grew out of it, so I agree that "this too shall pass" but in the mean time it left me unhealthy, overweight, and allowed me to walk all over her in other things that didn't help me (like housework, etc.).
Parents today are afraid of their kids. They're afraid they'll cause "WWIII" and I don't think that thats going to help any situation. You're the parent, she's the child, lay down the law.
If its a topic where she has a legitimate point, then thats one thing...but she doesn't have any legitimate point here. She wants to live an unhealthy lifestyle that annoys you/bothers you/stresses you out so much you have to post on this message board about what you can do to cater to her negative behavior...why fall in to that trap?
Certainly I mean no offense whatsoever, and to some degree I think you should allow her to express herself and eat what she wants...but not all the time! When she's out on her own, if she wants to be super-picky and eat crap, then that is her own issue, however while she's under your roof she follows your rules! Its never too late to help your family to lead a more healthy lifestyle!
I wouldn't recommend doing the "eat everything on your plate before you get up" thing, but like I said..make a meal, if she doesn't want it, don't cater to her bad behavior by giving in and making special meals for her.
If she wants to spend her money buying something she'd like to eat, fine. If she likes what you make or eats part of it, fine. If she makes her own meal and cleans up the mess, thats fine too. Otherwise, this is HER problem not yours, don't make it yours.
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Old 08-10-2005, 06:09 PM   #22
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Paint, I looked over your list, and I think your daughter can live just fine off those foods. Don't worry about it too much. If you make a big thing of it, it will just make matters worse.
She'll grow out of it.

In regard to pizza, I think it has an undeserved bad reputation. You can cut down on the fat content by making your own...(or letting her do it). Buy the refrigerated canned pizza crusts, have her nuke the pepperoni on paper towels to get out a lot of the grease, and let her go at it. All she needs to do is smear a little sauce on the crust, put on the mozzerella and pepperoni and anything else she wants, and bake.
It will be no big deal for her to boil a little pasta, (my grandaughter likes bowties), and toss with some butter and cheese of her choice. Not a big step to add some tuna and peas, if she'll go for it.
Have you showed her how to make a bird's nest of her mashed potatoes? Just make a little indentation in the center and put the peas in there like little eggs. I still like that myself.

About meat...most of us eat way too much anyway.
Is there any kind of breakfast cereal that she likes? A lot of them are fortified with iron, as are some breads and other grain items.
I'd also recommend you check with her doctor, and have him recommend an appropriate vitamin for teenage girl. It doesn't have to be a horse pill to work.
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Old 08-10-2005, 06:14 PM   #23
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Thanks everyone!! Kitchenelf - you are right, I do have to look at the bigger picture. It is easy to just focus on the bad things she eats and forget about the good stuff. She does have a healthy breakfast (she likes organic 'weetabix' which is very healthy), and I am managing to send her to school with fairly healthy lunches (sandwiches on wholewheat bread, yogurt, fruit, low-fat chips etc.). I guess I am focussing on dinner because that is the main meal of the day.

Alix - I was not offended at all by your advice! She always has liked to be the centre of attention. DH has never liked the idea of family mealtimes - he would much prefer that I fed the kids before he gets home from work and then just us two eat in the dining room later. However, I do believe that eating together as a family is very important - it at least gives the kids a chance to see what we are eating and to try some if they want to.

I'm going to search out recipes for some of her favourite things (cream of tomato soup, pizza, macaroni and cheese) and have a look to see how heart-healthy I can make them. I should be able to make them in bulk and freeze portions for her....and maybe try and get her interested in helping to cook them too.

I'm not worried about calories. She is naturally skinny...we all are. It's heart-health I'm mostly concerned about. She prefers diet soda - but is only allowed soda at the weekends (I buy the kids a 2-litre bottle of soda each on a Friday).

I've tried pureeing veggies and hiding them in things, but she can tell the difference in taste. I think I will just have to keep nagging at her to take her vitamins for now!

I had some good news today...as I mentioned before, both my Mother and Father have high cholesterol and heart disease. My Father has had 4 strokes and 3 heart attacks and ended up having triple bypass surgery. I have always tried to eat a low-fat healthy diet because of this, but I was still concerned because it's mostly genetic. Anyway, I went for a cholesterol check on Monday and got the results today - I am in excellent health with very low risk of heart disease. Both my 'bad' cholesterol and my triglyceride levels are only half of what would be considered 'normal' and I have great 'good' cholesterol levels. It means that I am doing a good job cooking dinners that are heart-healthy....I just need to try and adjust DD's dinners to make them healthier too....if I managed to do it with the food we eat, then I can do it with the food she eats. It just takes some thinking about.

Thanks again,
Paint.
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Old 08-10-2005, 06:19 PM   #24
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Too many posts to read here, but since your teen is able to decide what she likes, let her. My 14 year old knows how to cook, makes her own things, much the same as your daughter. Heart disease runs in my family too, but kids their age dont care about that. My girl loves bread, pasta, rice, mac and cheese, veggies (limited to corn, and broccoli), all the things your girl likes too. The only advice I have is to bake things instead of frying, and steam veggies.
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Old 08-10-2005, 07:11 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paint
I'm not worried about calories. She is naturally skinny...we all are. It's heart-health I'm mostly concerned about. She prefers diet soda - but is only allowed soda at the weekends (I buy the kids a 2-litre bottle of soda each on a Friday).
Heart health (as you probably know) has nothing to do with being "naturally skinny". The same is true of health in general. Weight and size aren't issues at all! Her metabolism will slow down eventually and the bad habits will remain...this happens to many people and accounts for heart disease and other obesity risks being at an even higher risk later on in life.

If you're concerned about heart-health here are somethings you can do:
1- Limit sugar intake and add more fiber! (sounds like you're doing a good job w/ wheatbix and such, but take it even further...why allow any pop at all if you have success during the week not allowing it?)
2- make sure she does a cardio workout everyday!!! (and if you can get her to lift weights, thats even better!)
3- Fats are fine, just make sure they aren't transfats and limit saturated fats. Good fats come from things like salmon and nuts. See if she'll eat almonds instead of low-fat chips.
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Old 08-10-2005, 07:36 PM   #26
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I was, and still am I guess, a single parent. Two boys, 13 years apart. The younger is now 23. The older one was the picky eater. He showed up on my doorstep when his mother couldn't deal with him any more, at the age of 15. She fed him a steady diet of Swanson pot pies and TV dinners, and , maybe, a Banquet entre on Sunday. When he came to live with me, he would only eat beef, pork, and maybe some veal. Hoit dogs and hamburgers were, of course, a major delight. No lamb, no organ meats, and heaven forbid, no fish or seafood. The only vegetables he would eat were corn, frozen, not canned, and green beans, canned, never frozen. I am really not sure if his mother ever prepared a fresh vegetable, or if she knew how.

The younger one I had on my own since he was nine months old. The only things he ever refused, and still does to this day, are flan (egg custard) and sweet potatoes.

I made sure they had something nourishing for breakfast every day, packed each of them a lunch all through school and into their first jobs, and I prepared a hot meal almost every night of the week. They always had two choices: Take it, or leave it! They are both still alive, and healthy.
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Old 08-10-2005, 08:17 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caine
I made sure they had something nourishing for breakfast every day, packed each of them a lunch all through school and into their first jobs, and I prepared a hot meal almost every night of the week. They always had two choices: Take it, or leave it! They are both still alive, and healthy.
Hope that didn't cause WWIII !!! Glad to hear they're both alive and healthy ;)
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Old 08-10-2005, 08:23 PM   #28
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i'm picky too. but nowhere near as bad lol.
caine it sounds to me like your kids were way better off
with you. you're getting some karma from me.
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Old 08-10-2005, 08:51 PM   #29
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OK, Paint, it sounds like you got some good advice here, and YAY to your good news about your cholesterol. I am sorry I didn't get a chance to post my other picky kid recipes, but I will get there I promise. I am glad you are feeling a bit better about the overall picture, thats what we are here for, to support each other! I completely agree with you about the sit down dinner too. Good for you for insisting upon it. Your husband may grump about it now, but your kids will talk about it when they are grown and he will realize it was important.

LemonSong, you make me laugh very hard. Please don't take this the wrong way but I have a feeling you have WWIII coming your way when you do have kids. From your posts you sound pretty um...opinionated and steadfast in your beliefs, I suspect any child of yours will inherit this trait. So don't be surprised if your words come back to haunt you. I don't know of any parent who doesn't have one of those "MY kids will never..." moments. Never say never. LOL.

Caine, kudos to you for exposing your kids to so many good things. It aint easy when you are single to do that.

Constance, you are absolutely right about pizza having a bad rep. It can be very very healthy, or very very bad. Just depends on how you make it. That is one reason I suggest either tortillas or pitas as a base for kids. The less processed stuff, the better.
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Old 08-10-2005, 09:06 PM   #30
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LemonSong will have a baby girl - that baby girl will wrap him so tight around her little finger - his heart will melt, he'll be the proudest man - and he'll know not to ever come back to DC and tell us he caved at dinnertime
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