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Old 04-29-2014, 11:16 AM   #11
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I had to look up airing cupboard and found this helpful site: The Best of British - Around the House

I think most Americans would call that a utility closet. I put rising bread in the microwave after heating a cup of water in it.
I just leave the dough in the mixer bowl on the counter to rise. Works fine.
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Old 04-29-2014, 01:05 PM   #12
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I just leave the dough in the mixer bowl on the counter to rise. Works fine.
I don't bake a lot, but I thought dough is supposed to rise in a warm place. In my kitchen, dough in the metal mixer bowl wouldn't be warm.
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Old 04-29-2014, 01:15 PM   #13
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I don't bake a lot, but I thought dough is supposed to rise in a warm place. In my kitchen, dough in the metal mixer bowl wouldn't be warm.
As long as it's in a draft-free location, at room temperature it will rise fine. If anything, it may take a little longer to double in size vs. a warmer location.

Some bread and pizza dough recipes recommend putting kneaded dough in the fridge to rise overnight as slower rising develops a better flavor.
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Old 05-01-2014, 01:45 AM   #14
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I just leave the dough in the mixer bowl on the counter to rise. Works fine.
It would take two days in our kitchen during the winter. Until nighttime when we sit and watch TV, we keep the thermostat at 66. Add in a leaky window frame or outlet and the temp around the counter is around 60. I've actually considered using my old doughboy end table for proofing bread.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:56 AM   #15
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It would take two days in our kitchen during the winter. Until nighttime when we sit and watch TV, we keep the thermostat at 66. Add in a leaky window frame or outlet and the temp around the counter is around 60. I've actually considered using my old doughboy end table for proofing bread.

We keep our house at 65ļF all winter.
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Old 05-01-2014, 11:16 AM   #16
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It would take two days in our kitchen during the winter. Until nighttime when we sit and watch TV, we keep the thermostat at 66. Add in a leaky window frame or outlet and the temp around the counter is around 60. I've actually considered using my old doughboy end table for proofing bread.
If you feel the need for a proof box put the bowl of dough under a cardboard box or a plastic tote. If you want to add a little heat put an incandescent light bulb on a lead cord under the box to provide heat.

I use Andy's method, I let the dough take its time and rise at room temperature, no problems so far.

These days the dough and I move at about the same speed, I don't dare use that rapid rise stuff!
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Old 05-01-2014, 07:54 PM   #17
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I just leave the dough in the mixer bowl on the counter to rise. Works fine.
My kitchen is unheated unless the cooker is in use so in the airing cupboard or by the dining room radiator are my best bet. In winter the kitchen is so cold that in very cold weather (for here) a 3lb frozen chicken once took nearly 2 days to thaw and on one famously extra cold winter when I was a girl, we had to break the ice on the cat's water one morning!

I wouldn't use the m/wave because I find a quick rise makes a mediocre bread. Gentle heat is the way to go.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:42 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
As long as it's in a draft-free location, at room temperature it will rise fine. If anything, it may take a little longer to double in size vs. a warmer location.

Some bread and pizza dough recipes recommend putting kneaded dough in the fridge to rise overnight as slower rising develops a better flavor.
I think the longer it takes to rise, the better the end product. Sometimes I would make the dough at night, then leave it on the counter to rise or in the fridge. Bake it the next day. For the same day baking, I would put it in the oven with the light on. That provided enough heat to help it rise.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:46 PM   #19
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If you feel the need for a proof box put the bowl of dough under a cardboard box or a plastic tote. If you want to add a little heat put an incandescent light bulb on a lead cord under the box to provide heat.

I use Andy's method, I let the dough take its time and rise at room temperature, no problems so far.

These days the dough and I move at about the same speed, I don't dare use that rapid rise stuff!
I hate rapid rise yeast. It doesn't like me either. Maybe it is just that I hate change. I need to see the proofing in a cup with warm water.
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Old 05-03-2014, 04:45 PM   #20
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I don't bake a lot, but I thought dough is supposed to rise in a warm place. In my kitchen, dough in the metal mixer bowl wouldn't be warm.
It depends on the ambient temp of the room. My old kitchen was very warm but the kitchen in this house is like a 'fridge in winter unless the boiler is on 24/7 or the oven(s) are belting out hence my sometime use of the airing cupboard which has a gentle warmth from the hot water cylinder

Up to a point, the warmer the ambient temp the faster the dough will rise but too warm and it'll kill the yeast which is why you have to be very careful if using the oven or microwave. Again, up to a point the longer the rising time the better the flavour, as Addie says. One of the reasons "factory" bread is so bland and pappy is that it is not allowed time to develop. I assume that US bread factories use something similar to the "Chorleywood Process" that's used here.

This has some interesting observations about "factory" bread in Britain.
Does sliced bread make you feel bloated? - Telegraph
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