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Old 08-16-2011, 11:32 AM   #21
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sorry if I rained on your parade, but I'm not so sure
>> Foods that are high in sulfur tend to be low in acid...
is a good generalization

for example - sulfur is abundant in (most) onion; onion is acidic

most authorities cit garlic as a low acid vegetable.

there's more to it than "sulfur content"
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Old 08-16-2011, 12:27 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
sorry if I rained on your parade, but I'm not so sure
>> Foods that are high in sulfur tend to be low in acid...
is a good generalization

for example - sulfur is abundant in (most) onion; onion is acidic

most authorities cit garlic as a low acid vegetable.


there's more to it than "sulfur content"
Why should it be made into an issue though? With modern canning processes Botulism has become extremely rare. Even with homemade canned goods the chances of getting Botulism are very slim. Most reported cases of Botulism are in infants and one could just as easily get it from eating something when you dine out.
If one wanted to avoid every germ and possible cause of illness you would have to live in a bubble and get fed through a tube. Might as well stop living then.
Not trying to act like I know any more than either of you, just saying life is too short to worry about everything and turn everything into an argument.
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Old 08-16-2011, 10:05 PM   #23
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I think this conversation got a little derailed, but who am I to say --

My opinion is to just use that garlic. Make an absolutely insane amount of spaghetti sauce or something. Just freeze some giant paint cans of it or something. As far as I'm concerned you're currently dealing with the best problem in the world.
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Old 08-17-2011, 07:40 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
sorry if I rained on your parade, but I'm not so sure
>> Foods that are high in sulfur tend to be low in acid...
is a good generalization

for example - sulfur is abundant in (most) onion; onion is acidic

most authorities cit garlic as a low acid vegetable.

there's more to it than "sulfur content"
No, onion is not is acidic. When I am referring to "low acid" and "high acid", it is in regards to the canning rule of thumb of a pH greater or less than 4.6, which is that important number to know and the basis for the USDA guidelines of pressure or water bath canning. I'm not talking about base vs. acid using 7 as neutral. That's for chemistry... and while canning involves chemistry, it has its own set of rules revolving around that magic number of 4.6.

Of course sulfur content is not the only indicator. My intention was to say that as a rule of thumb, if something has high sulfur content, you should assume that it is a "low acid" (by canning terms) item that has to be pressure canned and that some items are so low acid that they cannot be preserved by canning without destroying the integrity of the food. I did not infer that there was a reliable positive correlation between sulfur content and pH.

I've been canning for more than 20 years and while I am not having a parade on which you may or may not "rain", I was just saying that I don't need to be "schooled" about it canning.

I didn't mean for this discussion to turn this direction. I was just wondering about roasting and freezing and if there was anything else to think about in regards to extending the life of this lovely bulb. Canning isn't an option, as I "play by the canning rules" so I thought there may be another way to preserve it through dehydrating or another method of freezing. Thanks all.
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Old 08-17-2011, 07:48 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by Snip 13 View Post
Why should it be made into an issue though? With modern canning processes Botulism has become extremely rare. Even with homemade canned goods the chances of getting Botulism are very slim. Most reported cases of Botulism are in infants and one could just as easily get it from eating something when you dine out.
If one wanted to avoid every germ and possible cause of illness you would have to live in a bubble and get fed through a tube. Might as well stop living then.
Not trying to act like I know any more than either of you, just saying life is too short to worry about everything and turn everything into an argument.
It's not about avoiding a germ (or bacteria in this case). It's about avoiding an unsafe practice. It's like not using your seat belt. 99% of the time it wouldn't matter because you're probably not going to be in an accident. But why tempt fate? It's really not difficult to just buckle up and avoid serious injury, just in case.

My mother and niece almost died from botulism, so I know it does happen. I'm not going to take the chance again. It's really not difficult to just not can garlic and preserve it another way, just in case.
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Old 08-17-2011, 09:13 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by velochic View Post
It's not about avoiding a germ (or bacteria in this case). It's about avoiding an unsafe practice. It's like not using your seat belt. 99% of the time it wouldn't matter because you're probably not going to be in an accident. But why tempt fate? It's really not difficult to just buckle up and avoid serious injury, just in case.

My mother and niece almost died from botulism, so I know it does happen. I'm not going to take the chance again. It's really not difficult to just not can garlic and preserve it another way, just in case.
I can understand your fear since you had love ones become seriously ill because of Botulism. When the right procedures are followed when canning it is as safe as any other food. Just saying that this is getting a bit out of control, why should members argue over things like this when there's no need to.
I nearly lost my brother when his kidneys failed from drinking to much so now I can't stand drunks and people that abuse alcohol.
You have other options like drying, processing and freezing if canning is not the way you want to go.
I hate arguing too which is why I said something in the first place. I've seen it destroy friendships, families and my own family at that.
Everyone has there own opinion and you have every right to yours.
My intention was not to upset anyone and if I did I'm truly sorry. I just meant to say that there are many opinions on the matter so why argue?
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Old 08-17-2011, 12:29 PM   #27
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We harvested our Garlic (300+ bulbs) in July 2010--kept it in an open box lined with cloth in the basement, cool consistent temperatures, good air flow.

Then this year when the Garlic (1000+ bulbs) was to be harvested in July 2011, I took the box of last year's garlic, peeled it and ground it up with oil and froze it in flat zip lock bags for use.

This year's garlic has just finished curing/drying. Again, I'll keep it in the basement open to the air and next summer before the next crop is due, I'll clean it and grind it up and freeze it again.

If you have old garlic (from last year), peel it (boil in water for 1 minute to remove skins) then pickle it in vinegar/salt/spices in the refrigerator, or dehydrate it (once chopped, and outside), or clean it and freeze it.

Softneck garlic should last 8-10 months in a cool environment (not the refrigerator) or hardneck garlic will last 4-6 months, again, in a cool environment. That's what I do.

Although I prefer chopped fresh garlic--it's really nice to have some ground up in the food processor and frozen--so it doesn't mess up the breadboard where I chop.

Nobody wants to talk about safety issues, but, it is important to be safe with all your foods, not just garlic. If you want good advice, go to university extension service documents on safe ways to keep garlic, you'll get tested good advice there. In addition to all the smart people on DC that have advice. Best wishes.
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Old 08-17-2011, 01:06 PM   #28
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How about pickling whole peeled garlic cloves? They stay crispy and are absolutely delicious to eat. You can also cooked with them although they have an acid bite.

Sliced picked garlic is wonderful on some cream cheese and crackers, good on relish plate - amazing dice as a condiment for hot dogs.

You can safely process can pickled garlic.
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Old 08-18-2011, 05:15 PM   #29
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You lucky people having to much garlic, i nearly bought a string of garlic the other day and decided against it at the cost. I love roast garlic so that's probably what i would do with it.Would also make a huge amount of garlic oil.
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Old 08-18-2011, 05:19 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Fabiabi View Post
You lucky people having to much garlic, i nearly bought a string of garlic the other day and decided against it at the cost. I love roast garlic so that's probably what i would do with it.Would also make a huge amount of garlic oil.
You might want to scroll up a bit and learn about the danger of garlic in oil, especially huge amounts.
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