"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Vegetables
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-21-2008, 09:24 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 7
Question Rapini (broccoli rabe)

Hi all,
I just bought a bunch of this stuff. I've never used it, but it looked intriguing and healthy. Any ideas for preparation? All I'm finding is to boil it, then sauté it in olive oil with garlic, etc. Does anyone have an out-of-this-world recipe to share?

__________________

__________________
madamejames is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2008, 09:36 PM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
It is a bitter green and benefits from a boiling salt water blanche and then a shock in ice water to set the green color. Traditionally sauteed with garlic and olive oil and also chili flakes and Italian sausage. Sometimes served as such with pasta and some grated cheese. Its flavor retains just a hint of bitterness and a really great nutty broccoli flavor without the boredom of modern broccoli. I think it is awesome stuff! good in soups and stews too.
__________________

__________________
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2008, 09:44 PM   #3
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 7
Smile Rapini

Thanks Robo410. It sounds good. Especially the pasta and grated cheese idea. I have some wonderful Comté cheese that I bet will be GREAT with it. (No pun intended, sorry!)
__________________
madamejames is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2008, 09:48 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
This is the first I have heard of this stuff, what exactly is it and is it readily available at the local fruit and veggie mart? I have some familiarity with greens but not much, my wife has just recently gotten into soul food and taken off with the greens.
Thanks!
__________________
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2008, 10:02 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Illinois/USA
Posts: 1,343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410 View Post
It is a bitter green and benefits from a boiling salt water blanche and then a shock in ice water to set the green color. Traditionally sauteed with garlic and olive oil and also chili flakes and Italian sausage. Sometimes served as such with pasta and some grated cheese. Its flavor retains just a hint of bitterness and a really great nutty broccoli flavor without the boredom of modern broccoli. I think it is awesome stuff! good in soups and stews too.
When do you add it to soups & stews? Most peppers will become bitter the longer they cook. I generally add broccoli to soups like cheddar just before serving. (I peel, chop and steam the stems till tender and use them to round out some soups that don't have much texture.)
__________________
"I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work." --- Thomas Edison
StirBlue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2008, 10:06 PM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Aera's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 140
I have used this with pasta dishes. It does get boiled. Its been a while but I believe it was for a very short time. After I boil it I remove it from water and strain, then in the same boiling water that is now tinted somewhat green, I would boil the pasta. When pasta was done I would mix pasta and rabe together along with some olive oil, crushed garlic, fresh grated parmesan cheese, sundried tomatoes and sliced kalamata olives. I thought it was pretty tasty, and you can just about put any ingredients that you like or any favorite pesto you may have.
__________________
Aera is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2008, 12:00 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Ahhh - one of my all-time favorite vegetables, & one that I grow several Italian varieties of every year in my garden. In fact, at this moment I have a nice big crisp bunch of it I picked up at the market the other day. It needs more of a "blanch" then a "boil". Just trim the ends, slice the rest into 1"-2" pieces & add to boiling water for 2-3 minutes, depending on the thickness of the stems. Sometimes I'll add the stem pieces for the 1st two minutes, & then add the more leafy pieces & the florets for the last minute. Drain & then proceed with your recipe.

Here's my own favorite recipe for using it:

BROCCOLI RAAB (aka Rapini) WITH PASTA & SAUSAGE (or shrimp)

One bunch broccoli raab, trimmed of tough stalks & roughly chopped
One box Farfalle (bowtie) pasta
One package hot Italian turkey sausage, sliced into bite-size pieces -or- one pound shrimp, shelled
3-4 cloves of garlic, peeled & roughly chopped
Extra-virgin olive oil
Crushed red pepper flakes & salt to taste
Grated parmesan cheese to taste (optional)

Bring large pot of water to a boil & add broccoli raab. Blanch for 2-3 minutes & remove with a slotted spoon or spider to a bowl & set aside. Add pasta to same water & cook according to package directions (al dente stage). Pour into colander to drain.

In a large skillet, heat a few dollops of olive oil & saute sausage slices (or shrimp) until just cooked thru. Add chopped garlic, stir a few times, then add in broccoli raab, crushed red pepper flakes, & salt to taste. Add in pasta & stir gently until combined & just heated thru. (If skillet isn't large enough to hold all the pasta, then use pasta cooking pot for final combining.) Serve with grated parmesan.

And here's another really good one we've enjoyed from Eating Well magazine:

Broccoli Rabe, White Bean & Fontina Pasta - Eating Well

And for even more ideas, check out the "Andy Boy" site. They provide pretty much all the broccoli raab in the markets here in Virginia:

Andy Boy: Products: Broccoli Rabe News

Enjoy!!
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2008, 05:11 PM   #8
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 7
Thanks Aera and BreezyCooking. Trying it tonight as I'm snowed in and want to serve a nice warm supper.
__________________
madamejames is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2008, 05:42 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
And not to ignore Maverick's question!!

Broccoli Raab - aka Rapini - is, in a way, a separate form of "sprouting broccoli", in that it doesn't form a large head, but little shoots, & in that the flavor is more intense. Also, the leaves & stems are a full part of the vegetable, unlike regular broccoli (although regular broccoli stems & leaves are edible too). It's a slightly bitter - but not severely so - vegetable.

Easy to grow in spring & fall (like other brassicas it likes cool weather & is best grown as a cool-weather "green"), it's a terrific & nutritious vegetable (although kids may not like it - lol). Check out the Andy Boy site I linked above for more info.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2008, 05:46 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
Thanks so much!
I copied the recipe as well, and after skimming it just need to pick some up and replenish my stock of EVOO, I have everything else. When we go to the store in the next couple of days to replenish our salad stock we will pick some up and give it a try.
__________________

__________________
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.