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Old 09-12-2012, 05:33 AM   #1
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Bucatini with tomato, pancetta and vegetables, “Marchigiana” style

Hi friends, I found this fine recipe in one of my cookbooks, La pasta delle nonne (Grandmothers’ pasta). It’s basically one of the 375 billions variations of an Italian tomato+vegs+cured pork pasta sauce. It comes from the Marche region, a beautiful and small region in central Italy, on the Adriatic sea.
So, this morning I’ll go out for some basic shopping and I’ll have it for dinner. It looks like a good recipe, with good sound ingredients, easy to make. More comfy than showy, IMO. We’ll see.

Now let’s take a look at the recipe.

Ingredients serving 4
150 g pancetta coppata, diced (substitute with pancetta, or prosciutto crudo, but not with other cold cuts, or you would change too much the intended flavor and texture)
1 onion, medium size
1 small carrot
1 celery stick
3 tablespoons EVOO
1 glass red wine
450 g canned chopped peeled tomatoes (not a runny bottled tomato sauce, because we need some texture here)
Fine grounded salt and black pepper
2 tablespoons coarse salt
450 g bucatini (or other long shaped pasta, like spaghetti, trenette, etc.)
1 cup grated pecorino cheese (or parmigiano reggiano)

How to make Bucatini alla Marchigiana
1-- Prepare the vegs: finely chop together onion, carrot and celery. Dice the pancetta: you don’t need too large meat cubes, I cut them about 1/2 cm.
Warm EVOO in a saucepan on medium heat, add the pancetta and sautée for about 3/5 minutes. You don’t want to cook it for too long, because it will cook again in the tomato sauce, and you want to transfer its “porky” flavor to the sauce. Add and sautée the minced vegs, stirring with a wooden spoon about 4 minutes. Pour in the glass of red wine and let it dry.
2-- In the meantime, bring a large pot of water (about 4 or 5 l water) to a rolling boil, then add about 2 tablespoons of coarse salt.
3-- Add the chopped tomatoes to the saucepan, stir well, cook about 5 minutes, taste it and add grounded salt and black pepper. Cook about 15 minutes on low/medium heat, and check it again before the end to see if it’s savory enough for you.
4-- Add the pasta to the boiling water, stir it and cook it for the time printed on the label. Drain your pasta, put it in the saucepan on high heat and mix it with the sauce very quickly, because you don’t wont to overcook it.
Transfer your pasta in a large bowl, stir well, add grated cheese, stir again and serve at once.

Buon appetito!

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Old 09-12-2012, 05:44 AM   #2
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Luca--I have everything to try this as well--but, do you saute the "trinity" (carrot, onion, celery) first and then add it or ?
I'm tempted to add some sauteed eggplant--have eggplant. I am also tempted to add some artichoke (in my case, those would be canned) and a smidgen of anchovie paste. Oh-oh--I'm on my way to making a new dish....

I'm thinking it would be nice garnished with some diced olives and capers as well as the grated cheese and chopped Italian parsley or fresh basil.

I will not be making it with "commercial" tomatoes--at this time of year, I have tomatoes up my ying-yang.

Maybe this weekend.
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Old 09-12-2012, 05:55 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Luca--I have everything to try this as well--but, do you saute the "trinity" (carrot, onion, celery) first and then add it or ?
I'm tempted to add some sauteed eggplant--have eggplant.

I'm thinking it would be nice garnished with some diced olives and capers as well as the grated cheese and chopped Italian parsley or fresh basil.

I will not be making it with "commercial" tomatoes--at this time of year, I have tomatoes up my ying-yang.
Hi CWS4322, when I use pancetta or things like that, I usually first sauté the meat, then add the soffritto trinity to the pan and go on sautéing the mix. That way, the vegs cook in the fat melting out from the meat, if any.
Don't know about eggplants, I like them only fried and/or battered!
And if you have your own sauce made with your ripe and flavorsome tomato, obviously you can greatly increase the overall fragrance of the sauce.
About garnishing, I'm somewhat a brute I'm always afraid to add garnishing which could interfere with the flavor of a recipe; for example, I like basil, but I would not add basil leaves to this dish. And I hate adding chopped parsley

Ciao
Luca
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Old 09-12-2012, 08:07 AM   #4
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Luca, that sounds wonderful! Gives me an excuse to buy pancetta!
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Old 09-12-2012, 08:13 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Luca, that sounds wonderful! Gives me an excuse to buy pancetta!


In my larder you'll always find, even in hard times, garlic, onions, celery, olive oil, pancetta, pasta, peperoncino and tomatoes!
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Old 09-12-2012, 08:18 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Luca Lazzari View Post


In my larder you'll always find, even in hard times, garlic, onions, celery, olive oil, pancetta, pasta, peperoncino and tomatoes!
Pancetta and prosciutto are quite expensive here in my corner of the world.

It is purchased and savored in small amounts.
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Old 09-12-2012, 08:23 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Pancetta and prosciutto are quite expensive here in my corner of the world.

It is purchased and savored in small amounts.
I'm sorry. I really need to work hard on the substitutions.
However, here you cannot find Mountain Dew
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Old 09-12-2012, 08:37 AM   #8
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I'm sorry. I really need to work hard on the substitutions.
However, here you cannot find Mountain Dew
Oh no! I will use the pancetta, like I said it gives me an excuse to buy some. And a chance to see what other delicacies I can be tempted to buy.
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Old 09-12-2012, 10:36 AM   #9
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Bucatini is a fun pasta to try and eat. It like eating cooked straws. The only brand we can find that makes it here is Pastene. Pastene products are treated like a god in this part of the city. I am problably the only one who does not worship this product's name.
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Old 09-12-2012, 11:09 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Bucatini is a fun pasta to try and eat. It like eating cooked straws. The only brand we can find that makes it here is Pastene. Pastene products are treated like a god in this part of the city. I am problably the only one who does not worship this product's name.


I'm a true pasta worshipper, but I have an ecumenical approach...
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Bucatini with tomato, pancetta and vegetables, “Marchigiana” style Hi friends, I found this fine recipe in one of my cookbooks, [I]La pasta delle nonne[/I] (Grandmothers’ pasta). It’s basically one of the 375 billions variations of an Italian tomato+vegs+cured pork pasta sauce. It comes from the Marche region, a beautiful and small region in central Italy, on the Adriatic sea. So, this morning I’ll go out for some basic shopping and I’ll have it for dinner. It looks like a good recipe, with good sound ingredients, easy to make. More comfy than showy, IMO. We’ll see. :chef: Now let’s take a look at the recipe. [B][COLOR="red"]Ingredients serving 4[/COLOR][/B] 150 g pancetta coppata, diced (substitute with pancetta, or prosciutto crudo, but not with other cold cuts, or you would change too much the intended flavor and texture) 1 onion, medium size 1 small carrot 1 celery stick 3 tablespoons EVOO 1 glass red wine 450 g canned chopped peeled tomatoes (not a runny bottled tomato sauce, because we need some texture here) Fine grounded salt and black pepper 2 tablespoons coarse salt 450 g bucatini (or other long shaped pasta, like spaghetti, trenette, etc.) 1 cup grated pecorino cheese (or parmigiano reggiano) [B][COLOR="Red"]How to make Bucatini alla Marchigiana[/COLOR][/B] [B][COLOR="SeaGreen"]1--[/COLOR][/B] Prepare the vegs: finely chop together onion, carrot and celery. Dice the pancetta: you don’t need too large meat cubes, I cut them about 1/2 cm. Warm EVOO in a saucepan on medium heat, add the pancetta and sautée for about 3/5 minutes. You don’t want to cook it for too long, because it will cook again in the tomato sauce, and you want to transfer its “porky” flavor to the sauce. Add and sautée the minced vegs, stirring with a wooden spoon about 4 minutes. Pour in the glass of red wine and let it dry. [B][COLOR="SeaGreen"]2--[/COLOR][/B] In the meantime, bring a large pot of water (about 4 or 5 l water) to a rolling boil, then add about 2 tablespoons of coarse salt. [B][COLOR="SeaGreen"]3--[/COLOR][/B] Add the chopped tomatoes to the saucepan, stir well, cook about 5 minutes, taste it and add grounded salt and black pepper. Cook about 15 minutes on low/medium heat, and check it again before the end to see if it’s savory enough for you. [B][COLOR="SeaGreen"]4--[/COLOR][/B] Add the pasta to the boiling water, stir it and cook it for the time printed on the label. Drain your pasta, put it in the saucepan on high heat and mix it with the sauce very quickly, because you don’t wont to overcook it. Transfer your pasta in a large bowl, stir well, add grated cheese, stir again and serve at once. Buon appetito! :pig: 3 stars 1 reviews
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